Access over 20 million homework & study documents

Introduction re

Content type
User Generated
Rating
Showing Page:
1/8
Introduction
Career aspirations are different from individual to individual. It may mean networking with the
right people. It may mean getting training in a specific area. When you focus your efforts, you
can attain what you want. The final thing to consider in career aspirations is those that want
balance. Many people have other aspirations, but find they need balance between their working
and non-working lives. When you have this aspiration, you need to make sure your goals reflect
this need.
Super, Roe, and Holland are three prominent theorists who have helped shape the field of career
development. Each set forth their own theory on how an individual determines his or her future
career path, whether the theory was largely based in a developmental framework, like Super’s, or
based on personality and need theories, like Roe and Holland’s. Super, Roe, and Holland tried to
define which facets of an individual’s life influence his or her career aspirations. Since each
theory was proposed, numerous studies have explored career aspirations in their own right,
including when career aspirations typically develop, common influences on an individual’s
career aspirations, as well as the stability of the aspirations over time. One of the major
determinants of a child’s career aspirations is his or her parent’s expectations. There also seems
to be differences in career aspirations depending on if the child has a learning disability (LD) or
not.
Influential Career Theorists
Donald Super. Donald Super’s theory of career development was largely based in a
developmental framework (Super, 1983). In 1951, Super began a longitudinal Career Pattern
Study (CPS), in which he followed a group of approximately 100 men from the time they were
14 or 15-years- old, until they were 36-years-old (Super, 1985). Super sought to determine the
developmental course that young men follow in their career attainment. He believed that career
development occurred in stages, in which people cycled between career growth, exploration,
establishment, maintenance, and decline (Super, 1985). Super’s stages extended from birth to
retirement age, in which individuals progressed from fantasy to reality in their career aspirations,
and often sought to explore different career options before they settled into a stable career
(Seligman, 1994). Super’s stages also coincided with normal development, in which personal

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/8
developmental milestones influenced career development (Seligman). A central component of
Super’s theory is his belief that self-concept played a vital role in an individual’s developmental
career trajectory (Super, 1985). Super believed that an individual’s self-appraisal of his or her
own abilities, interests, and values gave the individual confidence to explore numerous career
paths, and ultimately to attain career satisfaction in one field (Seligman). Because Super
neglected to study women and minority groups in his CPS, it is questionable whether his work
can generalize to those who are not white, middle class men; however, Super attempted to apply
his work to women as well. His research from the CPS led to four types of career patterns for
male career development and seven career patterns for female career development (Seligman,
1994). For men, Super believed that they fit into either a stable, conventional (several different
trial careers are tried, until stable employment was attained), or unstable, multi-trial career
pattern (frequent career changes, without stable employment) (Seligman). Super’s original career
patterns for women are outdated, given the enormous strides that women have made in the
workforce and toward equality with men. Although Super believed that individuals should
maximize their interests and abilities through their careers, he did not place as strong an
emphasis on individual interests, personality types, and personal needs as subsequently did Roe
and Holland.
Ann Roe. Ann Roe based her theory of career development on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
(Roe, 1957). She believed that occupational choice was directly related to early development and
the type of parent-child relationship that was formed. If the child had all of his or her needs met
at a young age, then the child as an adult would not seek to meet those basic needs through his or
her career; however, any unmet needs were to be fulfilled through career choice (Roe; Seligman,
1994). Roe conceptualized that the way parents related to their children influenced the children
as adults to enter into a career field with an orientation toward others or a field where interaction
with others was minimal). Factors that influenced future career choice stemmed from the
parent’s emotional concentration on the child (i.e., overprotecting or overdemanding), their
avoidance of the child (i.e., rejection or neglect), and/or their acceptance of the child (i.e., casual
acceptance or loving acceptance; Roe).
John Holland. Roe’s career theory is based on the relationship between family environment and
future career choice, whereas John Holland’s theory is based on the relationship between

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/8

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 8 pages?
Access Now
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Introduction Career aspirations are different from individual to individual. It may mean networking with the right people. It may mean getting training in a specific area. When you focus your efforts, you can attain what you want. The final thing to consider in career aspirations is those that want balance. Many people have other aspirations, but find they need balance between their working and non-working lives. When you have this aspiration, you need to make sure your goals reflect this need. Super, Roe, and Holland are three prominent theorists who have helped shape the field of career development. Each set forth their own theory on how an individual determines his or her future career path, whether the theory was largely based in a developmental framework, like Super’s, or based on personality and need theories, like Roe and Holland’s. Super, Roe, and Holland tried to define which facets of an individual’s life influence his or her career aspirations. Since each theory was proposed, numerous studies have explored career aspirations in their own right, including when career aspirations typically develop, common influences on an individual’s career aspirations, as well as the stability of the aspirations over time. One of the major determinants of a child’s career aspirations is his or her parent’s expectations. There also seems to be differences in career aspirations depending on if the child has a learning disability (LD) or not. Influential Career Theorists D ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Just the thing I needed, saved me a lot of time.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Similar Documents