Access over 20 million homework & study documents

search

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post (1)

Content type
User Generated
Rating
Showing Page:
1/3
Read the attachment, develop a 1 page position paper supporting or
against the article's position. This is due by 11:30 tonight. I will assign
you the position you should take. If you are not in class your position
is against the article. You can research/investigate the issue to support
your position.
I was NOT in class so my position is against the article
Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-
Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?
This story is part of a reporting partnership with NPR, WBUR and Kaiser Health News.
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/26/558792020/should-hospitals-be-punished-for-
post-surgical-patients-opioid-addiction: Retrieved on 11/27/17.
In April this year, Katie Herzog checked into a Boston teaching hospital for what turned
out to be a nine-hour-long back surgery.
The 68-year-old consulting firm president left the hospital with a prescription for
Dilaudid, an opioid used to treat severe pain, and instructions to take two pills every
four hours as needed. Herzog took close to the full dose for about two weeks.
Then, worried about addiction, she began asking questions. "I said, 'How do I taper off
this? I don't want to stay on this drug forever, you know? What do I do?' " Herzog says,
recalling conversations with her various providers.
She never got a clear answer.
When none of her providers explained to Herzog how to wean herself off the Dilaudid,
she turned to Google. She eventually found a Canadian Medical Association guide to
tapering opioids.
"So I started tapering from 28 [milligrams], to 24 to 16," Herzog says, scrolling through
a pocket diary with red cardinals on the cover that she used to keep track.
About a month after surgery, she had a follow-up visit with her surgeon. She had
reached the end of her self-imposed tapering path the day before and at the doctor's, she
recalls feeling quite sick.
"I was teary, I had diarrhea, I was vomiting a lot, I had muscle pains, headache, I had a
low-grade fever," Herzog says.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/3
The surgeon thought she had a virus and told her to see her internist. Her internist came
to the same conclusion.
She went home and suffered through five days of what she came to realize was acute
withdrawal, and two more weeks of fatigue, nausea and diarrhea.
"I had every single symptom in the book," Herzog says. "And there was no recognition
by these really professional, senior, seasoned doctors at Boston's finest hospitals that I
was going through withdrawal."
Herzog did not name any of the providers who had something to do with her pain
management or missed signs of withdrawal. She said she sees this as a system-wide
problem. Herzog did share medical records that support her story. After the withdrawal,
she did not crave Dilaudid and she manages any lingering pain with Tylenol. She has
since returned to her providers, who've acknowledged that she was in withdrawal.
Not an isolated incident
Herzog's story is one doctors are hearing more and more. "We have many clinicians
prescribing opioids without any understanding of opioid withdrawal symptoms," says
Dr. Andrew Kolodny, director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing and co-
director of the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University's Heller
School. One reason, Kolodny says, is that doctors don't realize how quickly a patient can
become dependent on drugs like Dilaudid.
Sometimes that dependence leads to full-blown addiction. The majority of street drug
users say they switched to heroin after prescribed painkillers became too expensive.
Now, a handful of doctors and hospital administrators are asking, if an opioid addiction
starts with a prescription after surgery or some other hospital-based care, should the
hospital be penalized? As in: Is addiction a medical error along the lines of some
hospital-acquired infections?
Writing for the blog and journal Health Affairs, three physician-executives with the
Hospital Corporation of America argue for calling it just that.
"It arises during a hospitalization, is a high-cost and high-volume condition, and could
reasonably have been prevented through the application of evidence-based guidelines,"
write Drs. Michael Schlosser, Ravi Chari and Jonathan Perlin.
The authors admit it would be hard for hospitals to monitor all patients given an opioid
prescription in the weeks and months after surgery, but they say hospitals need to try.
"Addressing long-term opioid use as a hospital-acquired condition will draw a clear line
between appropriate and inappropriate use, and will empower hospitals to develop
evidenced-based standards of care for managing post-operative pain adequately while
also helping protect the patient from future harm," said Schlosser in an emailed
response to questions.
Kolodny said it's an idea worth considering.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/3

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Read the attachment, develop a 1 page position paper supporting or against the article's position. This is due by 11:30 tonight. I will assign you the position you should take. If you are not in class your position is against the article. You can research/investigate the issue to support your position. I was NOT in class so my position is against the article Should Hospitals Be Punished For PostSurgical Patients' Opioid Addiction? This story is part of a reporting partnership with NPR, WBUR and Kaiser Health News. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/26/558792020/should-hospitals-be-punished-forpost-surgical-patients-opioid-addiction: Retrieved on 11/27/17. In April this year, Katie Herzog checked into a Boston teaching hospital for what turned out to be a nine-hour-long back surgery. The 68-year-old consulting firm president left the hospital with a prescription for Dilau ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Great! Studypool always delivers quality work.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4