Access over 35 million academic & study documents

350403433 hormonal system

Content type
User Generated
Rating
Showing Page:
1/5
HORMONAL SYSTEM
The hormonal or endocrine system is the collection of glands that produce hormones that regulate metabolism,
growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood, among other things.
I. Endocrine Glands
1. Hypothalamus
Primary hormones secreted by the hypothalamus include:
Anti-diuretic hormone (ADH): This hormone increases water absorption into the blood by the
kidneys.
Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH): CRH sends a message to the anterior pituitary gland to
stimulate the adrenal glands to release corticosteroids, which help regulate metabolism and immune
response.
Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH): GnRH stimulates the anterior pituitary to release
follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), which work together to ensure
normal functioning of the ovaries and testes.
Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) or growth hormone-inhibiting hormone (GHIH)
(also known as somatostain): GHRH prompts the anterior pituitary to release growth hormone (GH);
GHIH has the opposite effect. In children, GH is essential to maintaining a healthy body
composition. In adults, it aids healthy bone and muscle mass and affects fat distribution.
Oxytocin: Oxytocin is involved in a variety of processes, such as orgasm, the ability to trust, body
temperature, sleep cycles, and the release of breast milk.
Prolactin-releasing hormone (PRH) or prolactin-inhibiting hormone (PIH) (also known as
dopamine): PRH prompts the anterior pituitary to stimulate breast milk production through the
production of prolactin. Conversely, PIH inhibits prolactin, and thereby, milk production.
Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH): TRH triggers the release of thyroid stimulating hormone
(TSH), which stimulates release of thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism, energy, and
growth and development.
2. Pineal Gland
Melatonin: The Pineal Gland Hormone
The pineal gland secretes a single hormonemelatonin (not to be confused with the pigment
melanin). This simple hormone is special because its secretion is dictated by light. Researchers have
determined that melatonin has two primary functions in humansto help control your circadian (or
biological) rhythm and regulate certain reproductive hormones.
3. Pituitary Gland
Anterior Lobe Hormones:
Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH): ACTH stimulates the adrenal glands to produce
hormones.
Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH): FSH works with LH to ensure normal functioning of the
ovaries and testes.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/5
Growth hormone (GH): GH is essential in early years to maintaining a healthy body composition
and for growth in children. In adults, it aids healthy bone and muscle mass and affects fat
distribution.
Luteinizing hormone (LH): LH works with FSH to ensure normal functioning of the ovaries and
testes.
Prolactin: Prolactin stimulates breast milk production.
Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH): TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to produce hormones.
Posterior Lobe Hormones:
Anti-diuretic hormone (ADH): This hormone prompts the kidneys to increase water absorption in
the blood.
Oxytocin: Oxytocin is involved in a variety of processes, such as contracting the uterus during
childbirth and stimulating breast milk production.
4. Thyroid
Hormones of the Thyroid
The two main hormones the thyroid produces and releases are T3 (tri-iodothyronine) and T4
(thyroxine). A thyroid that is functioning normally produces approximately 80% T4 and about 20%
T3, though T3 is the stronger of the pair. To a lesser extent, the thyroid also produces calcitonin,
which helps control blood calcium levels.
5. Parathyroid
Parathyroid Hormone
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has a very powerful influence on the cells of your bones by causing
them to release their calcium into the bloodstream.
PTH regulates how much calcium is absorbed from your diet, how much calcium is excreted by your
kidneys, and how much calcium is stored in your bones.
6. Thymus
Thymosin: The Hormone of the Thymus
Thymosin stimulates the development of T cells. Throughout your childhood years, white blood
cells called lymphocytes pass through the thymus, where they are transformed into T cells.
Once T cells have fully matured in the thymus, they migrate to the lymph nodes (groups of immune
system cells) throughout the body, where they aid the immune system in fighting disease. However,
some lymphocytes, regardless if they reside in the lymph nodes or thymus, can develop into cancers
(known as Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphomas).
Though the thymus gland is only active until puberty, its double-duty function as an endocrine and
lymphatic gland plays a significant role in your long-term health.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/5

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 5 pages?
Access Now
Unformatted Attachment Preview
HORMONAL SYSTEM The hormonal or endocrine system is the collection of glands that produce hormones that regulate metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood, among other things. I. Endocrine Glands 1. Hypothalamus Primary hormones secreted by the hypothalamus include: • • • • • • Anti-diuretic hormone (ADH): This hormone increases water absorption into the blood by the kidneys. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH): CRH sends a message to the anterior pituitary gland to stimulate the adrenal glands to release corticosteroids, which help regulate metabolism and immune response. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH): GnRH stimulates the anterior pituitary to release follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), which work together to ensure normal functioning of the ovaries and testes. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) or growth hormone-inhibiting hormone (GHIH) (also known as somatostain): GHRH prompts the anterior pituitary to release growth hormone (GH); GHIH has the opposite effect. In children, GH is essential to maintaining a healthy body composition. In adults, it aids healthy bone and muscle mass and affects fat distribution. Oxytocin: Oxytocin is involved in a variety of processes, such as orgasm, the ability to trust, body temperature, sleep cycles, and the release of breast milk. Prolactin-releasing hormone (PRH) or prolactin-inhibiting hormone (PIH) (also known as dopamin ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Really great stuff, couldn't ask for more.

Studypool
4.7
Indeed
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4