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Jenna DeVellis, Rachel Michelsen, Kelsey Carter, and Chenzi Qian
12/8/2019
Spea K300
Alcohol Consumption Vs. GPA
Introduction:
For this project we looked at how alcohol consumption affects an individual’s overall
GPA. We chose the variable of alcohol intake because we believe it is the most prevalent factor
of what affects GPA for a typical college student. According to Alcohol Rehab Guide, about 80
percent of students engage in drinking alcohol to some degree, and about 50 percent of those
students participate in binge drinking. Due to this statistic, this issue of alcohol consumption
matters because students should be informed of its consequences on GPA. Some college students
prioritize drinking over their academics which leads to them not attending class, not getting
assignments done, and not performing well on exams which results in a bad GPA. The purpose
of this assignment is to develop an experiment to find out the extent of which alcohol
consumption affects a student’s GPA.
Research Design:
For our research we have found an experiment that tests an individual’s alcohol
consumption and compared it to how well they perform in school by looking at their overall
GPA. Our theory is that drinking a certain amount of alcohol will ultimately affect your
performance in school to a certain extent if the intake is particularly high or above average on
any given day. By examining the amount of alcohol intake one person consumes on average, it
can give us a grasp on how much alcohol can affect someone’s GPA or if drinking alcohol does
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not affect GPA at all. For the experiment, alcohol is used as our dependent variable and GPA as
our independent variable. These variables will be able to test our theory because we will be able
to take the mean amount of alcohol from an individual and compare it to their mean GPA. By
comparing the two variables we will be able to analyze if alcohol consumption really does have
an impact on GPA. We compared the mean gpa and mean alcohol consumed in comparison to
the GPA of those who drink versus do not, due to the small sample size of those who did not
drink which would hinder our results. Our prediction is that if the amount of alcohol
consumption exceeds 4 then there is a good probability that person’s GPA will be lower than that
of a person that has less than 4 drinks on average. We realize there are more factors that go into
getting a high GPA, however the amount of alcohol consumption can possibly hinder an
individual's performance due to long or short term health effects.
Data:
We selected our data off of stat crunch which compared students GPA with alcohol
consumption through a survey they conducted. It was not expressed how they conducted their
survey/who they sent it out to, but the sample size is large enough to run tests on.
Alcohol
GPA
0
4.1
0
0
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0
4.3
0
4.5
0
3.65
0
4
0
3.8
0
3.6
0
4.5
0
3
0
2.9
0
3.5
1
3.4
1
4.25
0
3.4
0
2.8
0
4
0
3.5
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4
3.5
0
4.11
3
3.8
1
3.88
2
3.8
1
3.5
0
4.9
0
3.75
0
4
0
3.25
2
4.65
2
4.1
1
4.5
1
4
0
3
5
3.4
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0
3.5
1
3.9
2
3.8
4
3.3
2
3.5
4
3
4
2.8
8
3.1
0
4
0
3.9
0
3
0
3.5
0
4
0
3.2
0
3
0
4
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0
3
1
4
1
3.6
1
3.4
1
3.3
10
3.75
6
4.85
1
4.6
2
4.4
3
4.82
0
4.6
0
4.4
0
4.3
0
4
0
4.8
0
4.75
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0
4.5
0
4.7
4
4
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Minimum: 0
Maximum: 4.9
Result Analysis:
The two-sample t-test indicate that there is enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis
and conclude that there is a statistically significant difference between the two means at 0.05
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level of significance (t (79) = -10.792, p < 0.0001). The results suggest that the average alcohol
consumption is significantly different from the average GPA of the student.
Moreover, we conducted a simple linear regression with alcohol consumption as the
dependent variable and student GPA as the independent variable. The simple linear regression
was conducted to identify the relationship between alcohol consumption and the student GPA.
To investigate how alcohol consumption is influenced by the GPA the student attained.
The analysis revealed that the overall model was not significant at the 0.05 level of significance
(F = 0.6066, p = 0.4388). Furthermore, although GPA of the student postulated a decrease in
alcohol consumption by 0.334 as it increases by one point, it did not have significant
contribution to the predicting power of the model (p = 0.4388). According to the analysis the
predictor variable, GPA of the student, could only explain 0.91% of the variation of the alcohol
consumption which is almost zero. It suggested that 99.09% of the variation of alcohol
consumption was explained by other variables. If the predictor variable was significant, the
regression equation for predicting alcohol consumption based on GPA scores could be: Alcohol
= 2.4435 0.3344*GPA
The scatter plot for the alcohol against student’s GPA score indicated that there was no
relationship between the two variables since the scatter points randomly scattered with no
specific pattern.
Conclusion:
Our research question of does alcohol consumption affects GPA proves to be untrue. We
would, in turn, fail to reject the null hypothesis, as alcohol consumption has very little correlation
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with one's GPA. We find this out due to the r being -.09, which is far from one which shows very
little correlation. However, this does show some negative relationship to a declining GPA as
alcohol intake increases but is not statistically significant enough to say that it causes this
relationship. This is important because this is contrary to what one might think. As drinking is
prevalent in college, it poses the question about how much it actually does impact one's grades
and GPA. As it may not be the best decision for one's well being and health, there seems to be no
correlation in this data set in particular. This data set also did not express how much sleep these
subjects got, their majors, university, and the hours they study which can all be confounding
variables. However, this data is a bit shocking as many people do believe that drinking has a
negative effect on grades, which proves through our tests not to be true.
Works Cited
1. “Alcohol and GPA on StatCrunch.” StatCrunch,
www.statcrunch.com/app/index.php?dataid=1751132.
