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Compare high context communication cultures with low context communi

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Compare high-context-communication cultures with low-
context-communication cultures. Give examples of each.
Solution
High-context culture and the contrasting low-context
culture are terms presented by theanthropologist Edward
T. Hall in his 1976 book Beyond Culture. It refers to a
culture\'s tendency to use high-context messages over low-
context messages in routine communication. This choice of
speaking styles translates into a culture that will cater to
in-groups, an in-group being a group that has similar
experiences and expectations, from which inferences are
drawn. In a higher-context culture, many things are left
unsaid, letting the culture explain. Words and word choice
become very important in higher-context communication,
since a few words can communicate a complex message
very effectively to an in-group (but less effectively outside
that group), while in a low-context culture, the
communicator needs to be much more explicit and the
value of a single word is less important.
Context as a relativistic metric of culture

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A cultural context does not rank as \"high\" or \"low\" in an
absolute sense because each message can be presented
on a continuum from high to low. Likewise, a culture
(French Canadian) may be of a higher context than one
(English Canadian) but lower context than another
(Spanish or French). Likewise, a stereotypical individual
from Texas (a higher-context culture) may communicate
more with a few words or use of a prolonged silence, than
a stereotypical New Yorker who is being very explicit,
although both being part of a culture which is lower context
overall. Typically a high-context culture will be relational,
collectivist, intuitive, and contemplative.[1] They place a
high value on interpersonal relationships and group
members are a very close knit community.[2]
While the milieu of individuals in a culture can be diverse,
and not all individuals can be described by strict
stereotypes, understanding the broad tendencies of
predominant cultures can help inform and educate
ourselves on how to better facilitate communication
between individuals of differing cultures. The following
spectrum of levels of context in various cultures was
determined in 1986 by Copeland & L. Griggs:
How higher context relates to other cultural metrics
Higher-context cultures tend to be more common in the
Asian cultures than in European, and in countries with low

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Compare high-context-communication cultures with lowcontext-communication cultures. Give examples of each. Solution High-context culture and the contrasting low -context culture are terms presented by theanthropologist Edward T. Hall in his 1976 book Beyond Culture. It refers to a culture\'s tendency to use high-context messages over lowcontext messages in routine communication. This choice of speaking styles translates into a culture that will cater to in-groups, an in-group being a group that has similar experiences and expectations, from which inferences are drawn. In a higher-context culture, many things are left unsaid, letting the culture explain. Words and word choice become very important in higher -context communication, since a few words can communicate a complex message very effectively to an in-group (but less effectively outside that group), while in a low-context culture, the communicator needs to be much more explicit and the value of a single word is less important. Context as a relativistic metric of culture A cultural context does not rank as \"high\" or \"low\" in an absolute sense because each message can be presented on a continuum from high to low. Likewise, a culture (French Canadian) may be of a higher context than one (English Canadian) but lower context than another (Spanish or French). Likewise, a stereotypical individual from Texas (a higher-context culture) may communicate more with a few words or use of a prolonged silence, than a stereotypic ...
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