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Vegetables

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Chemistry
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Rasmussen University
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BCBT 100: Science of Cooking
Individual Experimental Labs
Overview of project:
The second half of the class consists of three units covering the chemistry of specific types of foods. You will need to
design and carry outalab experiment for each to explore questions you have about the science behind the foods covered
in each unit. Example experiment ideas pertinent to each unit are provided in the D2L content for the unit. Each lab will
need toadhere to the scientific method (see: https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science-fair/steps-
of-the-scientific-method) following good techniques for a food-based science experiment. Each lab will need to be
written up and submitted according to the guidelines below.
Each experiment must be designed scientifically, involve making measurements,and be hypothesis driven. You will need
to ask a specific question about the foods you are interested in and come up with a testable hypothesis that gets at the
science behind the food. A good way to do this is to make note of questions you had or things you found interesting as
you read through the units. For example, you may question what the effect of aging is on cheese, and your hypothesis is
that an aged cheddar cheese will be more crumbly, harder, denser, and have a more pungent flavor than cheddar
cheese curds that have not been aged. Or perhaps you wonder how the process of making cheese changes how the
cheese melts, so you hypothesize that cheddar cheese will take longer to melt than mozzarella or brie cheeses. Maybe
you wonder how acids and bases influence cooking vegetables, and hypothesizethat boiling vegetables in water with
baking soda will result in them being greener than cooking them in acidic water.
There are many things you can measure to gain evidence that either supports or disproves your hypothesis. You can
make a ranking sheet of particular tastes/textures/characteristics and do a blind test (like in Unit 2). You can measure a
variety of physical properties using your scale, thermometer,measuring cup or other household gadgets (ruler, cell
phone timer, etc) to monitor things like mass, volume, density, time, temperature, stretch, or spread (like in Unit 3). You
could even measure water content by weighing something before and after a drying (or wetting) process, such as baking
a cake or cooking beans or lentils, to see how much mass was lost as it dried out or gained as it absorbed water.
You will write up your experiment according the instructions below.In addition tohandingin your reports through the
Unit 4-6 Lab Report Submission assignment folders in D2L, you will share your experiment report and images with the
rest of the class through the D2L Unit 4-6‘Experimental Lab Presentation’ discussion boards.A combination of your
report and comments on other experiments will be what is graded for the lab based on the rubric below.Your
experiment must be appropriately documented with at least one selfie of you taking measurements and appropriate
documentation of the data collection!
***IMPORTANT NOTE*** While you may be used to seeing market or social science research (i.e. 3 out of 4 people
like this brand of ice cream best, or most people prefer the taste of muffins made with sugar vs artificial sweetener),
that is not appropriate for a natural science study. Natural science research is designed to be as objective as possible,
and asks questions about the physical and chemical properties of the food itself, not how people respond to it. Social
science research on food preferences is very interesting, but is based on specific types of statistics and study design
not covered in this course and LASC 3 rubric, and so cannot be used for this assignment.
Instructions for Each Lab Report:
Your report should consist of each of the following headings with text, images, and/or data tables that address the
content required for each section.
1. Introduction and Hypothesis(5pts):

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This section is to introduce the basics of your experiment with a focus on why you are doing it, what you expect
to see as you carry out the experiment, and your rationale for why you think you will obtain those results.
Your hypothesis section must address the following:
Describe the overall question you are answering in this experiment.
What is your hypothesis?
What is your justification for your hypothesis?
Specifically, you will need to let us know what question you are hoping to answer in doing your experiment.
Agood question will be based on trying to understand the food characteristics described in this unit itself, and
will tell you something about the science of the foods being explored.
Your best guess of the answer to this question is known as the hypothesis of your experiment. A hypothesis is a
statement of what you think will happen in an experiment. It should be specific and testable. This is your
educated guess of what you think the experiment or activity will produce or show. For example, your hypothesis
might state what the difference will be between two types of chocolate based on your readings, or how you
expect your homemade yogurt to taste/feel/look like. Remember that this is scientific, so should be focused on
measurable things that you can test in the experiment, NOT PREFERNCES.The words ‘best’, ‘favorite’, or ‘prefer’
should not appear in your hypothesis (or anywhere else in your experiment). These are opinions based on the
expectations and experience of yourself and anyone else involved, and will likely drastically differ if someone
else does the experiment. Instead, stick to more objective outcomes that may influence why you find something
to be ‘the best’. For example, a hypothesis like “I think sweet cream butter will taste better than margarineis
an opinion, and not repeatable or scientific so will receive minimal points. Something like “I think sweat cream
butter will be more solid andless spreadable than margarine” or “I think sweet cream butter will melt faster than
margarine” are more scientific and testable.
Finally, a hypothesis is an educated guess, not a random idea, so you also need to include a short justification for
why you think your experimental question/hypothesis is reasonable. Examples of this could be something you
read or came across in the materials for the class, that all recipes you have seen said to do this, that it is an old
family trick, or observations you have made in the past. That said, it is 100% fine (and actually expected) if your
data do not support your hypothesis!You don’t have to be right, just thoughtful.
Answer: -
INTRODUCTION/HYPOTHESIS/RATIONALE
Vegetables contributes to be the essential item in our kitchen as it is the important of our daily
diet. Therefore, it is very important to know before cooking, which vegetable will change color or boil
first or change the texture.
Now, I have taken two vegetables for this experiment Spinach and Carrot. The aim of this
experiment is to find out whether this vegetables will change color, texture and differ in weight after
boiling them.
Hypothesis:- I assume that Spinach will leave green color and Carrot will leave pale green color after
boiling.
Experimental design and methods (10pts):
Design your experiment and write a paragraph or two detailing specifically what you tested or carried out and
why you chose your specific measurements to test your hypothesis.Your methods section must address the
following:
What was your independent variable? Your dependent variable(s)?
What steps did you take to reduce ‘confounding’ factors? In other words, how did you ensure that the
independent variable is responsible for any differences or results you saw in the experiment, rather than
something else?
Describe how you are objectively measuring your dependent variables in a way that would enable
someone else to repeat the experiment and get the same results.
Write out your step-by-step experimental process, explaining the reason for each key
step/measurement.

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BCBT 100: Science of Cooking Individual Experimental Labs Overview of project: The second half of the class consists of three units covering the chemistry of specific types of foods. You will need to design and carry outalab experiment for each to explore questions you have about the science behind the foods covered in each unit. Example experiment ideas pertinent to each unit are provided in the D2L content for the unit. Each lab will need toadhere to the scientific method (see: https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science-fair/stepsof-the-scientific-method) following good techniques for a food-based science experiment. Each lab will need to be written up and submitted according to the guidelines below. Each experiment must be designed scientifically, involve making measurements,and be hypothesis driven. You will need to ask a specific question about the foods you are interested in and come up with a testable hypothesis that gets at the science behind the food. A good way to do this is to make note of questions you had or things you found interesting as you read through the units. For example, you may question what the effect of aging is on cheese, and your hypothesis is that an aged cheddar cheese will be more crumbly, harder, denser, and have a more pungent flavor than cheddar cheese curds that have not been aged. Or perhaps you wonder how the process of making cheese changes how the cheese melts, so you hypothesize that cheddar cheese will take longer to ...
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