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A local government organization has been testing a new biological

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A local government organization has been testing a new
biological triggering device. The actual cost has gotten out
of hand and they have recruited you to test the new style
trigger through simulation. How does the trigger work?
The trigger device is a 20 by 20 grid where each square is
a sensor. Each square in the grid starts with one flea. (The
flea is the biological part) All the fleas jump and land on a
neighboring square or the current square which leaves
some squares blank or without a flea. Some squares will
then have more than one flea. The fleas continue to jump
and at some point when 85% of the squares are blank (no
fleas) the trigger is fired. If the flea jumps off the 20 x 20
grid, the flea is zapped and will no longer be able to jump.
Using actual fleas and the termination of the fleas during
testing was the big cost over run the government was
having to deal with. Now to simulate this process, we need
to know which way a flea will jump. A flea will only jump to
a neighboring square and never two or more squares
over. (These fleas are breed with shorter legs so they
cant jump as far.) Now after much research, it was
determine which direction a flea will jump. There are nine
places/squares a flea can land, the neighboring square or
the square the flea is currently jumping from. A flea will
jump in one of the corner squares 5% of the time. Each
corner is 5%. The top, bottom, left and the current square
the flea will jump in 15% of the time and to the right 20% of
the time. 20% direction is the way the dogs hair grows and
the fleas jump with the hair a little more often than in the
other directions. A flea is in the middle square and the
directions the flea will jump are shown below.
5 15 5
15 15 20
5 15 5

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A simulation consists of setting one flea on each square
then letting each flea jump. After each jumps check to see
if 85% of the squares are empty. If they are not, then let
each flea jump again. You continue letting the fleas jump
until 85% of the squares are empty and the simulation
stops, ie the bomb is detonated. Now since jumping is
random movements, running one simulation will not be
enough information needed to accomplish this task. You
will need to run the simulation again and again to get an
average. You will need to run the simulation 2000 times
and then compute the following resulting values.
Inputs:None
Outputs: 1. How many times will the fleas jump before the
trigger is fired?
2. If fleas jumps 5 times every 9 seconds, determine how
much time does one have to clear the area before the
trigger is fired?
3. What is the shortest time and the longest time you
computed, given all simulations that was needed to clear
the area?
4. How many fleas on the average were lost before the
trigger was fired? (This is to show the government the cost
savings for using simulation rather than using real fleas in
a simulation.)
Restrictions:Use 2-d arrays(2). Run the simulation 2000
times to generate the results.
Output:Format output in a readable style.
***** Please use comments so that the professor and
myself will know what functions do what******

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A local government organization has been testing a new biological triggering device. The actual cost has gotten out of hand and they have recruited you to test the new style trigger through ‘simulation’. How does the trigger work? The trigger device is a 20 by 20 grid where each square is a sensor. Each square in the grid starts with one flea. (The flea is the biological part) All the fleas jump and land on a neighboring square or the current square which leaves some squares blank or without a flea. Some squares will then have more than one flea. The fleas continue to jump and at some point when 85% of the squares are blank (no fleas) the trigger is fired. If the flea jumps off the 20 x 20 grid, the flea is zapped and will no longer be able to j ump. Using actual fleas and the termination of the fleas during testing was the big cost over run the government was having to deal with. Now to simulate this process, we need to know which way a flea will jump. A flea will only jump to a neighboring square and never two or more squares over. (These fleas are breed with shorter legs so they can’t jump as far.) Now after much research, it was determine which direction a flea will jump. There are nine places/squares a flea can land, the neighboring square o r the square the flea is currently jumping from. A flea will jump in one of the corner squares 5% of the time. Each corner is 5%. The top, bottom, left and the current square the flea will jump in 15% of the time and to the rig ...
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