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DIABETES TYPE 2 SELF MONITORING
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Diabetes Type 2 Self -Monitoring
Self-Monitoring the Evidence
Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients often use their blood and urine samples to self-
monitor their glucose levels. This study evaluates how effective this technique is in enhancing
the control of blood glucose using a review process and meta-analysis.
The process of blood and urine glucose self-monitoring is widely recommended and
used as an integral strategy to enhance the management and control of Diabetes and
associated complications in a trial program for Type 1 diabetes. In a prior trial, the UKDPS
advised that monitoring be varied as per the control quality of blood and urine glucose although
the results of the trial did not yield substantive results to ascertain the viability and residual
benefit of self- monitoring for patients. The Meta analysis failed to generate proof that self -
monitoring was beneficial to diabetic patients. The results were inconclusive, vague and any
beneficial quality of the self -testing was missed and nor were any small adverse effects
deduced.
The confidence intervals for the GHb reduction estimates were broad and hence there’s
a likelihood that the process of self monitoring can be related to a GHb reduction of not more
than 0.6%. This study identified that a variance among clusters of 7% as compared to 7.9%
achieved clinical benefits for the patients in a ten year period. In the study clusters a reduction
by 1% in mean HbA1C was linked to a 21% i.e. 17% -24% reduced risk level of all diabetes
similar endpoints. Data analysis from The DCC&T in type 1 diabetes also elucidated that minute
variations in HbA1C could have clinical importance. Many trials were done within a short time
frame and therefore were limited in their ability to gauge the full efficacy of the effects of self -
monitoring (Anhalt, 2016). Credible research also argues that it is inopportune to include results
generated using different techniques for the approximation of glycated haemoglobin.
There have been four other reviews that include a Meta-analysis of the efficacy of self -
monitoring that hold varied positions towards this study’s conclusion, i.e. Victor Stephani et al.
(2018), Polonsky et al, (2020), Malanda et al. (2012) and Young et al. (2017). Diabetes care
involves a lot of commitment in treatment by medication, care and health information. Based on
this knowledge, self-monitoring becomes dependent on the quality and form of diabetes
information available to the patient and hence when analyses such as this are being carried out,
the respondents should have a uniformity of information access about diabetes access in order

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DIABETES TYPE 2 SELF MONITORING Name Course Name and Number Name of Professor Institutional Affiliation Date Submitted Diabetes Type 2 Self -Monitoring Self-Monitoring the Evidence Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients often use their blood and urine samples to selfmonitor their glucose levels. This study evaluates how effective this technique is in enhancing the control of blood glucose using a review process and meta-analysis. The process of blood and urine glucose self-monitoring is widely recommended and used as an integral strategy to enhance the management and control of Diabetes and associated complications in a trial program for Type 1 diabetes. In a prior trial, the UKDPS advised that monitoring be varied as per the control quality of blood and urine glucose although the results of the trial did not yield substantive results to ascertain the viability and residual benefit of self- monitoring for patients. The Meta analysis failed to generate proof that self monitoring was beneficial to diabetic patients. The results were inconclusive, vague and any beneficial quality of the self -testing was missed and nor were any small adverse effects deduced. The confidence intervals for the GHb reduction estimates were broad and hence there’s a likelihood that the process of self –monitoring can be related to a GHb reduction of not more than 0.6%. This study identified that a variance among clusters of 7% as compared to 7.9% achieved clinical benefits for the patients in a te ...
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