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Neurological Perceptual

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Subject
Nursing
School
Grand Canyon University
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Homework
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Running head: RESPONSES TO PEERS 1
Responses to Peers
Nam
Institution

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RESPONSES TO PEERS 2
Responses to Peers
Erin Quin
Alzheimer’s is indeed a serious condition that, as you put it, is characterized by
dementia. Dementia happens progressively in cases of Alzheimer’s, and patients may start by
experiencing ignorable cases of memory loss that become full-blown memory loss in cases of
severe dementia (Livingston et al., 2017). Alzheimer’s, just like most other cases of
dementia, are not curable and therefore have to be managed to limit the progression and
prevent occurrence whenever possible. Mild and moderate Alzheimer’s are serious but allow
the patients to connect with their surroundings and operate semi-autonomously. However,
cases of extreme dementia and Alzheimer’s lead to total memory loss, and patients need to
have caregivers with them constantly.
The lack of a cure for Alzheimer's makes the need to control and prevent the
condition very important. Even though the exact causes of Alzheimer's are not clear to
scientists, several of the behaviors you have mentioned are very important in ensuring a
healthier brain and body in general. The positive life changes are important for holistic
health, and therefore, it makes sense that you suggest them. For instance, smoking affects the
working of the brain, and hence, not smoking may slow Alzheimer’s (Zhong, et al., 2015).
Other behavioral practices that may help include enough physical exercises to ensure proper
blood circulation and the prevention of problems like strokes that may cause dementia and
other brain dysfunctions.
References
Livingston, G., Sommerlad, A., Orgeta, V., Costafreda, S. G., Huntley, J., Ames, D., ... &
Cooper, C. (2017). Dementia prevention, intervention, and care. The
Lancet, 390(10113), 2673-2734.

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Running head: RESPONSES TO PEERS 1 Responses to Peers Nam Institution RESPONSES TO PEERS 2 Responses to Peers Erin Quin Alzheimer’s is indeed a serious condition that, as you put it, is characterized by dementia. Dementia happens progressively in cases of Alzheimer’s, and patients may start by experiencing ignorable cases of memory loss that become full-blown memory loss in cases of severe dementia (Livingston et al., 2017). Alzheimer’s, just like most other cases of dementia, are not curable and therefore have to be managed to limit the progression and prevent occurrence whenever possible. Mild and moderate Alzheimer’s are serious but allow the patients to connect with their surroundings and operate semi-autonomously. However, cases of extreme dementia and Alzheimer’s lead to total memory loss, and patients need to have caregivers with them constantly. The lack of a cure for Alzheimer's makes the need to control and prevent the condition very important. Even though the exact causes of Alzheimer's are not clear to scientists, several of the behaviors you have mentioned are very important in ensuring a healthier brain and body in general. The positive life changes are important for holistic health, and therefore, it makes sense that you suggest them. For instance, smoking affects the working of the brain, and hence, not smoking may slow Alzheimer’s (Zhong, et al., 2015). Other behavioral practices that may help include enough physical exercises to ensure prop ...
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