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Curved surface mirrors and lenses experimental application

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Physics 110 Lab # Name Date __________
Lab Partner(s)________________________________________________________________
Curved surface mirrors and lenses
I. INTRODUCTION
Mirror and lens. Curved surface mirrors can be constructed by taking a section of a
sphere and using that as a reflective surface for a mirror or as the refractive surface for a
lens. The laws of reflection and refraction studied in the previous lab hold even for a
curved surface. When the light impinges on the curved surface an image can be formed.
Because of the curvature the image will not necessarily be the same size as the object and
the image's distance from the mirror will not necessarily be the same as the distance of
the object.
BEFORE you begin the lab activity make sure you are familiar with the following terms
and ideas from the lectures and the reading materials (may also find useful information
online) Take special note of the following terms: Ray model of light, ray diagrams, focal
point, focal length, object distance, real image, virtual image, image distance,
magnification.
II EQUIPMENT LIST
https://ophysics.com/l10.html
https://ophysics.com/l12.html
III. BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Spherical mirrors, convex and concave, can be used to produce images, but the images
differ in many ways from the image produced in a flat (plane) mirror.
Once the focal length of a spherical mirror is known, then given the position of an object
relative to the focal length, the image type, size and position can be determined.
Spherical surface lens also can be used to produce images. Again, once the focal length
of the lens is known, then using the focal length and the object position and size, the
image type, size and position can be determined.
IV. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE
Part A: Reflection from a Converging (concave) mirror
1. Take some time to understand the controls in the simulation. You can change the
object position and size by left click and hold on the tip of the arrow marked object

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and then moving the point. You can change the focal length by a similar process.
Move the focus to the right of the mirror to change to a diverging mirror
2. Set the focal length to 3. Set and record the size of the object. You should select a size
that allows you to see and measure the image for the first 3 object positions in part 3.
3. Place the object at the following distances from the mirror: 3*f, 2*f, 1.5*f, and f where
f is the distance recorded in Part A2.
4. At each object position measure and record: the image distance (d
i
), the image type
(real or virtual), image orientation (erect or inverted), and the image size (if possible).
Part B: Refraction through a Converging (convex) lens
Change simulations and repeat the procedure and the analysis but using the converging
lens instead of the mirror.
Part C: Diverging mirror and lens
Change the focal length to a negative value for the mirror simulation and then for the
lens. Place the object at 2*f for each and then record the information about the image.
V. DATA
Record the object size and distance and the image size, distance, and orientation for each
situation.
VI. CALCULATIONS
1. Draw ray diagrams for the object distances: 3*f, and 1.5*f for the converging mirror
and the lens.
Be as accurate as possible.
2. Determine the magnification of the mirror at the object positions 3*f and 1.5*f.
VII. CONCLUSION/QUESTIONS
1. What are the possible sources of error in the experiment? How (if possible) can these
errors be minimized?
2. Qualitatively describe what happens to the size, type and position of an image from the
mirror, as the object starts at "infinity" and moves toward the mirror.

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Physics 110 Lab # Name Date __________ Lab Partner(s)________________________________________________________________ Curved surface mirrors and lenses I. INTRODUCTION Mirror and lens. Curved surface mirrors can be constructed by taking a section of a sphere and using that as a reflective surface for a mirror or as the refractive surface for a lens. The laws of reflection and refraction studied in the previous lab hold even for a curved surface. When the light impinges on the curved surface an image can be formed. Because of the curvature the image will not necessarily be the same size as the object and the image's distance from the mirror will not necessarily be the same as the distance of the object. BEFORE you begin the lab activity make sure you are familiar with the following terms and ideas from the lectures and the reading materials (may also find useful information online) Take special note of the following terms: Ray model of light, ray diagrams, focal point, focal length, object distance, real image, virtual image, image distance, magnification. II EQUIPMENT LIST • • III. https://ophysics.com/l10.html https://ophysics.com/l12.html BACKGROUND INFORMATION Spherical mirrors, convex and concave, can be used to produce images, but the images differ in many ways from the image produced in a flat (plane) mirror. Once the focal length of a spherical mirror is known, then given the position of an object relative to the focal length, the image type, size and pos ...
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