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False Friends among Philippine Languages

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False Friends among Philippine Languages
*The list is expanding, thus more words will be added in the coming days. Check this thread
regularly for the additional false friends.* List last updated: a total of 228 words with 53
additional words as of February 08, 2011
One factor that creates problems in communications between the speakers of different
Philippine languages are the terms called false friends. False friends are words in two
languages or dialects that look and/or sound similar, but differ in meaning. False friends could
also be called false cognates. For example, British English uses “fish and chips” for a popular
takeaway food in UK but for American English speakers, they called the food “fish and fries” for
chips have a different meaning to them.
In Philippine languages wherein 180+ local languages or dialects are being used, there are a
number of examples where a word in one language will have a greatly different meaning in
another language. Being unfamiliar with these false friends might cause miscommunications
which happened in numerous cases in conversations between different Filipino tribes.
Some false friends might differ in pronunciations, though.
A
abay
In Hiligaynon, this means bridesmaid/groomsmen.
In Ilocano, this means beside a person or a thing
abot
In Tagalog, this means to reach out.
In Ilocano, this means a hole.
aga
In Tagalog, this means early.
In Cebuano, this means morning.
agas
In Tagalog, this means flowing or bleeding.
In Ilocano, this means medicine.

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agi
In Cebuano, this means to pass by.
In Hiligaynon, this means a gay person or hermaphrodite.
In Kapampangan, this means a spider web.
amang
In Cebuano, this means someone with speech impairment or a mute. In Ilocano, this is what you
call ones father
amin
In Tagalog, this means to admit. It could also mean ours.
In Ilocano, this means everyone or all of us.
ani
In Tagalog, this means harvest
In Hiligaynon, ani means this
ania
In Cebuano, this means here.
In Ilocano, anya or ania means what.
apa
In Tagalog, this means ice cream cone.
In Ilocano, this means to fight.
In Hiligaynon, this means someone with speech impairment or a mute
apo
In Tagalog, this means grandchild.
In Ilocano, this means an elder.
ari
In Tagalog, this means own or property
In Hiligaynon, this means here is or present.
In Ilocano and Kapampangan, this means a king
asa
In Tagalog, this means hope .
In Cebuano, this means where.
aso

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No Title False Friends among Philippine Languages *The list is expanding, thus more words will be added in the coming days. Check this thread regularly for the additional false friends.* List last updated: a total of 228 words with 53 additional words as of February 08, 2011 One factor that creates problems in communications between the speakers of different Philippine languages are the terms called false friends. False friends are words in two languages or dialects that look and/or sound similar, but differ in meaning. False friends could also be called false cognates. For example, British English uses “fish and chips” for a popular takeaway food in UK but for American English speakers, they called the food “fish and fries” for chips have a different meaning to them. In Philippine languages wherein 180+ local languages or dialects are being used, there are a number of examples where a word in one language will have a greatly different meaning in another language. Being unfamiliar with these false friends might cause miscommunications which happened in numerous cases in conversations between different Filipino tribes. Some false friends might differ in pronunciations, though. A abay In Hiligaynon, this means bridesmaid/groomsmen. In Ilocano, this means beside a person or a thing abot In Tagalog, this means to reach out. In Ilocano, this means a hole. aga In Tagalog, this means early. In Cebuano, this means morning. agas In Tagalog, this means flowing or ble ...
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