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Death By Expertise

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The Death of Expertise
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The Death of Expertise
The society has developed mechanisms of going against the expertise of those who claim to know
something more so than them. The claims that Nichols has stated throughout this article refers to just this.
As this paper will present, claims of the experts are generally not looked upon as being an expert
hypothesis nor are such claims agreed upon or accepted by some in the society. Unfortunately, as Nichols
points out, many people think of the term “democracy” as the complete equality of all people in all
situations ("The Death of Expertise”). This includes all topics, including politics, medicine, and social
science. Nichols states that, while experts are often wrong, someone with more experience and knowledge
on a topic is much less likely to make significant mistakes than a typical, ignorant American. Tom
Nichols’ article “The Death of Expertise,” discusses the modern American’s tendency to disregard
experts’ advice and opinions.
However, many people, when faced with someone who claims to have expertise, knowledge, or
experience, will instantly be on guard and will belligerently deny the “expert’s” knowledge or authority.
“The Death of Expertise” describes this phenomenon as the Dunning-Kruger effect, where the lower
someone’s intelligence, the surer the person is of his or her knowledge and opinion ("The Death of
Expertise”). According to Nichols, an ideal society would involve respect: respect of opinion for all, but
also an acknowledgment and a heeding of higher knowledge and experience.
According to Nicole’s beliefs, people lacks the respect for “experts.” The problem with Nichols’
article is the appeal that authority should be enough to earn respect from others for an argument. In his

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Spring 2017, English 101 class, John Kear taught that an argument should be based on many factors,
ethos, or authority, is only one of them (The Federalist). An argument should be based on what people
know and how a case is presented, not what people claim about themselves and their authority.
Nichols’ article focuses on the people giving the argument and their experience. The response is
just as John Kear predicted in his class. The opposing sides concentrate primarily on the person
presenting the argument and spend all their energy tearing the person down while ignoring the views
presented (The Federalist). Mr. Kear taught that a case should be presented without being given as an
opinion or relying on anything other than the case itself. Thus, while authority and knowledge add an
important factor to discussions, the primary argument should be based on facts and analysis, not on the
people arguing. The Campaign against Established Knowledge and why it Matters (The Federalist).
Nichols knows better than to long for a better time before technology shattered our attention
spans. He quotes Alexis de Tocqueville’s observation from 1835: “In most of the operations of the mind,
each American appeal only to the individual effort of his understanding.” This was basic to Jacksonian
democracy’s operating system, in which citizens were, Tocqueville wrote, “constantly brought back to
their reason as the most obvious and proximate source of truth ("The Death of Expertise”). It is not only
confidence in this or that man which is destroyed, but the disposition to trust the authority of any man
whatsoever.”
The distinction between an independent, rough nonconformist and a full-throated, hawkish nitwit,
as it were, has a tendency to be one of degree and not of kind. (Frequently, it's a matter of when you keep
running into him and under what conditions.) Nichols dedicates a large portion of his book to
distinguishing how 21st-century American life undermines trust in master information and hazy spots the
lines amongst reality and sentiment. Like Christopher Hayes in The Twilight of the Elites, he recognizes
that genuine disappointments and misuse of energy by military, therapeutic, monetary and political
specialists represent a decent arrangement of wariness and negativity toward cases of ability.

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Surname 1 The Death of Expertise Student name: Instructor’s name: Date: The Death of Expertise The society has developed mechanisms of going against the expertise of those who claim to know something more so than them. The claims that Nichols has stated throughout this article refers to just this. As this paper will present, claims of the experts are generally not looked upon as being an expert hypothesis nor are such claims agreed upon or accepted by some in the society. Unfortunately, as Nichols points out, many people think of the term “democracy” as the complete equality of all people in all situations ("The Death of Expertise”). This includes all topics, including politics, medicine, and social science. Nichols states that, while experts are often wrong, someone with more experience and knowledge on a topic is much less likely to make significant mistakes than a typical, ignorant American. Tom Nichols’ article “The Death of Expertise,” discusses the modern American’s tendency to disregard experts’ advice and opinions. However, many people, when faced with someone who claims to have expertise, knowledge, or experience, will instantly be on guard and will belligerently deny the “expert’s” knowledge or authority. “The Death of Expertise” describes this phenomenon as the Dunning-Kruger effect, where the lower someone’s intelligence, the surer the person is of his or her knowledge and opinion ("The Death of Expertise”). According to Nichols, an ...
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