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Change unix permissions

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Answer: Detailed answer.
If you run the command
Code:
ls -l
In your home directory, you will get a list of files that may include something like this
Code:
-rw-r--rwx 1 bob users 1892 Jul 10 18:30 linux_course_notes.txt
This basically says, interpreting this from RIGHT to LEFT that the file, linux_course_notes.txt was created at 6:30 PM on July
10 and is 1892 bytes large. It belongs to the group users (i.e., the people who use this computer). It belongs to bob in particular
and it is one (1) file. Then the file permission symbols.
Let's look at what these symbols mean:
The dashes - separate the permissions into three types.
The first part refers to the owner's (bob's) permissions.
The dash - before the rw means that this is a normal file that contains any type of data. A directory, for example, would have a
d instead of a dash.
The rw that follows means that bob can read and write to (modify) his own file. That's pretty logical. If you own it, you can do
what you want with it.
The second part of the these symbols after the second dash, are the permissions for the group. Linux can establish different
types of groups for file access. In a one home computer environment anyone who uses the computer can read this file but
cannot write to (modify) it.
After the two dashes (two here because there is no write and executepermissions for the group) come the overall user
permissions. Anyone, who might have access to the computer from inside or outside (in the case of a network) can
read/write/execute this file, Once again, we can take away the possibility of people reading this file if we so choose.
chmod is a Linux command that will let you assign who can read/write/execute on a file.
Code:
chmod permission1_permission2_permission3 file
When using chmod, you need to be aware that there are three types of Linux users that you are setting permissions for.
Therefore, when setting permissions, you are assigning them for yourself, "your group" and "everyone else" in the world. These
users are technically know as:
Owner

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Answer: Detailed answer. If you run the command Code: ls -l In your home directory, you will get a list of files that may include something like this Code: -rw-r--rwx 1 bob users 1892 Jul 10 18:30 linux_course_notes.txt This basically says, interpreting this from RIGHT to LEFT that the file, linux_course_notes.txt was created at 6:30 PM on July 10 and is 1892 bytes large. It belongs to the group users (i.e., the people who use this computer). It belongs to bob in particular and it is one (1) file. Then the file permission symbols. Let's look at what these symbols mean: The dashes - se ...
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