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Wuthering heights chapter 33 breakdown analysis

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Tamara Awadh
Principal events Theme corollary: Wuthering Heights
Chapter 33 (Chapter XIX, Volume II)
EVENT
Characters Involved
THEME
Principal vs Secondary
Paraphrase: Nelly recounts how
Cathy persuades Hareton to clear
Joseph’s black-currant trees to
make room for flowers from
Thrushcross Grange.
Quote:
She got downstairs before me,
and out into the garden, where
she had seen her cousin
performing some easy work; and
when I went to bid them come to
breakfast, I saw she had
persuaded him to clear a large
space of ground from currant and
gooseberry bushes, and they were
busy planning together an
importation of plants from the
Grange.
I was terrified at the devastation
which had been accomplished
in a brief half-hour; the black-
currant trees were the apple of
Joseph’s eye, and she had just
fixed her choice of a flower-bed
in the midst of them. (pg. 317)
Cathy, Hareton, Nelly
Secondary Theme: Changing
Times
Literary aspects: Symbolism,
Diction
Effects:
The fact that Hareton clears
Joseph’s blackcurrant trees to plant
flowers is a sign of changing times.
It symbolises the termination of
Heathcliff’s revenge. The fact that
the flowers from Thrushcross
Grange are planted in Wuthering
Heights symbolise the peace being
restored to Wuthering Heights and
the merging together of two
opposing locations. Hyperbolic
diction, through the words
“devastation” and “terrified”,
enhance the abrupt change that
engulfs Wuthering Heights.
Paraphrase: At the dinner table,
Cathy argues with Heathcliff, and
Hareton takes her side. When
Joseph complains to Heathcliff
about his blackcurrant trees,
Heathcliff scolds Catherine for
daring to touch his property and
is about to strike her for standing
up to him.
Quote: “‘And who the devil gave
you leave to touch a stick about
the place?’ demanded her father-
in-law, much surprised. ‘And
who ordered you to obey her?’ he
added, turning to Hareton. The
latter was speechless; his cousin
replied ‘You shouldn’t grudge a
Cathy, Hareton, Heathcliff,
Joseph, Nelly
Principal Theme: Revenge,
Violence, Brutality, Forbidden
Love
Literary aspects: Diction,
Repetition, Rhetorical Question
Effects: The hyperbolic diction is
shown by the italicised “you”. The
effect of this is to demonstrate
Cathy and Hareton’s lack of power
under Heathcliff’s reign over
Wuthering Heights. The use of
second-person pronoun reduces
their status significantly and
underlines Heathcliff’s authorial
position. Exclamation marks are
used to show the hatred Cathy and

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Tamara Awadh
few yards of earth, for me to
ornament, when you have taken
all my land!’
‘Your land, you insolent slut?
You never had any!’ said
Heathcliff. (…) ‘Silence!’ he
exclaimed. ‘Get gone, and
begone!’” (p. 320)
Heathcliff have towards each
other. Moreover, Heathcliff’s
rhetorical question “your land, you
insolent slut?” enhances the tone of
incredulity. Heathcliff’s imperious
demand towards Cathy to leave the
room also delineates his
dominating power.
Secondary Theme: Patriarchal
authority, Subordination of women
Literary aspects: Diction
Effect: The brutality is illustrated
through the words “insolent slut’
when Heathcliff refers to Cathy,
which is a degrading term. This
shows the secondary themes of
patriarchal authority and
subordination of women.
Paraphrase: Heathcliff laments
to Nelly, telling her that he has
lost interest in vengeance.
Quote: It is a poor conclusion,
is it not . . . An absurd
termination to my violent
exertions? (...) My old enemies
have beaten me; now would be
the precise time to revenge
myself on their representatives: I
could do it; and none could
hinder me. But where is the use? I
don't care for striking. I can't take
the trouble to raise my hand! That
sounds as if I had been labouring
the whole time, only to exhibit a
fine trait of magnanimity. It is far
from being the caseI have lost
the faculty of enjoying their
destruction, and I am too idle to
destroy for nothing.” (p. 322
323)
Heathcliff
Secondary Theme: Termination
of Revenge
Literary aspects: Rhetorical
Question, Diction, Tone
Effects: Through the use of a
rhetorical question, Heathcliff
stresses how unusual it is that he is
no longer interested in seeking
vengeance. The hyperbolic diction.
through the words “poor” and
“absurd”, further enhance his
disbelief in the termination of his
revenge.
Paraphrase: Heathcliff explains
to Nelly how everything reminds
him of Catherine.
Heathcliff, Catherine, Hareton,
Cathy
Principal Theme: Immortal Love,
Obsession, Supernatural
Literary aspects: Tone,

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Tamara Awadh Principal events Theme corollary: Wuthering Heights Chapter 33 (Chapter XIX, Volume II) EVENT Characters Involved Paraphrase: Nelly recounts how Cathy persuades Hareton to clear Joseph’s black-currant trees to make room for flowers from Thrushcross Grange. Cathy, Hareton, Nelly Literary aspects: Symbolism, Diction Quote: “She got downstairs before me, and out into the garden, where she had seen her cousin performing some easy work; and when I went to bid them come to breakfast, I saw she had persuaded him to clear a large space of ground from currant and gooseberry bushes, and they were busy planning together an importation of plants from the Grange. I was terrified at the devastation which had been accomplished in a brief half-hour; the blackcurrant trees were the apple of Joseph’s eye, and she had just fixed her choice of a flower-bed in the midst of them.” ( ...
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