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APPLICATION OF DATA WAREHOUSE
1. RISK MANAGEMENT
Risk management is the identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks (defined in
ISO 31000 as the effect of uncertainty on objectives, whether positive or negative)
followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor,
and control the probability and/or impact of unfortunate events
[1]
or to maximize the
realization of opportunities. Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets,
project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-
cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters as well as
deliberate attack from an adversary, or events of uncertain or unpredictable root-cause.
Several risk management standards have been developed including the Project
Management Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, actuarial
societies, and ISO standards.
[2][3]
Methods, definitions and goals vary widely according to
whether the risk management method is in the context of project management, security,
engineering, industrial processes, financial portfolios, actuarial assessments, or public
health and safety.
Method
For the most part, these methods consist of the following elements, performed, more or
less, in the following order.
1. identify, characterize, and assess threats
2. assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats
3. determine the risk (i.e. the expected likelihood and consequences of specific types
of attacks on specific assets)
4. identify ways to reduce those risks
5. prioritize risk reduction measures based on a strategy
Principles of risk management
The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) identifies the following
principles of risk management:
[4]
Risk management should:
create value resources expended to mitigate risk should generally exceed the
consequence of inaction, or (as in value engineering), the gain should exceed the
pain
be an integral part of organizational processes
be part of decision making
explicitly address uncertainty and assumptions
be systematic and structured
be based on the best available information

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be tailorable
take into account human factors
be transparent and inclusive
be dynamic, iterative and responsive to change
be capable of continual improvement and enhancement
be continually or periodically re-assessed
2. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Financial analysis (also referred to as financial statement analysis or accounting
analysis or Analysis of finance) refers to an assessment of the viability, stability and
profitability of a business, sub-business or project.
It is performed by professionals who prepare reports using ratios that make use of
information taken from financial statements and other reports. These reports are usually
presented to top management as one of their bases in making business decisions.
Continue or discontinue its main operation or part of its business;
Make or purchase certain materials in the manufacture of its product;
Acquire or rent/lease certain machineries and equipment in the production of its
goods;
Issue stocks or negotiate for a bank loan to increase its working capital;
Make decisions regarding investing or lending capital;
Other decisions that allow management to make an informed selection on various
alternatives in the conduct of its business.
Goals
Financial analysts often assess the following elements of a firm:
1. Profitability - its ability to earn income and sustain growth in both the short- and long-
term. A company's degree of profitability is usually based on the income statement,
which reports on the company's results of operations;
2. Solvency - its ability to pay its obligation to creditors and other third parties in the
long-term;
3. Liquidity - its ability to maintain positive cash flow, while satisfying immediate
obligations;
Both 2 and 3 are based on the company's balance sheet, which indicates the financial
condition of a business as of a given point in time.
4. Stability - the firm's ability to remain in business in the long run, without having to
sustain significant losses in the conduct of its business. Assessing a company's stability
requires the use of both the income statement and the balance sheet, as well as other
financial and non-financial indicators. etc

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APPLICATION OF DATA WAREHOUSE 1. RISK MANAGEMENT Risk management is the identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks (defined in ISO 31000 as the effect of uncertainty on objectives, whether positive or negative) followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact of unfortunate events[1] or to maximize the realization of opportunities. Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets, project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters as well as deliberate attack from an adversary, or events of uncertain or unpredictable root-cause. Several risk management standards have been developed including the Project Management Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, actuarial societies, and ISO standards.[2][3] Methods, definitions and goals vary widely according to whether the risk management method is in the context of project management, security, engineering, industrial processes, financial portfolios, actuarial assessments, or public health and safety. Method For the most part, these methods consist of the following elements, performed, more or less, in the following order. 1. identify, characterize, and assess threats 2. assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats 3. determine the risk (i.e. the expected likelihood and consequ ...
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