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Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl 22

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Analyzing Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl under the Feminist Theory
Feminist theory studies women's rights from a fictional, mythological, or conceptual
perspective. A woman's most representative slave narrative is probably Incidents in the Life of a
Slave Girl. It is an essential literary and primary source for readers who want to better
understand or deal with the many aspects of slavery, particularly the experience of female slaves.
Jacobs engages readers in her notebook as a woman and mother, detailing her delinquency and
maltreatment as a slave. However, in terms of narrative power and authority, the legitimacy of
the slave story is only secondary to the primary purpose of the slave story, to criticize racial
inequality. When analyzing Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl under feminist theory, Jacob
exposes issues of misogyny and patriarchy, as she constantly is belittled by the superiority of
men.
Jacobs takes full advantage of her words and her experiences as a slave to bring out the
feminist in both men and women, particularly in white, Northern women. She hopes to elicit "an
abolitionist voice [that] she, a slave mother, is relying on her white, Northern, female readers to
discover within themselves" (Blackford 314). She tells a story of torture, loss of innocence, and
triumph in the hopes that her readers will stand up to wrongdoers and become unblinded by other
white men's laws of respectability. To protect her children and their children's children, Jacobs
wrote incidents, which aimed to appeal to the feminist and humanist in each reader. She says that
" It was critical for me to take responsibility for myself to protect my children." (Machado and

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Daisy 167). This shows that gaining freedom as an enslaved woman was difficult because it
required a large sum of money and the permission of one's lord. Jacobs is a feminist in that she
wishes for a better life for her daughter and all future daughters. Jacobs had no desire for either
of her children to be enslaved. "I'd rather my children be half-starved paupers in Ireland than the
most pampered slaves in America ten thousand times" (Jacobs et al. 34). Jacobs had witnessed
firsthand the heinous acts committed against slaves, particularly slave women, and she didn't
want that to happen to her children. She appealed to the reader for compassion in response to her
strong feelings about her children, particularly her daughter, being enslaved. To shed light on the
secrets of the southern white man, she told stories about her mistreatment and how she was
"compelled to drink the cup of sin" (29). She was well aware that this treatment would be passed
down through the generations, and she believed that Northern women were her best hope for
help and relief from this dreadful life of servitude.
Harriet Jacobs uses the pen name Brent to depict her childhood as a slave in a white
residence in her short story, Harriet Jacobs. It highlights the vulnerabilities and moral plight of
black women who are helpless in the face of sexual abuse by white men. Women's rights were
the goal of the feminist movement. In Slave Narratives, both black and white women are
fictitious and objective. White women are idealized as pure, angelic, and loyal, while black
women are idealized as having exotic and barbaric sexuality. Harriet Jacobs brought the sexual
repression of an enslaved black woman into the public and political spotlight in the life of a slave
girl. Harriet Jacobs takes a significant risk by writing about her experience as a domestic servant
in the South and a refugee in the North. The incident in the life of slavery is a true story of the
brutality of slavery towards women. During Jacobs' time, this viewpoint was kept under wraps.
Jacobs' story focuses on racial oppression, featuring many strong and often outspoken female

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Surname: 1 Student Name Supervisor Name Course Name Due Date Analyzing Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl under the Feminist Theory Feminist theory studies women's rights from a fictional, mythological, or conceptual perspective. A woman's most representative slave narrative is probably Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. It is an essential literary and primary source for readers who want to better understand or deal with the many aspects of slavery, particularly the experience of female slaves. Jacobs engages readers in her notebook as a woman and mother, detailing her delinquency and maltreatment as a slave. However, in terms of narrative power and authority, the legitimacy of the slave story is only secondary to the primary purpose of the slave story, to criticize racial inequality. When analyzing Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl under feminist theory, Jacob exposes issues of misogyny and patriarchy, as she constantly is belittled by the superiority of men. Jacobs takes full advantage of her words and her experiences as a slave to bring out the feminist in both men and women, particularly in white, Northern women. She hopes to elicit "an abolitionist voice [that] she, a slave mother, is relying on her white, Northern, female readers to discover within themselves" (Blackford 314). She tells a story of torture, loss of innocence, and triumph in the hopes that her readers will stand up to wrongdoers and become unblinded by other white men's laws of respectability. ...
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