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THE CONCEPT AND LEGAL NATURE OF INTERNATIONAL SANCTIONS

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THE CONCEPT AND LEGAL NATURE OF INTERNATIONAL SANCTIONS
[Name of Student]
[Institutional Affiliation]
[Date of Submission]

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Implemented by individual states, trading blocks, corporate organizations, or
international governing bodies, sanctions define retaliatory and coercive measures against states
or organizations that have perceivably engaged in illegal activities or breached established
agreements. In some cases, sanctions may be used against states perceivably intending to breach
international law.
1
The most common international sanctions aim at hindering war, terror, and
trade in illegal and dangerous merchandise like weapons, illegal drugs, and human organs.
Recent examples of international sanctions include the 1998 to 2001 United States sanction
against India to control nuclear proliferation, the 1997 to 2003 United Nations sanction against
Sierra Leone to push for increased democratic practices, and the 1997 to 2003 Economic
Community of West African States (ECOWAS) sanction on Liberia in support of the rebel group
named Revolutionary United Front.
2
The most common approaches of legality adopted by
international sanctions include embargos against arms and illegal merchandise, asset freezing,
financial prohibitions, withdrawal of state support and technical assistance, and restriction of
imports and exports.
All international legal sanctions trace their sources to the breach of international law and
expectations laid on individual states as members of the international community. These are
defined by the responsibility for actions that endanger international peace and cause
confrontations. Markedly, commissions or omissions by one state or groups of states result in
these predicaments. While one state may extend unnecessary military aggression towards
another, others may permit illegal activities within their borders. In the end, such illegal practices
1
. Marossi, Ali, and Marisa Bassett. Economic Sanctions Under International Law:
Unilateralism, Multilateralism, Legitimacy, and Consequences (The Hague, Netherlands: T.M.C.
Asser Press, 2015), 1.
2
. Smillie, Ian. Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond
Trade (London: Anthem Press, 2010), 18.

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THE CONCEPT AND LEGAL NATURE OF INTERNATIONAL SANCTIONS [Name of Student] [Institutional Affiliation] [Date of Submission] 1 Implemented by individual states, trading blocks, corporate organizations, or international governing bodies, sanctions define retaliatory and coercive measures against states or organizations that have perceivably engaged in illegal activities or breached established agreements. In some cases, sanctions may be used against states perceivably intending to breach international law.1 The most common international sanctions aim at hindering war, terror, and trade in illegal and dangerous merchandise like weapons, illegal drugs, and human organs. Recent examples of international sanctions include the 1998 to 2001 United States sanction against India to control nuclear proliferation, the 1997 to 2003 United Nations sanction against Sierra Leone to push for increased democratic practices, and the 1997 to 2003 Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) sanction on Liberia in support of the rebel group named Revolutionary United Front.2 The most common approaches of legality adopted by international sanctions include embargos against arms and illegal merchandise, asset freezing, financial prohibitions, withdrawal of state support and technical assistance, and restriction of imports and exports. All international legal sanctions trace their sources to the breach of international law and expectations laid on individual states as members of the internat ...
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