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SCI 245 Earthquakes WK 3.

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Earthquakes 1
Earthquakes
Axia College

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Earthquakes 2
Earthquakes
Earthquakes are defined as a series of vibrations found in the earth’s crust including
rupture and the rebound of rocks. Some may define it as the Earth releasing stress, causing a
sudden movement of the crust. This “stress” may be caused by volcanoes or other geologic
faults. Shock waves are generated by the movement of rock masses deep within the crust of the
Earth, usually near tectonic plates, which are also common causes of earthquakes. A plate
margin is known as the meeting place of one plate with another plate. There are two different
types of plate margins, which are convergent margins and divergent margins. Convergent
margins are boundaries in which two plates move towards one another and come together
(Murck, Skinner, and Mackenzie 2008). This can lead to different types of margins, depending
on whether the boundary is between two oceanic plates, two continental plates, or one of each.
Divergent margins are the opposite, as they are boundaries along which two plates are moving
apart (Murck, et al. 2008). They are liable to occur in oceanic crust, as well as continental.
Earthquakes are found to be more common along these plate margins and are shown as the most
active plate margins. An earthquake may occur at either plate margin, and a volcano may be
found among both of the plate margins.
Quake and Shake
For the most part, earthquakes are found to be caused by the abrupt movement of the
Earth’s crust along a fault line (Murck, et al., 2008, p118). If the rocks were to slide past one
another causing a collision, catastrophic earthquakes such as the Sumatra-Andaman would not
take place. It is uncommon for rocks to avoid collision and slide easily past one another.
“Friction between blocks of rocks, cause them to tighten up and grab on to one another, bringing
the motion along the part of the fault to a complete stop” (Murck, et al., 2008. p118). When the

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