Access over 20 million homework & study documents
search

Bilingualism Multilingualism and Plurilingualism Paper

Content type

User Generated

Subject

Linguistics

Type

Essay

Rating

Showing Page:
1/5
Bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism in the
globalisation era, especially when it comes to the English
Language.
Before one must conquer as to what goes on in bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism
in globalization, it is important to have an idea of what each and every one of them mean.
Globalisation, being a process of people coming together or we could say interacting;
Bilingualism on the other hand means “The ability to speak two languages proficiently.”,
multilingualism; The ability to speak many languages proficiently (though not necessarily
perfectly). Leaving us with plurilingualism that consists of “the capacity and competence to learn
more than one language, as well as the value of linguistic tolerance within individuals and
countries. This term is often used to talk about language education and policy.” (Elaine, 2018)
Now that we know what all three mean, we can see here that we will be dealing with the latest
trends and roles that interlink with our main hypothesis that is how education, language
acquisition and other factors have had an impact in the globalisation era. It is worth taking a look
on how to world is evolving meaning each time people of all languages and cultures and coming
together and forming what we now know of as a diversity, (Doiz, Lasagabaster & Sierra, 2013)
prove this by stating the following “One of the main tools for globalisation is language.” already
we see here the great importance that a language holds, before anything else, when it comes to
globalizing - bringing people together.
As we are well aware, the english language is at the lop of the list for most spoken and known
languages in today’s world, especially when it comes to education as Wilkinson (2004) once
concluded “we are led to believe that English is the language university students, faculty
members and administration personnel need if they are to succeed in a globalising world that
demands an international career” (as cited in, Doiz, Lasagabaster & Sierra, 2013 ). As much as it
is important for countries to come together and interact there are concerns made by Phillipson
(2009) who, which could be said, opposes to Wilkinson for fear that:
Globalisation cannot be deemed neutral, as the learning of powerful languages becomes a
heavily loaded engagement by raising feelings of imposition, cultural occupation and
identity loss on those who are forced to learn these powerful languages...the globalisation
process may bring about tensions between the different languages involved, be they the
local language(s), English as a lingua franca, and/or the home language(s) in the case of
international students (as cited in, Doiz, Lasagabaster & Sierra, 2013 ).

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/5
We all have a mother tongue, or maybe even two if our parents come from different countries,
but what must be considered is how education is playing a role in adding more than just our
mother tongue into our life and whether this is beneficial or causing us identity problems.
King (2018) described how a hatred has been going around, especially towards the English
Language:
Hatred of English learning ‘When I interviewed an outstanding freshman of China
Central Academy of Fine Arts on English learning, the No.1 art university in China, I can
feel the feeling of hate toward English learning in her voice. It seems to her learning
English is totally a waste of her life, and it is just a way to enter university. When I
interviewed the university lecturers in English in the Mongolia Technology University,
two lecturers couldn't help crying because of the embarrassment and feeling of failure on
using English. I was very shocked at the moment, but at the same time I deeply
understood them.’
Most of the world is now forcing people to learn English in order to get into universities or in
order to work, despite the fact that they will be using the language or not. King, as much as he is
an Englishman himself he seemed to have understood this case and has brought us a few
solutions. If we make sure that we are working to protect Europe’s rich linguistic diversity,
promoting language learning and multilingualism, and the importance of languages for trade and
competitiveness” some of the hatred and problems could go away.
If English will always be on top, is questionable as Crystal (2007) predicts “Much will depend
on what happens in the countries with the largest populations, notably China, Japan, Russia,
Indonesia and Brazil.” According to him, no other languages have spread as much as these have,
not to forget English, but thanks to technology the message and learning of languages has been
able to spread more and more throughout the years, than lets say, in history. He then goes on to
state how, because English does not have that much culture in comparison to many other
countries and languages that have been alive for much longer - there is no reason for the world to
be in fear for the language is mostly being used as a universal language for everyone to
communicate by.
The EU Language Policy on the other hand, has its mind elsewhere, while as much as King
(2018) believes in the importance of English he still states how important it is not to leave out
promoting language learning meaning all languages and not just english, we see what this policy
means when they point out, “The aim of EU language policy is to promote the teaching and
learning of foreign languages in the EU and to create an environment that is friendly towards all
Member State languages. Foreign language competence is regarded as one of the basic skills that
all EU citizens need to acquire in order to improve their educational and employment
opportunities within the European learning society, in particular by making use of the right to
freedom of movement of persons” (as cited in King, 2018).

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/5

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism in the globalisation era, especially when it comes to the English Language. Before one must conquer as to what goes on in bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism in globalization, it is important to have an idea of what each and every one of them mean. Globalisation, being a process of people coming together or we could say interacting; Bilingualism on the other hand means “The ability to speak two languages proficiently.”, multilingualism; The ability to speak many languages proficiently (though not necessarily perfectly). Leaving us with plurilingualism that consists of “the capacity and competence to learn more than one language, as well as the value of linguistic tolerance within individuals and countries. This term is often used to talk about language education and policy.” (Elaine, 2018) Now that we know what all three mean, we can see here that we will be dealing with the latest trends and roles that interlink with our main hypothesis that is how education, language acquisition and other factors have had an impact in the globalisation era. It is worth taking a look on how to world is evolving meaning each time people of all languages and cultures and coming together and forming what we now know of as a diversity, (Doiz, Lasagabaster & Sierra, 2013) prove this by stating the following “One of the main tools for globalisation is language.” already we see here the great importance that a language hold ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Great! 10/10 would recommend using Studypool to help you study.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4