Access over 20 million homework & study documents

Ethics In Conditioning Research

Content type
User Generated
Subject
Psychology
School
University of Phoenix
Type
Homework
Rating
Showing Page:
1/6
1
Ethics in Conditioning Research
Kristi Husk
PSYCH/635: Psychology of Learning
November 30, 2020

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/6
2
Ethics in Conditioning Research
Introduction
Ivan Pavlov's psychology research addresses the concept of classical conditioning in the
learning processes. The experiment on children and dogs presented the essential processes to test
the unconditioned stimulus (UCS) and the unconditioned response (UCR). The experiment on
dogs entailed presenting meat powder (UCS) to hungry dogs, triggering them to salivate. The
experiment on children involved a device that squeezed the child's wrist, and the child would
open the mouth and salivate when a cookie was released. Both the dog and the child developed a
conditioned reflex and would respond even when UCS was absent (Schunk, 2019). The two
experiments attract ethical concerns, while Pavlov's work can be criticized for violating research
ethics. In the recent conditioning ethical theories, Pavlov violates certain principles such as
Principle A of ethics that entails beneficence and non-maleficence, exposing the children to
risks, and Principle E about the dignity and privacy of the research participants. There are
alternative approaches to facilitate ethical research. Pavlov's experiments would have provided
written consent to the participants to comply with the ethical standards. However, Pavlov's
experiments significantly contributed to understanding the psychology of learning and would be
more meaningful if a psychologist's ethical principles were considered.
Pavlov’s Experiments on Children
Russian physiologist, Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), left the legacy framework for classical
conditioning (Schunk, 2019). His work on digestion won him a Nobel Prize in 1904. While the
director of the physiological laboratory at the Institute of Experimental Medicine in Petrograd;
Pavlov started his saliva testing with dogs. The basic processes are presenting an unconditioned
stimulus (UCS) that triggers an unconditional response (UCR). The process would involve

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/6

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 6 pages?
Access Now
Unformatted Attachment Preview
1 Ethics in Conditioning Research Kristi Husk PSYCH/635: Psychology of Learning November 30, 2020 2 Ethics in Conditioning Research Introduction Ivan Pavlov's psychology research addresses the concept of classical conditioning in the learning processes. The experiment on children and dogs presented the essential processes to test the unconditioned stimulus (UCS) and the unconditioned response (UCR). The experiment on dogs entailed presenting meat powder (UCS) to hungry dogs, triggering them to salivate. The experiment on children involved a device that squeezed the child's wrist, and the child would open the mouth and salivate when a cookie was released. Both the dog and the child developed a conditioned reflex and would respond even when UCS was absent (Schunk, 2019). The two experiments attract ethical concerns, while Pavlov's work can be criticized for violating research ethics. In the recent conditioning ethical theories, Pavlov violates certain principles such as Principle A of ethics that entails beneficence and non-maleficence, exposing the children to risks, and Principle E about the dignity and privacy of the research participants. There are alternative approaches to facilitate ethical research. Pavlov's experiments would have provided written consent to the participants to comply with the ethical standards. However, Pavlov's experiments significantly contributed to understanding the psychology of learning and would be more meaningful if a psychologist's ethical p ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
I use Studypool every time I need help studying, and it never disappoints.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4