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Queens College Schizophrenia and Childhood Trauma Essay

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Psychology

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Queens College City University of New York

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Running Head: SCHIZOPHRENIA AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA 1
Schizophrenia and Childhood Trauma:
The Emerging Correlation Between this Neurodevelopmental Illness and Traumatic Experiences
Grace Trunz
Queens College City University of New York

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Running Head: SCHIZOPHRENIA AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA 2
Schizophrenia is known to be a neurodevelopmental disorder, having both genetic and
environmental factors that can potentially alter brain development and causes illness. Many
genetic specialists and other researchers have a good grasp on how schizophrenia can be past
down through genes. However, many other psychologists and analysts have wondered which
environmental factors play a big role in establishing a vulnerability to the psychotic symptoms
that makes up schizophrenia. One specific factor that has been recently observed and analyzed is
childhood trauma. Whether it be physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, there seems to be a
connection to many patients with schizophrenia who have experienced some degree of traumatic
events during their childhood. In this analysis, we are going to discuss why and how childhood
trauma has such a big affect on a large amount of people with schizophrenia.
Many different researchers have considered childhood trauma to be a large cause to the
development of schizophrenia. These hypotheses eventually have turned into fairly concrete
conclusions from various studies and tests. For example, in one study, researchers took about
150 participants and split them into two groups. One group had to some degree psychotic
symptoms and/or schizophrenia, while the other had no mental illnesses. Each person was
evaluated for childhood trauma with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. As expected, it was
discovered that they found a greater amount of people with childhood trauma within the group of
patients than the group of healthy individuals (Sahin et al., 2013). This is definitely a study that
needs to be researched further, but it is interesting how in a random group of patients and healthy
people there was a significantly higher amount of individuals that went through some sort of
trauma in their childhood and happen to have schizophrenia.
In another study, participants (both diagnosed with schizophrenia and without illness)
were chosen to be assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Both groups of

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Running Head: SCHIZOPHRENIA AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA 1 Schizophrenia and Childhood Trauma: The Emerging Correlation Between this Neurodevelopmental Illness and Traumatic Experiences Grace Trunz Queens College City University of New York Running Head: SCHIZOPHRENIA AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA 2 Schizophrenia is known to be a neurodevelopmental disorder, having both genetic and environmental factors that can potentially alter brain development and causes illness. Many genetic specialists and other researchers have a good grasp on how schizophrenia can be past down through genes. However, many other psychologists and analysts have wondered which environmental factors play a big role in establishing a vulnerability to the psychotic symptoms that makes up schizophrenia. One specific factor that has been recently observed and analyzed is childhood trauma. Whether it be physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, there seems to be a connection to many patients with schizophrenia who have experienced some degree of traumatic events during their childhood. In this analysis, we are going to discuss why and how childhood trauma has such a big affect on a large amount of people with schizophrenia. Many different researchers have considered childhood trauma to be a large cause to the development of schizophrenia. These hypotheses eventually have turned into fairly concrete conclusions from various studies and tests. For example, in one study, researchers took about 150 participants and split them in ...
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