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Analyzing and Interpreting Data
Ballard Integrated Managed Services (BIMS) conducted an internal survey for 440 employees,
excluding top management, asking 10 questions on morale and four questions on
demographics. BIMS upper management noticed a change in staff morale and an increase in
the staff turnover rate, which initiated the survey. Barbara Tucker, General Manager, wants to
discover what is making employees want to leave and has enlisted the help of Debbie Horner.
Debbie Horner, human resources manager for Ballard, created an internal survey in hopes to
calculate descriptive and frequency techniques, and study the data for possible relationships. A
total of 78 responses were returned, which is a 17.3% response rate (University of Phoenix
Week Two Supplement, 2012). All 78 employees answered on a scale of one to five, with one
being very negative and five being very positive.
Question #1 of the survey asks employees how well they enjoy working for BIMS. Based on the
survey data collected, nineteen percent marked that they were very negative about working at
BIMS. Twenty six percent of BIMS employees were negative toward enjoying their work. Over
50% of the participants ranked between being satisfied and very positive about their job at
BIMS. Management should communicate with employees to find ways to boost employee
morale.
Question #2 of the survey asks employees if they enjoyed their assigned shift at BIMS. On the
survey on whether the employees enjoyed their shifts about 49 percent were either satisfied, felt
positive or were very positive concerning their shift at BIMS, 47 percent of the surveyed
employees felt very negative and negative about their shifts. Four percent of the participants did
not respond. The management at BIMS should make available to employees a variety of shifts
such as being off every other Friday, a 4pm-10pm shift where employees work their 40 hours in
four days instead of the traditional five day work week or change 12 hour shifts to eight hour
shifts.
Question #3 of the survey asks employees if their request for their desired shift was fulfilled.
Twenty-one percent of employees felt their request for their desired shift was not fulfilled.
Thirteen percent of the employees had both a very positive and positive experience. The
average experience ranked fifteen percent. The total of employees with very negative
experiences in having their desired shift fulfilled was fifteen percent. The data collected shows
that management at BIMS should take serious consideration of employee requests in an
attempt to keep employees happy and the turnover rate down.
Question #4 of the survey asks employees how many times he/she has called in sick. The
survey shows a negative overall result in the amount of employees calling in sick at a total of
twenty-one percent. Both spectrums of the scale showed the same results, which were very
negative at fifteen percent and very positive at fifteen percent. The average amount of
employees calling out sick was twelve percent. From the results of this survey, BIMS
management may want to look at their sick policy to determine if doctor's excuses are needed
for each occurrence or maybe meet with employees to determine why so many have called out
sick.
Questions #5 and #6 asks about company training and pay outcomes. These findings lead to
high results in the negative class. This concludes that BIMS employees are unsatisfied with
company training and pay, which relates to the low employee morale.
Question #7 asks if your supervisor treats you fairly. According to the percentage rates of the

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survey, 26.3 percent had negative responses to the supervisor treating individuals fairly.
However, 18.4 percent are very positive with the supervisor treating individuals fairly. The
percentage rate of question seven's answers are close.
Question #8 asks if your supervisor’s boss treats the individual’s division fairly. The number of
employees who responded to this question is 77. There is a 27.3 percentage rate of negative
employees and a 19.5 percentage rate of very negative employees. The percentage rates of
non- responsive employees in this question were .05. Management should encourage the
supervisor’s to treat employees fairly and equally. The higher supervisors should read the
survey conducted and learn how to manage the time spent with each employee to boost
fairness. This will allow the supervisors to learn more about the employees individually and treat
each one as an individual.
Question #9 of the survey asked employees how good BIMS is at communicating. The survey
shows a negative overall result in the amount of employees feeling the company lacked
communication at thirty-two percent. The results of the survey shows employees did not chose
number five, very positive, regarding the communication within the company. The average
amount of employees feeling the company lacked communication was a twenty-four percent.
From the results of this survey, BIMS management needs to look at the way managers are
communicating with their staff. It is recommended for BIMS departments to hold weekly staff
meetings to encourage communication within departments. This question should be revisited
once measures are put in place to increase better communication within the company.
Question #10 of the employee survey asks the employees if they do not fear losing their jobs.
The collected data suggests that at least half of employees do fear their jobs are in jeopardy,
rating either a 1 or a 2 on the survey. In fact 50% of employees fear their jobs are at risk and
approximately 32% of employees are a bit more secure in the jobs they currently have giving
ratings of 4 and 5 which translates to a mostly positive job security outlook. Management needs
to take a look at the 50% of employees who have a real fear for the loss of their job and address
their legitimate concerns.
The first eleven survey questions, which are qualitative, are coded Q1 to Q11 across the first
row of columns two through twelve as displayed on the spreadsheet. The last three questions
are coded A to C; with A being qualitative, B being quantitative and C being both qualitative and
quantitative; across the first row of columns thirteen through fifteen on the spreadsheet. The
responses to these four questions are aimed specifically in collecting demographic data. The
demographic data consists of the respondents division, time with the company, and gender. The
respondents division choices are food, housekeeping, and maintenance, indicated by a check-
mark and are coded one two and three respectively. Inputting numerical values into the blank
spaces next to the years and months pertaining to the employee's length of service are required
for B. This quantitative data is coded by converting the years and months into total months. The
gender choices under C are female and male; coded one and two respectively. The procedure
used in coding data collection is accurate for recording survey responses. A consultant was
hired to enter, code, and analyze the data. The data has been analyzed to determine central
tendencies, skew, modes, and standard deviation to establish if the results are significant.
The 78 responses are computed for the 11 questions (Q1 - Q11) and summarized in the
frequency table below. The frequency column refers to the number of observations in that class,
and the class relative frequency shows the percentage. In presenting data in this type of table,

