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328660 Law Case Study

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Running Head: LAW CASE STUDY 1
Law Case Study: Chimel v. California
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LAW CASE STUDY 2
Law Case Study: Chimel v. California
There were cases where police officers arrived at a suspect's residence with an arrest
warrant but with no search permit for Chimel. After apprehending the accused, they proceeded to
inspect his house. In the Case of Chimel versus California, the United States Supreme Court set
the criteria for organizing a pursuit in case of a repeat of searches without warrants (JUSTIA, US
Supreme Court, n.d). In California, the police officers had reasonable grounds to believe that
Chimel perpetrated burglary where he stole coins and other valuables. They acquired an arrest
warrant concerning him versus California and went to his house, where his wife allowed them
inside. When he came home, the officers arrested him, and without a search warrant, the officers
ransacked the entire house based on the lawful arrest. The police found coins and other
possessions in the bedroom, subsequently found as stolen in one of the robberies.
At the defendant's trial, the prosecutor charged Chimel with burglary. He objected to the
evidence retrieved from his bedroom, arguing that it was the outcome of an unconstitutional
search. The court declared their judgment, which concluded that, regardless of their approval of
the defendant's refusal that the arrest warrant was void, it was constitutional. Furthermore, the
search was substantiated as an incident to a constitutional arrest. The court also concluded that
the warrantless search was reasonable because there was a valid reason to do so. According to
Lampton (2016), a search of any location without the accused consent is unlawful unless there is
an immediate threat that proof may be hidden or destroyed by the accused. That was the basis to
which the officers pegged their unlawful but reasonable search. It was possible to prove it in a
court of law.
A warrantless search is appropriate when there is specific danger of potential evidence
being interfered with. The rationale for choosing this case is that an arrested has the right to

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Running Head: LAW CASE STUDY 1 Law Case Study: Chimel v. California Name University LAW CASE STUDY 2 Law Case Study: Chimel v. California There were cases where police officers arrived at a suspect's residence with an arrest warrant but with no search permit for Chimel. After apprehending the accused, they proceeded to inspect his house. In the Case of Chimel versus California, the United States Supreme Court set the criteria for organizing a pursuit in case of a repeat of searches without warrants (JUSTIA, US Supreme Court, n.d). In California, the police officers had reasonable grounds to believe that Chimel perpetrated burglary where he stole coins and other valuables. They acquired an arrest warrant concerning him versus California and went to his house, where his wife allowed them inside. When he came home, the officers arrested him, and without a search warrant, the officers ransacked the entire house based on the lawful arrest. The police found coins and other possessions in the bedroom, subsequently found as stolen in one of the robberies. At the defendant's trial, the prosecutor charged Chimel with burglary. He objected to the evidence retrieved from his bedroom, ar ...
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