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Aortic Aneurysm

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Nursing
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Saint Mary's University
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Running Head: AORTIC ANEURYSM 1
Aortic Aneurysm
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AORTIC ANEURYSM 2
Significance of the client’s history of Marfan Syndrome
Marfan syndrome has a similar occurrence among people of all gender and races. It is
a genetic condition with a risk factor of having a parent with the same disorder. Suppose a
patient presents a history of having Marfan Syndrome, dissection, and Aortic Aneurysm
remains the most common, and life threatens Marfan’s Syndrome manifestation. The
disorder, though, depends on age and requires patients to be monitored through imaging
modalities or echocardiography. Having this in the record, the LNP can deduce that the
patient is having a risk of Aortic Aneurysm, which, according to this patient, is imminent
(Encyclopedia, 2020).
Vital signs that the LNP should report immediately
There is high blood pressure, which causes concern. Normal blood pressure should be
about 128/85 for a 54-year old adult. Anything beyond this should generate an alarm. Like
the case in the question, there is high blood pressure, which indicates that the client is
hypertensive. The temperature causes no warning, and no need to report it. The heart rate is,
however, higher. A standard heart rate should be between 60 to 100 for adults, and anything
lower than 60 or higher than 100 causes an alarm. The two are worth reporting immediately,
and an option to lower them implemented (Encyclopedia, 2020).
Significance of the “pulsatile mass.”
Assessments are often done to know if the patient bears any signs of the presumed
condition. The presence of a pulsatile mass, in this case, can be crucial to clinicians.
According to statistical facts, the clinical palpation of a pulsating mass in the abdomen raises
alerts. The clinician will be made aware of the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm
(AAA). An aneurysm is stated as the localized arterial dilatation greater than or equal to 50%

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Running Head: AORTIC ANEURYSM 1 Aortic Aneurysm Name Course Tutor Date AORTIC ANEURYSM 2 Significance of the client’s history of Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome has a similar occurrence among people of all gender and races. It is a genetic condition with a risk factor of having a parent with the same disorder. Suppose a patient presents a history of having Marfan Syndrome, dissection, and Aortic Aneurysm remains the most common, and life threatens Marfan’s Syndrome manifestation. The disorder, though, depends on age and requires patients to be monitored through imaging modalities or echocardiography. Having this in the record, the LNP can deduce that the patient is having a risk of Aortic Aneurysm, which, according to this patient, is imminent (Encyclopedia, 2020). Vital signs that the LNP should report immediately There is high blood pressure, which causes concern. Normal blood pressure should be about 128/85 for a 54-year old adult. Anything beyond this should generate an alarm. Like the case in the question, there is high blood pressure, which indicates that the client is hypertensive. The temperature causes no warning, and no need to report it. The heart rate is, howe ...
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