Access over 20 million homework & study documents
search

Case study Illinois Institute of Technology

Content type

User Generated

Type

Study Guide

Rating

Showing Page:
1/4
Illinois Institute of Technology.
History 380
Professor.- Val Martin
Name.- Rodolfo Alberto Mares Araiza
Date.- 04/13/11
Assignment # 3: Japan as a case study.
1) Which are the different theories about the origins of the present-day
Japanese?
First of all these theories as the author suggests are subject to debate. The
Japanese for instance are certain that their origins have no relation
whatsoever with Korea and Japan was created based on an ancient
myth, therefore their cultural heritage, language and customs are unique
as well. On the other hand Koreans argue that it was thanks to a massive
immigration wave of technology, new crops, animals and a genetic pool
that modern Japan was born. Either way 3 theories have been postulated
and they are:
1.- The first theory indicates that the “Jomon” people living mostly in
central and northern Japan, lived at some of the highest population
densities of hunter-gatherers and overtime evolved into modern Japan.
I’d like to point out that back then the lifestyle of the Jomon people didn’t
show any signs of stratification, no agriculture was needed because they
obtained nuts, fish, etc. from their natural resources, and also weaponry
wasn’t developed either. Hence the Jomon continued to grow and
eventually after thousands of years they adapted to agriculture, in a way
that when the Yayoi transition begun the Jomon adapted their agriculture
techniques and crops, but no other significant attribute is granted to the
Yayoi.
2.- A second theory suggests that when the Yayoi transition appeared on
the Island of Kyushu, South Korean immigrants brought with themselves a
new array of elements previously unknown to Jomon people. This newly
package included: metal tools, full-scale agriculture methods, culture and
mostly genes; causing an indisputable shift of balance in terms of genetic
contribution between the Yayoi and the Jomon.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/4
3.-Last but not least the third theory accepts the importance of Korean
immigrants in Japan but not in a massive manner. Meaning that indeed a
small group of Yayoi brought with them highly productive agriculture of
rice, lived alongside the Jomon and eventually outnumbered them. Due
basically to the differences in lifestyle, the Yayoi small in numbers were
able to reproduce at a much faster rate, because they could support
and feed larger populations than the Jomon.
The first theory is more appealing to Japanese, because it denies the
influence of Korean habitants in Japan. But the second and third theories
have a greater common ground, which is the introduction of agriculture
among other factors by Korean immigrants
2) How did the Jomon people make their living?
The Jomon people had a unique way of make their living; they were
hunters, gatherers and fishing people. They also were the first potters and
the pottery they developed helped them to reap the benefits of their
resources. They lived in such a rich environment that they could obtain:
Nuts, berries, fruits, seeds, leaves, shoots, bulbs, roots and a wide variety of
seafood, without the need of agriculture for more than 10,000 years.
3) In what ways were the Jomon unusual, in what similar to known
hunter-gatherer populations?
Study of previous known hunter-gatherer populations in Eurasia shows that
hunter-gatherers had a nomadic way of life, meaning they relied on
game animals and they could not support large societies.
Whereas Jomon people had such a unique environment that they could
allow themselves to settle down, make pottery, take advantage from the
resources, support larger populations (up to 250,000) and still be hunter-
gatherers. This sedentary lifestyle was possible due to the short distance
between inland forests, rivers, seashores, bays and open oceans.
If compared with other hunter-gatherers in Eurasia, it was almost
impossible to depend only on available resources, territorial extension was
greater and therefore constant allocation forced them to travel in small
groups and carry a few portable possessions.

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/4

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 4 pages?
Access Now

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Illinois Institute of Technology. History 380 Professor.- Val Martin Name.- Rodolfo Alberto Mares Araiza Date.- 04/13/11 Assignment # 3: Japan as a case study. 1) Which are the different theories about the origins of the present-day Japanese? First of all these theories as the author suggests are subject to debate. The Japanese for instance are certain that their origins have no relation whatsoever with Korea and Japan was created based on an ancient myth, therefore their cultural heritage, language and customs are unique as well. On the other hand Koreans argue that it was thanks to a massive immigration wave of technology, new crops, animals and a genetic pool that modern Japan was born. Either way 3 theories have been postulated and they are: 1.- The first theory indicates that the “Jomon” people living mostly in central and northern Japan, lived at some of the highest population densities of hunter-gatherers and overtime evolved into modern Japan. I’d like to point out that back then the lifestyle of the Jomon people didn’t show any signs of stratification, no agriculture was needed because they obtained nuts, fish, etc. from their natural resources, and also wea ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Just what I needed…Fantastic!

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4