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Giving Artificial Hydration And Nutrition.edited

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Nursing
School
CUNY Hostos Community College
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Homework
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Giving Artificial Hydration and Nutrition
Student’s Name
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Giving Artificial Hydration and Nutrition
Opinion about the scenario
A critical examination of the scenario about artificial hydration and nutrition indicates
certain circumstances when it is valid and invalid. It is vital to acknowledge that the central aim
of artificial hydration and nutrition is to prevent a patient from dehydration and provide the
energy required for the recovery process. In my opinion, it is both valid and invalid depending on
the health condition of the patient. Concerning the scenario, placing a G-tube in a nursing home
patient with end-stage dementia who cannot eat may be unreasonable. One of the reasons for the
decision may be unreasonable is that at this stage, the nurses and the patient's family members
have the knowledge that no matter the medical intervention administered, the patient will not
survive for long.
A good example of a case where artificial hydration and nutrition would be invalid is
where a 90-year old woman in a near vegetative state and under care in a nursing home is to
receive artificial hydration and nutrition. In the above example, it would be advisable to make
the patient comfortable rather than put her on feeding tubes. Notably, the nurses and the family
members of the patient should aim at making the patient comfortable. Additionally, placing a G-
tube in such a patient may result in more complications such as coughing and pneumonia as the
fluid may enter his or her lungs. Also, the patient is likely to get infected and feel pain as feeding
tubes are often uncomfortable.
Additionally, I believe that placing a feeding tube in the stroke patient with an Advance
Directive is justified. As much as nurses and other health professionals are responsible for
providing quality care to patients, there are certain situations when they are barred from doing
so. With an advance directive, nurses cannot place a feeding tube in the stroke patient as it would

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1 Giving Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Student’s Name Institutional Affiliation Date 2 Giving Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Opinion about the scenario A critical examination of the scenario about artificial hydration and nutrition indicates certain circumstances when it is valid and invalid. It is vital to acknowledge that the central aim of artificial hydration and nutrition is to prevent a patient from dehydration and provide the energy required for the recovery process. In my opinion, it is both valid and invalid depending on the health condition of the patient. Concerning the scenario, placing a G-tube in a nursing home patient with end-stage dementia who cannot eat may be unreasonable. One of the reasons for the decision may be unreasonable is that at this stage, the nurses and the patient's family members have the knowledge that no matter the medical intervention administered, the patient will not survive for long. A good example of a case where artificial hydration and nutrition would be invalid is where a 90-year old woman in a near vegetative state and under care in a nursing home is to receive artificial hydration and nutrition. In the above example, it wo ...
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