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Love on Plato Work the Symposium Critical Analysis

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Analytical Review

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Critical Analysis of Love on Plato’s work, “The Symposium”
The philosophical text is entitled, "The Symposium." The author is an ancient
philosopher called Plato, and was written 385BC. The book entails different points of view of
various philosophers and leaders towards Eros, who was considered the god of love. The degree
of controversies depicted by the other points of view makes the text famous. It almost touches on
the different views towards love for each individual interested in a deeper understanding of love.
The symposium is quite dramatic, entertaining, and lively, highly meriting it as a classical
philosophical description of what love entails or should entail. The Socrates' dialectics ultimately
attracts and appeals to any philosopher's attention. Plato idea about love is interesting but self-
centered because Plato recognize the genesis of love in unpractical lack and upcoming valid
needs to fill this void.
Socrates has a different approach to this topic. He decides to approach it by inducing the
philosophers to think by the questions unveiled. He speaks immediately after Agathon and
inquires of the necessity of one desiring something already in their possession. Agathon is left
point-blank and thus Agrees that it would be unreasonable (Sheffield 82). By approaching this
subject with such mind-joggling answers, Socrates induces the other philosophers to think
beyond the physical and natural nature of love that they based their arguments. By this means,
Socrates brushes off Agathon's idea of love's true desires: beauty and truth.

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The aspect of love is analysed much more critically by appreciating its availability as an
intermediary. He outlines that it is present and neither possesses nor is it deficient of the
properties stipulated by Agathon. Socrates insists that if love's desire is to beauty, then it ought to
be Ugly. Conceptualizing love as ugly brushes off Agathon's concept of beauty, since at the time,
love was appreciated and was thought to be a lovely force as stipulated by the same Agathon. He
further adds that if love desires the youth, then it ought to be old. Love is some sought of
energizing spirit that could not be related to an old grumpy nature. Socrates's approach towards
love is unmatched and his ability to instill critical thinking towards the ideal nature of love rather
than the surface quantification of what love is.
Socrates further proves his intelligence and intellectual capacity by smoothly transiting to
storytelling. His approach and means of introducing his arguments are worth noting. He narrates
a story told to him by a woman called Diatoma. The woman originates from Mantinea. From the
tale, Socrates explains how love is neither a god nor a mortal but a daemon. In the ancient Greek
world, a deamon was considered to be halfway between man and spirit. The story is an old myth
describing the origin of love. It was formulated in a bouquet among the gods to celebrate the
birth of Aphrodite. Plutus, the god of Wealth, was present at the banquet; joining him was the
god of poverty, who came to beg. By Plutus being drunk and unconscious, the duo slept together
and conceived a baby by the name of love. Therefore, love was introduced into the world as an
intermediary between two distinctively different gods. With this myth, he can critically instill his
concept of love to everyone at the banquet. Socrates describes that love is always an
intermediary.
Recent works by Chapman are in agreement with the view of love as an intermediary.
Chapman's psychological approach to love indicates that love could produce negative and

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Surname 1 Student's Name Professor's Name Course Date Critical Analysis of Love on Plato’s work, “The Symposium” The philosophical text is entitled, "The Symposium." The author is an ancient philosopher called Plato, and was written 385BC. The book entails different points of view of various philosophers and leaders towards Eros, who was considered the god of love. The degree of controversies depicted by the other points of view makes the text famous. It almost touches on the different views towards love for each individual interested in a deeper understanding of love. The symposium is quite dramatic, entertaining, and lively, highly meriting it as a classical philosophical description of what love entails or should entail. The Socrates' dialectics ultimately attracts and appeals to any philosopher's attention. Plato idea about love is interesting but selfcentered because Plato recognize the genesis of love in unpractical lack and upcoming valid needs to fill this void. Socrates has a different approach to this topic. He decides to approach it by inducing the philosophers to think by the questions unveiled. He speaks immediately after Agathon and inquires of the necessity of ...
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