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Dear XVY, the post on the health belief model was informative and interesting to
read. In addition, the health belief model is based on other key assumptions which include;
Individuals are likely to take health cations when they feel they can avoid a negative health
result, have the positive assumption that if they take the action, that is recommended they will
consequently avoid the negative health outcome and when they have high self-efficacy on
taking the recommended health action (Jones et al., 2014).
In the application of the health belief model, nurses in oncology can then be able to
estimate or predict the likely health behaviors of the patients based on the patient belief and
perceptions of their health (Shao, Wang, Liu, Tian & Li, 2018). I have found this model
especially effective in the management of patients who have been diagnosed with cancer for
the first time as well as in providing health care for those at risk of cancer. Inpatient
diagnosed with the condition for the ‘first time, usually there exists many perceived barriers
to their care, doubts on perceived benefits of the treatment options available which affect
their coping. The model informs on the health education and patient counseling approaches
to adapt to enhance the patient's self-efficacy and hence promote their uptake and adherence
to care.
The Health Belief Model as a model in care can also be implemented together with
other models of care such as the Health Promotion Model, in enhancing the adoption of better
health habits and promoting the patient’s uptake of the healthy behaviours to promote their
ability to cope with illness while at the same time promote the patient’s self-directed
behaviour in promoting their own health and influencing their health outcomes more
positively.
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References
Jones, C., Jensen, J., Scherr, C., Brown, N., Christy, K., & Weaver, J. (2014). The Health
Belief Model as an Explanatory Framework in Communication Research: Exploring
Parallel, Serial, and Moderated Mediation. Health Communication, 30(6), 566-576.
doi: 10.1080/10410236.2013.873363
Shao, C., Wang, J., Liu, J., Tian, F., & Li, H. (2018). Effect of a Health Belief Model-based
education program on patients’ belief, physical activity, and serum uric acid: a
randomized controlled trial. Patient Preference and Adherence, Volume 12, 1239-
1245. doi: 10.2147/ppa.s166523

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Dear XVY, the post on the health belief model was informative and interesting to read. In addition, the health belief model is based on other key assumptions which include; Individuals are likely to take health cations when they feel they can avoid a negative health result, have the positive assumption that if they take the action, that is recommended they will consequently avoid the negative health outcome and when they have high self-efficacy on taking the recommended health action (Jones et al., 2014). In the application of the health belief model, nurses in oncology can then be able to estimate or predict the likely health behaviors of the patients based on the patient belief and perceptions of their health (Shao, Wang, Liu, Tian & Li, 2018). I have found this model especially effective in the management of patients who have been diagnosed with cancer for the first time as well as in providing health care for those at risk of cancer. Inpatient diagnosed with the condition for the ‘first time, usually there exists many perceived barriers to their care, doubts on perceived benefits of the treatment options available which affect their coping. The model informs on the health education and patient counseling approaches to adapt to enhance the patient's self-efficacy and hence promote their uptake and adherence to care. The Health Belief Model as a model in care can also be implemented together with other models of care such as the Health Promotion Model, in enhancing the adoption of better health habits and promoting the patient’s uptake of the healthy behaviours to promote their ability to cope with illness while at the same time promote the patient’s self-directed behaviour in promoting their own health and influencing their health outcomes more positively. References Jones, C., Jensen, J., Scherr, C., Brown, N., Christy, K., & Weaver, J. (2014). The Health Belief Model as an Explanatory Framework in Communication Research: Exploring Parallel, Serial, and Moderated Mediation. Health Communication, 30(6), 566-576. doi: 10.1080/10410236.2013.873363 Shao, C., Wang, J., Liu, J., Tian, F., & Li, H. (2018). Effect of a Health Belief Model-based education program on patients’ belief, physical activity, and serum uric acid: a randomized controlled trial. Patient Preference and Adherence, Volume 12, 12391245. doi: 10.2147/ppa.s166523 Name: Description: ...
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