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HUM 111 To Drill or Not to Drill

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To Drill or Not to Drill
I agree with President Obama that we should begin pushing to free America from
dependency on foreign oil. Not only does that dependency make the United States
venerable from an economic perspective, but also in a military perspective. As long as
the U.S. is dependent on other sources for oil and other resources, it’s in constant
danger of being cut-off, or even worse, coerced (1) into performing actions for other
countries. According to a recent statistic from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration, in 2009 over 1.5 million barrel were imported from countries that were
members of the OPEC with over 62% coming from Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, and
Nigeria. Another 1.7 million barrels were imported from non OPEC (2) members (2010).
Any of those countries could decide to stop exporting oil to the U.S. which would cause
the, already struggling, economy to possibly collapse. By turning to renewable
resources such as solar power and clean coal, President Obama is attempting to rid the
United States of those possibilities and become more independent. Opposing
arguments may believe it’s unnecessary to spend money on such expensive projects,
but the outcome is well worth the price. Everything costs money in today’s global
economy so why should research be any different? Another view states that the U.S.
could continue to drill off of its own oil reserves to help. That is one possibility; however
the idea is to hold on to its own reserves for when it actually is needed. Because oil is
not renewable, careful consideration must be used in deciding how it gets used.
Currently, fossil fuels, like crude oil, contribute to an average of 83.7% of the energy in
the United States alone (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2010). Its only going
(1) Coerced – to force to act or think a certain way by use of pressure, threats, or intimidation.
(2) OPEC – The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.

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to last for so long. In the end, I think making the push for alternatives to oil can only
benefit the United States. It will create cheaper sources of energy while also making the
U.S. more independent from other countries.
I’m pretty sure the first habit that is keeping me from seeing the “big picture” is
the face saving habit. Just as I was about to write this part of the assignment, the first
thing that went through my mind was, “I don’t have any habits because I was objective.”
I think having that initial opinion is face saving because I didn’t like that I had habits that
made me seem close minded. Another habit I noticed may be a form of conformity. I say
“may” because it’s essentially the opposite of conformity. I have realized that in many
situations that require choosing a side, I either find reasons to choose both or I choose
the option that few others have picked. In a way I think it’s conforming by trying not to
conform instead of choosing what I really want. In order to overcome these habits I plan
to think before thinking as the book calls it. I have already used it in a way to determine
what habits I have that hinder thinking. By simply taking a minute or two to step back
and think about ideas or thoughts, I feel like I become more objective. I think the hardest
part is going to be remembering to slow down and think before assuming or jumping
into a decision. Being honest with myself is another step I intend to use to overcome the
habits. It works well with thinking before thinking because while I’m taking the time to be
more objective, I can also be trying to determine why I’m thinking, or choosing, a certain
idea.

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Resources
U.S. Energy Information Administration. (2010). U.S. Energy Consumption by Energy
Source. Retrieved from
http://www.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_ep00_im0_mbbl_a.htm.
U.S. Energy Information Administration. (2010). U.S. Energy Consumption by Energy
Source. Retrieved from
http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/alternate/page/renew_energy_consump/table1.html.

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Anonymous
I was struggling with this subject, and this helped me a ton!

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