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the highest and lowest scores are located easily for each question. For instance, question 1
(Q1) shows 26 observations for class scale 2 as the highest score. Included below the table are
the mean, median, and mode computed individually for the 11 questions. The mean ranges from
2.21 to 3.12, showing overall that rating 2 as the popular choice made by the 78 respondents.
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5
Scale FREQ % FREQ % FREQ % FREQ % FREQ %
1 10 12.8 10 12.8 14 17.9 10 12.8 12 15.4
2 26 33.3 22 28.2 19 24.4 21 26.9 18 23.1
3 19 24.4 25 32.1 17 21.8 20 25.6 15 19.2
4 14 17.9 11 14.1 14 17.9 12 15.4 15 19.2
5 9 11.5 10 12.8 14 17.9 15 19.2 18 23.1
Total 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0
Mean 2.82 2.86 2.94 3.01 3.12
Median 3 3 3 3 3
Mode 2 3 2 2 5
Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 Q11
Scale FREQ % FREQ % FREQ % FREQ % FREQ % FREQ %
1 11 14.1 17 21.8 16 20.5 13 16.7 16 20.5 18 23.1
2 18 23.1 17 21.8 18 23.1 29 37.2 19 24.4 35 44.9
3 17 21.8 16 20.5 14 17.9 19 24.4 15 19.2 19 24.4
4 17 21.8 17 21.8 15 19.2 11 14.1 17 21.8 3 3.8
5 15 19.2 11 14.1 15 19.2 6 7.7 11 14.1 3 3.8
Total 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0 78 100.0
Mean 3.09 2.85 2.94 2.59 2.85 2.21
Median 3 3 3 2 3 2
Mode 2 4 2 2 2 2
The qualitative data above is shown in a graphical representation below. The following bar
graph displays a total of 858 observations made by 78 respondents for 11 questions. The
highest bar reveals that the respondents' choice favors class 2. This means that overall among
the 11 questions, 242 observations were made immensely in class 2 (Disagree).
The frequency chart refers to the number of observations in the class along with the class
percentage rate. There are 78 correspondents with 11 questions to define. Here are the highest
scores for the 11 questions; Q1-26 observations in scale 2, Q2-25 observations in scale 3, Q3-
19 observations in scale 2, Q4-21 observations in scale 2, Q5-18 observations in scales 2 and
5, Q6-18 observations in scale 2, Q7-17 observations in scales 1,2 and 4, Q8-18 observations
in scale 2, Q9-29 observations in scale 2, Q10-19 observations in scale 2, and Q11-35
observations in scale 2. Scale 2 shows the most observations from the class. Here are the
lowest scores for the 11 questions; Q1- 9 observations in scale 5, Q2- 10 observations in scale
1 and 5, Q3- 14 observations in scale 1,4, and 5, Q4- 10 observations in scale 1, Q5- 12

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Analyzing and Interpreting DataBallard Integrated Managed Services (BIMS) conducted an internal survey for 440 employees, excluding top management, asking 10 questions on morale and four questions on demographics. BIMS upper management noticed a change in staff morale and an increase in the staff turnover rate, which initiated the survey. Barbara Tucker, General Manager, wants to discover what is making employees want to leave and has enlisted the help of Debbie Horner. Debbie Horner, human resources manager for Ballard, created an internal survey in hopes to calculate descriptive and frequency techniques, and study the data for possible relationships. A total of 78 responses were returned, which is a 17.3% response rate (University of Phoenix Week Two Supplement, 2012). All 78 employees answered on a scale of one to five, with one being very negative and five being very positive.Question #1 of the survey asks employees how well they enjoy working for BIMS. Based on the survey data collected, nineteen percent marked that they were very negative about working at BIMS. Twenty six percent of BIMS employees were negative toward enjoying their work. Over 50% of the participants rank ...
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