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Statistics Reflection Paper

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Statistics
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Los Angeles Valley College
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Homework
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Running head: CHILD POVERTY RATES IN CALIFORNIA 1
Reflecting on Child Poverty Rates in California
Student's Name
Institutional Affiliation

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CHILD POVERTY RATES IN CALIFORNIA 2
Reflecting on Child Poverty Rates in California
The current discussion reflects on Carolyn Jones' article, "Child poverty drops in
California, but is still the nation's highest" appearing in a student wellness blog post for
EdSource. The article's citation is "Jones, C. (2018, April 18). Child poverty drops in California,
but is still the nation's highest. Retrieved from https://edsource.org/2018/child-poverty-drops-in-
california-but-is-still-the-nations-highest/596285." It is accessible at
https://edsource.org/2018/child-poverty-drops-in-california-but-is-still-the-nations-
highest/596285
In this article, Jones discusses California's child poverty rates. She notes that the state has
the highest poverty rates in the nation, despite its economy being good (Jones, 2018). She further
indicates poverty rates in the state across different years to unearth trends. However, she asserts
that the states and federal statistics on child poverty rates differ. Despite the drawback, she cites
data that points to a decline of children in deep poverty, to wrap up the article on a high note.
The article mainly utilizes percentages to present information. An example Jones (2018)
puts the average of California's children living below the poverty threshold at 22.8%, which she
adds is an equivalent of 2 million children. What is exciting here is that the percentage cited is
not the actual number, but an average. It is common for population statistics to be compounded
and analyzed in central tendency terms, for purposes of perspective.
With population data, it is easier to present simplified data, especially when the
presentation's target audience is the general public. Jones seems to understand this, and in her
article, "Child poverty drops in California but is still the nation's highest," she presents data in

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Running head: CHILD POVERTY RATES IN CALIFORNIA Reflecting on Child Poverty Rates in California Student's Name Institutional Affiliation 1 CHILD POVERTY RATES IN CALIFORNIA 2 Reflecting on Child Poverty Rates in California The current discussion reflects on Carolyn Jones' article, "Child poverty drops in California, but is still the nation's highest" appearing in a student wellness blog post for EdSource. The article's citation is "Jones, C. (2018, April 18). Child poverty drops in California, but is still the nation's highest. Retrieved from https://edsource.org/2018/child-poverty-drops-incalifornia-but-is-still-the-nations-highest/596285." It is accessible at https://edsource.org/2018/child-poverty-drops-in-california-but-is-still-the-nationshighest/596285 In this article, Jones discusses California's child poverty rates. She notes that the state has the highest poverty rates in the nation, despite its economy being good (Jones, 2018). She further indicates poverty rates in the state across different years to unearth trends. However, she asserts that the states and federal statistics on child poverty rates differ. Despite the drawback, she cites data that points to a declin ...
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