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RES 861 GCU Effects of Social Media use on Mental Health Worksheet

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User Generated

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Psychology

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Grand Canyon University

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Showing Page:
1/16
Running head: REVIEW RESOURCES
1
The Effects of Social Media use on the Mental Health of Young Adults
Chagoll Brown
Grand Canyon University: RES- 861
3/30/2021

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Showing Page:
2/16
Running head: REVIEW RESOURCES
2
Num
ber
Article Information: Be sure entries are presented in alphabetical order
Added
to
RefWo
rks? Y
or N
(option
al
1.
Reference
Barry, C.T., Sidoti, C.L., Briggs, S.M., Reiter, S.R., & Lindsey, R.A. (2017). Adolescent
social media use and mental health from adolescent and parent perspectives.
Journal of adolescence, 61, 1-11 .
Permalink
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.08.005
Annotation
This study researched pre-adult and parent reports of juvenile social media use and
its connection to immature psychosocial change. The example comprised of 226
members (113 parent-juvenile dyads) from all through the United States, with
adolescents (55 guys, 51 females, 7 unreported) extending from ages 14 to 17.
Parent and pre-adult reports of the quantity of adolescents' social media accounts
were tolerably connected with parent-announced DSM-5 side effects of
distractedness, hyperactivity/impulsivity, ODD, uneasiness, and burdensome
manifestations, just as immature revealed dread of passing up a major opportunity
(FoMO) and depression. Finally, tension and burdensome indications were most
noteworthy among adolescents with a generally high number of parent-detailed
social media accounts and moderately high FoMO.
N
2.
Reference
Beyens, I., Pouwels, J.L., van Driel, I.I. et al.
The effect of social media on well-being differs from adolescent to adolescent. Sci
Rep 10, 10763 (2020).
Permalink
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67727-7
Annotation
The question whether or not social media use advantages or undermines
adolescents’ well-being is an essential societal concern. Previous empirical research
has often set up across-the-board results amongst (sub)populations of adolescents.
As a result, it is nevertheless an open query whether or not the outcomes are
special for every character adolescent. We sampled adolescents’ experiences six
instances per day for one week to quantify variations in their susceptibility to the
results of social media on their short-term affective well-being. Rigorous analyses of
2,155 real-time assessments confirmed that the affiliation between social media
use and affective well-being differs strongly throughout adolescents: While 44% did
now not sense higher or worse after passive social media use, 46% felt better, and
N

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Running head: REVIEW RESOURCES 1 The Effects of Social Media use on the Mental Health of Young Adults Chagoll Brown Grand Canyon University: RES- 861 3/30/2021 Running head: REVIEW RESOURCES 2 Num ber Article Information: Be sure entries are presented in alphabetical order 1. Reference Barry, C.T., Sidoti, C.L., Briggs, S.M., Reiter, S.R., & Lindsey, R.A. (2017). Adolescent social media use and mental health from adolescent and parent perspectives. Journal of adolescence, 61, 1-11 . Added to RefWo rks? Y or N (option al N Permalink https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.08.005 Annotation This study researched pre-adult and parent reports of juvenile social media use and its connection to immature psychosocial change. The example comprised of 226 members (113 parent-juvenile dyads) from all through the United States, with adolescents (55 guys, 51 females, 7 unreported) extending from ages 14 to 17. Parent and pre-adult reports of the quantity of adolescents' social media accounts were tolerably connected with parent-announced DSM-5 side effects of distractedness, hyperactivity/impulsivity, ODD, uneasiness, and burdensome manifestations, just as immature revealed dread of passing up a major opportunity (FoMO) and depression. Finally, tension and burdensome indications were most noteworthy among adolescents with a generally high number of parent-detailed social media accounts and moderately high FoMO. 2. Reference Beyens, I., Pouwels, J.L., van Driel, I.I. et al. The ...
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