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War traum1

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War Trauma
The victims of war usually suffer trauma, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder.
Often, they show involuntary approaches to relieving trauma, which comprises ill-treatment of
their neighbors, brothers, and family members. Additionally, war trauma is associated with a
feeling of dissociation, guilt, and shame. In the worst cases of PTSD, individuals show denial
and absolute shattering. Vietnam and the famous World War I &II are well known to cause this
nature of trauma. Trauma in the “Cariboo Café,” “The Red Convertible,” and “A Street Car
Named Desire” depicts the difficulties in living the war aftermath.
In The Street Car Named Desire, Stanley Kowalski everyday life has changed to drinking
and abuse. He goes home intoxicated and sees her pregnant wife preparing dinner. He suddenly
feels irrepressible fury with no valid source. This frightens her wife, and Stanley needs to leave
home suddenly. Their marriage is in turmoil because this is a routine that has led to instability.
Based on how he behaves towards his expectant wife, it would be assumed that Stanley is moody
and psychologically unstable. However, his experiences tell it all.
Stanley was a master sergeant and a war veteran. His experiences as a soldier during the
war, most likely the Second World War, reveal that he shows symptoms of PTSD. According to
Michael Scott (125-30), PTSD can be broken down into various criteria. In criteria A, which is
the most relevant, the victim is often exposed to the traumatic events where, he or she was

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directly confronted, exposed or witnessed events that were life-threatening or those that caused
serious physical injuries on the verge of death. This also includes a person exposed to immense
fear and horror where they were vulnerable. Tennessee William shows the effect of PTSD by
exploring how Stanley interacts with the closest people to him. His behavior reveals a closer
resemblance to the criteria explained above.
The first encounter with Stanley is in act one when Blanche, Stella’s old sister, has for the
first time, visited his apartment. Stella explains to her that she can only get along well with
Stanley only if she does not compare him with other men from their home. From this very
beginning, it is evident that Stanley is emotionally unstable. Indeed, Stella lets her sister know
that she cannot approach her husband, ordinarily. This matches with the notion that people living
with PTSD are involved in fear and state of helplessness, where usual talks can evoke severe
emotional responses. This is rational because Stanley already experienced the war. It also
indicates that he was overly sensitive when Stella warns Blanche of Topic to avoid. He is also
highly insecure -a significant reason he distastes comparison with other men. Evidently, he
would be upset because PTSD has mainly affected how his brain can retrieve inadequate SRP
responses. He may feel he does not match up as a man because of the physical damages he may
have collected during the war. Therefore, he is always aggressive to protect himself from the
negative referential perception he harbors.
Trauma evokes changes in the brain. It causes intrusive thought often considered as
unwanted memories and avoidance. In avoidance, the victim tries hard to avoid materials that are
related or stir up emotional trauma. Besides, the victims also depict hyper-vigilance, which is
perceived as overstated surprise responses and alteration of the moods. It is likely that victims
are severely affected by blame and shame. The victims are unaware of how they have lost

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Surname 1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Date War Trauma The victims of war usually suffer trauma, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder. Often, they show involuntary approaches to relieving trauma, which comprises ill-treatment of their neighbors, brothers, and family members. Additionally, war trauma is associated with a feeling of dissociation, guilt, and shame. In the worst cases of PTSD, individuals show denial and absolute shattering. Vietnam and the famous World War I &II are well known to cause this nature of trauma. Trauma in the “Cariboo Café,” “The Red Convertible,” and “A Street Car Named Desire” depicts the difficulties in living the war aftermath. In The Street Car Named Desire, Stanley Kowalski everyday life has changed to drinking and abuse. He goes home intoxicated and sees her pregnant wife preparing dinner. He suddenly feels irrepressible fury with no valid source. This frightens her wife, and Stanley needs to leave home suddenly. Their marriage is in turmoil because this is a routine that has led to instability. Based on how he behaves towards his expectant wife, it would be assumed that Stanley is moody and psychologically unstable. However, his experiences tell it all. Stanley was a master sergeant and a war veteran. His experiences as a soldier during the war, most likely the Second World War, reveal that he shows symptoms of PTSD. According to Michael Scott (125-30), PTSD can be broken down into various criteria. In crite ...
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