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Camouflage analysis from historical science and pop culture readings

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Camouflage Analysis from Historical, Science, and Pop Culture Readings.
A writer’s ability to persuade informs and entertains its reader changes across
different disciplines. This not only affects the purpose of writing but also its tone and style, as
well as what your goal as a reader is when you pick up the text. This is an analysis of how the
writers used, Discipline-specific features, Specific language, writing tone, and style in
various disciplines to explore the subject camouflage.
A science-based textbook, The Nature of Things: Biomimicry by Lila Hogler, makes
claims strictly based on facts, placing its focus on research. Offering a dictionary definition of
Biomimicry, the author continues by introducing the way zebras use camouflage to conceal
their actual distance. The author uses concrete evidence examples to support their claim. For
example, providing information on the different types of Biomimicry in nature, which include
texture, as well as shape and color. The use of scientific language is also evident in the
article, for example the author says, Biomimicry views the natural world as a vast laboratory
filled with completed experiments that can be adapted to make human activities more
efficient. The author also uses comparative techniques to show how camouflage has been
used even in history. For example she compares the Zebra stripes and the dazzle-painted
warships in World War I. Unfortunately; in these types of writings it can be very formal,
ordinary, and straight to the point. Although it can be a very plain reading sometimes, and
drag on forever information the reader can quickly identify how the writer reached his or her
conclusion. The reader can understand how the writer arrived at their point and it can also be
determined whether the information is reputable.
The history-based book Don’t Sink My Battleship! By Kyle Gibson, can correlate
with the science book and logically analyzes camouflage. Information is pulled from
recorded historical events using a logical argument of A + B gives us the result of C. An

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example is the text captures a World War 1 event where Germans could quickly locate
American ships. Because of this, a scientist offered a solution used in nature by zebras to
distort their distance and speed. Logic is implied to make sense of the facts that are thrown at
the reader and engages in larger discussions with other historians telling what happened and
further explaining why it happened. For example the author describes the process of making
camouflage ships by the British army. The author uses comparative language. In the text, the
author compares the British battleship to Zebras and Giraffes, animals that are easy to spot
but hard to track because the patterns they wear break up their outline. The language used
depicts the past, for example the author used words such as vessels. It is also worth noting
that the article is the better part written in the past tense. However, unlike the science book,
these texts can be highly persuasive and entertaining. Of course, this all depends on what the
writer’s intentions are for the topic. As a reader, it can clearly be understood the argument the
author is trying to make, as they often lean towards favoring information.
Razzle Dazzle! Fashion Stars In Stripes is unlike the previous textbooks Science
and History, the pop culture outlines and analyzes the current trends of some features in the
industry such as music, literature, or clothing. The main purpose of a pop-culture entry is to
entertain its readers. The writer sets out to initiate light and current topics and relies mostly
on the information given by others who have used its intended product. The tone tends to be
more friendly, laid-back, and approachable. For example where the author says, “But
combine stilettos with a cincher and a swanky affair could end in a visit to the emergency
room. This is humorous but at the same time a warning. Unlike our history and science
textbooks, it directly addresses the reader and what the reader wants to buy. For instance the
author is advising the clients on what to wear during the hot season and how to combine the
outfits and remain fashionable. The text contains very attention-grabbing information to
capture its readers’ attention. This is because the author intends to sell; therefore the

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Camouflage Analysis from Historical, Science, and Pop Culture Readings. A writer’s ability to persuade informs and entertains its reader changes across different disciplines. This not only affects the purpose of writing but also its tone and style, as well as what your goal as a reader is when you pick up the text. This is an analysis of how the writers used, Discipline-specific features, Specific language, writing tone, and style in various disciplines to explore the subject camouflage. A science-based textbook, The Nature of Things: Biomimicry by Lila Hogler, makes claims strictly based on facts, placing its focus on research. Offering a dictionary definition of Biomimicry, the author continues by introducing the way zebras use camouflage to conceal their actual distance. The author uses concrete evidence examples to support their claim. For example, providing information on the dif ...
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