2. Galbicsek, C. (2019, July 24). College Alcoholism and Binge Drinking. Retrieved from
https://www.alcoholrehabguide.org/resources/college-alcohol-abuse/.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Jenna DeVellis, Rachel Michelsen, Kelsey Carter, and Chenzi Qian 12/8/2019 Spea K300 Alcohol Consumption Vs. GPA Introduction: For this project we looked at how alcohol consumption affects an individual’s overall GPA. We chose the variable of alcohol intake because we believe it is the most prevalent factor of what affects GPA for a typical college student. According to Alcohol Rehab Guide, about 80 percent of students engage in drinking alcohol to some degree, and about 50 percent of those students participate in binge drinking. Due to this statistic, this issue of alcohol consumption matters because students should be informed of its consequences on GPA. Some college students prioritize drinking over their academics which leads to them not attending class, not getting assignments done, and not performing well on exams which results in a bad GPA. The purpose of this assignment is to develop an experiment to find out the extent of which alcohol consumption affects a student’s GPA. Research Design: For our research we have found an experiment that tests an individual’s alcohol consumption and compared it to how well they perform in school by looking at their overall GPA. Our theory is that drinking a certain amount of alcohol will ultimately affect your performance in school to a certain extent if the intake is particularly high or above average on any given day. By examining the amount of alcohol intake one person consumes on average, it can give us a grasp on how much alcohol can affect someone’s GPA or if drinking alcohol does not affect GPA at all. For the experiment, alcohol is used as our dependent variable and GPA as our independent variable. These variables will be able to test our theory because we will be able to take the mean amount of alcohol from an individual and compare it to their mean GPA. By comparing the two variables we will be able to analyze if alcohol consumption really does have an impact on GPA. We compared the mean gpa and mean alcohol consumed in comparison to the GPA of those who drink versus do not, due to the small sample size of those who did not drink which would hinder our results. Our prediction is that if the amount of alcohol consumption exceeds 4 then there is a good probability that person’s GPA will be lower than that of a person that has less than 4 drinks on average. We realize there are more factors that go into getting a high GPA, however the amount of alcohol consumption can possibly hinder an individual's performance due to long or short term health effects. Data: We selected our data off of stat crunch which compared students GPA with alcohol consumption through a survey they conducted. It was not expressed how they conducted their survey/who they sent it out to, but the sample size is large enough to run tests on. Alcohol GPA 0 4.1 0 0 0 4.3 0 4.5 0 3.65 0 4 0 3.8 0 3.6 0 4.5 0 3 0 2.9 0 3.5 1 3.4 1 4.25 0 3.4 0 2.8 0 4 0 3.5 4 3.5 0 4.11 3 3.8 1 3.88 2 3.8 1 3.5 0 4.9 0 3.75 0 4 0 3.25 2 4.65 2 4.1 1 4.5 1 4 0 3 5 3.4 0 3.5 1 3.9 2 3.8 4 3.3 2 3.5 4 3 4 2.8 8 3.1 0 4 0 3.9 0 3 0 3.5 0 4 0 3.2 0 3 0 4 0 3 1 4 1 3.6 1 3.4 1 3.3 10 3.75 6 4.85 1 4.6 2 4.4 3 4.82 0 4.6 0 4.4 0 4.3 0 4 0 4.8 0 4.75 0 4.5 0 4.7 4 4 Minimum: 0 Maximum: 4.9 Result Analysis: The two-sample t-test indicate that there is enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis and conclude that there is a statistically significant difference between the two means at 0.05 level of significance (t (79) = -10.792, p < 0.0001). The results suggest that the average alcohol consumption is significantly different from the average GPA of the student. Moreover, we conducted a simple linear regression with alcohol consumption as the dependent variable and student GPA as the independent variable. The simple linear regression was conducted to identify the relationship between alcohol consumption and the student GPA. To investigate how alcohol consumption is influenced by the GPA the student attained. The analysis revealed that the overall model was not significant at the 0.05 level of significance (F = 0.6066, p = 0.4388). Furthermore, although GPA of the student postulated a decrease in alcohol consumption by 0.334 as it increases by one point, it did not have significant contribution to the predicting power of the model (p = 0.4388). According to the analysis the predictor variable, GPA of the student, could only explain 0.91% of the variation of the alcohol consumption which is almost zero. It suggested that 99.09% of the variation of alcohol consumption was explained by other variables. If the predictor variable was significant, the regression equation for predicting alcohol consumption based on GPA scores could be: Alcohol = 2.4435 – 0.3344*GPA The scatter plot for the alcohol against student’s GPA score indicated that there was no relationship between the two variables since the scatter points randomly scattered with no specific pattern. Conclusion: Our research question of does alcohol consumption affects GPA proves to be untrue. We would, in turn, fail to reject the null hypothesis, as alcohol consumption has very little correlation with one's GPA. We find this out due to the r being -.09, which is far from one which shows very little correlation. However, this does show some negative relationship to a declining GPA as alcohol intake increases but is not statistically significant enough to say that it causes this relationship. This is important because this is contrary to what one might think. As drinking is prevalent in college, it poses the question about how much it actually does impact one's grades and GPA. As it may not be the best decision for one's well being and health, there seems to be no correlation in this data set in particular. This data set also did not express how much sleep these subjects got, their majors, university, and the hours they study which can all be confounding variables. However, this data is a bit shocking as many people do believe that drinking has a negative effect on grades, which proves through our tests not to be true. Works Cited 1. “Alcohol and GPA on StatCrunch.” StatCrunch, www.statcrunch.com/app/index.php?dataid=1751132. 2. Galbicsek, C. (2019, July 24). College Alcoholism and Binge Drinking. Retrieved from https://www.alcoholrehabguide.org/resources/college-alcohol-abuse/. Name: Description: ...
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