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Management and Gender Differences Essay

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Running Head: Management 1
Gender Differences
Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
Management
Date
(Total Words:2076)

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Management 2
Gender Differences
INTRODUCTION
Previously, women could only stay at home and take care of the house while the bulk of males
went to work. They were unable to work since they lacked the legal authority to do so. However,
this long-held belief has been disproved. Women are working in greater numbers than ever
before in today's society. According to Statistics Canada (2017), there were more than 9 million
women employed in Canada at the end of 2016. As can be seen, the number of women in the
workforce has risen significantly. Women not only work as workers, but also as business owners.
They occupy a variety of key roles in businesses, including chief executives, managers, board
members, and board chairmanships. In 2016, women had 21.6 percent of board seats in Canada's
Financial Post 500. (Catalyst, 2017). According to Catalyst's study, the proportion of women
directors has been steadily rising in many industrialized nations. For example, in June 2016, it
represented 23.4 percent of women on boards in Australia, almost tripling from 2009. The
increase in the number of women in the workforce enables businesses to expand more quickly
and achieve greater success. As a business student, we are fascinated by the economic
contributions of women. They play an essential part in the formation of the company's values.
Dr. Mijntje Luckerath-Rovers (2011) found that businesses with female executives perform
better than those with exclusively male executives. Furthermore, women may offer distinct
talents to the board that their male counterparts cannot, allowing the board to diversify a broad
variety of knowledge (Kim and Starks, 2016, p. 270). They claim that gender diversity
contributes to better company values. Despite society's efforts to promote gender equality, there
is little indication that this contentious problem will go away. Based on personal research and
surveys, we offer additional in-depth proof showing the presence of women on boards actively
and successfully improves businesses' performance. We'll also address one of the most important
questions: "Will gender diversity be promoted in the future?" How would it change: for the
better or for the worse?”
DEFINITION
Diversity in boards is a combination of human capital, according to the Dictionary of Business in
1996 (as quoted in Walt and Ingley, 2003, p. 219), where human capital is defined as the skills
and information acquired by a person through the process of learning and experience. Diversity

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Running Head: Management 1 Gender Differences Student’s Name Institutional Affiliation Management Date (Total Words:2076) Management 2 Gender Differences INTRODUCTION Previously, women could only stay at home and take care of the house while the bulk of males went to work. They were unable to work since they lacked the legal authority to do so. However, this long-held belief has been disproved. Women are working in greater numbers than ever before in today's society. According to Statistics Canada (2017), there were more than 9 million women employed in Canada at the end of 2016. As can be seen, the number of women in the workforce has risen significantly. Women not only work as workers, but also as business owners. They occupy a variety of key roles in businesses, including chief executives, managers, board members, and board chairmanships. In 2016, women had 21.6 percent of board seats in Canada's Financial Post 500. (Catalyst, 2017). According to Catalyst's study, the proportion of women directors has been steadily rising in many industrialized nations. For example, in June 2016, it represented 23.4 percent of women on boards in Australia, almost tripling from 2009. The increase in the number of women in the workforce enables businesses to expand more quickly and achieve greater success. As a business student, we are fascinated by the economic contributions of women. They play an essential part in the formation of the company's values. Dr. Mijntje Luckerath-Rovers ...
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