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There is an increase in the number of children suffering from the traditionally considered
adult-hood chronic illnesses. The number of children suffering from these conditions is
continuously increasing amongst the populations due to lifestyle changes and dynamics in social
and economic disparities that are increasing. The increase in development of chronic illness
among children has established the need for primary care intervention to mitigate the health
challenge.
Sources
The main sources of primary pediatric care in the USA include the pediatric centers,
school-based health centers, pediatric services offered in hospitals and pediatric inpatient units.
Other likely sources for primary care for the pediatrics are the pediatric home services provided
by qualified providers such as nurse practitioners.
The Child Health Fund posits that over 20 million children in the USA lack access to
essential health care services. This depicts a high percentage of limited access to care within the
pediatric community in the USA. In essence, the statistics speak to the fact that the available
resources for primary pediatric care are inadequate to meet the demand in the USA. Most
children have limited access to preventive services of care with many pediatric conditions
remaining undiagnosed until school-age. The services available in the primary care sites are also
not usually well structured to address the primary health needs of the children hence further
limiting the access to primary health pediatric care.
Population lacking access
Data from Medicaid, CHIP, and ACA indicates that despite improvement in access to
care by children, 5% of the children still face barriers to accessing health care. According to a
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statistical study by Brookings Institute which was based on the 2010 US census information, the
population of white children in the USA declined significantly by 4.3 million. On the other hand,
the population of Latino and Asian descent grew by 5.5 million (Kuo, Etzel, Chilton, Watson &
Gorski, 2012). Access to health is determined by the ability to pay and the social-economic
status of the population. In areas with higher children population, the ability to pay for health
insurance or out-of-pocket pediatric care is low leading to low reach for health services among
the Latinos, Asian and Black-American children (Grace, Horn, Hall & Cheng, 2015). Most of the
children from the minority races in USA lack access to primary health with access to care only
available during emergencies.
Barriers
Barriers to children access to primary care are topped by the cost of healthcare and the
limited ability of the populations to pay for healthcare. Marginalized populations which tend to
have a higher number of children often may lack insurance and have low economic abilities and
cannot afford the cost of primary care (Grace, Horn, Hall & Cheng, 2015). Another barrier is the
fragmented health system that is tasked with caring for the pediatric population needs. It has also
been observed that lack of adequate capacity among the pediatric care providers could cause
limitations to pediatric care. Pediatric care providers may avoid touching on health issues they
are not adequately trained for hence limiting access to care for the children. Other barriers
include the existence of poor health belief systems in different communities which hinder
preventive health, such populations do not value access to health for preventive purposes.
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References
Grace, A., Horn, I., Hall, R., & Cheng, T. (2015). Children, Families, and Disparities. Pediatric
Clinics of North America, 62(5), 1297-1311. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2015.06.003
Kuo, A., Etzel, R., Chilton, L., Watson, C., & Gorski, P. (2012). Primary Care Pediatrics and
Public Health: Meeting the Needs of Today’s Children. American Journal of Public
Health, 102(12), e17-e23. http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2012.301013

Unformatted Attachment Preview

There is an increase in the number of children suffering from the traditionally considered adult-hood chronic illnesses. The number of children suffering from these conditions is continuously increasing amongst the populations due to lifestyle changes and dynamics in social and economic disparities that are increasing. The increase in development of chronic illness among children has established the need for primary care intervention to mitigate the health challenge. Sources The main sources of primary pediatric care in the USA include the pediatric centers, school-based health centers, pediatric services offered in hospitals and pediatric inpatient units. Other likely sources for primary care for the pediatrics are the pediatric home services provided by qualified providers such as nurse practitioners. The Child Health Fund posits that over 20 million children in the USA lack access to essential health care services. This depicts a high percentage of limited access to care within the pediatric community in the USA. In essence, the statistics speak to the fact that the available resources for primary pediatric care are inadequate to meet the demand in the USA. Most children have limited access to preventive services of care with many pediatric conditions remaining undiagnosed until school-age. The services available in the primary care sites are also not usually well structured to address the primary health needs of the children hence further limiting the access to primary health pediatric care. Population lacking access Data from Medicaid, CHIP, and ACA indicates that despite improvement in access to care by children, 5% of the children still face barriers to accessing health care. According to a statistical study by Brookings Institute which was based on the 2010 US census information, the population of white children in the USA declined significantly by 4.3 million. On the other hand, the population of Latino and Asian descent grew by 5.5 million (Kuo, Etzel, Chilton, Watson & Gorski, 2012). Access to health is determined by the ability to pay and the social-economic status of the population. In areas with higher children population, the ability to pay for health insurance or out-of-pocket pediatric care is low leading to low reach for health services among the Latinos, Asian and Black-American children (Grace, Horn, Hall & Cheng, 2015). Most of the children from the minority races in USA lack access to primary health with access to care only available during emergencies. Barriers Barriers to children access to primary care are topped by the cost of healthcare and the limited ability of the populations to pay for healthcare. Marginalized populations which tend to have a higher number of children often may lack insurance and have low economic abilities and cannot afford the cost of primary care (Grace, Horn, Hall & Cheng, 2015). Another barrier is the fragmented health system that is tasked with caring for the pediatric population needs. It has also been observed that lack of adequate capacity among the pediatric care providers could cause limitations to pediatric care. Pediatric care providers may avoid touching on health issues they are not adequately trained for hence limiting access to care for the children. Other barriers include the existence of poor health belief systems in different communities which hinder preventive health, such populations do not value access to health for preventive purposes. References Grace, A., Horn, I., Hall, R., & Cheng, T. (2015). Children, Families, and Disparities. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 62(5), 1297-1311. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2015.06.003 Kuo, A., Etzel, R., Chilton, L., Watson, C., & Gorski, P. (2012). Primary Care Pediatrics and Public Health: Meeting the Needs of Today’s Children. American Journal of Public Health, 102(12), e17-e23. http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2012.301013 Name: Description: ...
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