Showing Page:
1/4
Chapter 5
Project Management Knowledge Areas
1. Effective project management requires planning, communication, and task management.
2. The project management knowledge areas are essentially what you need to know about
effective project management.
i. Project Integration management
ii. Project Scope Management
iii. Project Time Management
iv. Project Cost Management
v. Project Quality Management
vi. Project Resource Management
vii. Project Communication Management
viii. Project Risk Management
ix. Project Procurement Management
x. Project Stakeholders Management
Project Management Group Process
It includes the following process:
i. Initiating phase
The initiating phase of the project life cycle consists of just two separate processes: the project
charter and stakeholder register. The point of this phase is to determine the vision for your
project, document what you hope to accomplish, and secure approvals from a sanctioning
stakeholder.
ii. Planning phase
The planning phase process group is where you build the project infrastructure that will enable
you to achieve your goal within your predetermined time and budget constraints, starting with a
project management plan, project scope, work breakdown structure and moreand wrapping up
with qualitative and quantitative risk analyses and risk responses. This is your detailed
roadmapyour blueprint for success. When you reach the end of this phase of the life cycle,
everyone on your team will not only understand the vision of the project, they’ll also understand
precisely what they need to do to reach the finish line on time and within budget.
Showing Page:
2/4
Chapter 5
iii. Executing phase
The executing phase is where the rubber hits the roadwhere most of the budget is allocated and
most of the project deliverables are produced. You take your project plan and put it into action,
whether that takes weeks, months, or even years. The goal of this phase is as, “managing teams
effectively while obtaining timeline expectations and reaching to target goals.” The executing
phase often includes team development, stakeholder engagement, and quality assurance
activities, either on a formal or informal basis.
iv. Monitoring and controlling phase
The monitoring and controlling phase involves keeping an eye on the actual progress of the
project against your plan and taking corrective action where necessary. No amount of perfect
planning will exempt you from the need to be constantly vigilant with tracking and reporting.
You know what they say about the best-laid plans, after all.
v. Closing phase
The closing phase is the final phase of the project life cycle includes just one solitary process,
and it’s more than simply checking off the project as done. It’s essential to formally close the
project and secure a sign-off or approval from the customer, stakeholders, and/or project sponsor.
This process might include:
Project Charter:
A project charter is a formal, typically short document that describes your project in its entirety
including what the objectives are, how it will be carried out, and who the stakeholders are. It
is a crucial component in planning the project because it is used throughout the project lifecycle.
The project charter typically documents:
i. Reasons for the project ii. Objectives and constraints of the project
iii. The main stakeholders iv. Risks identified
v. Benefits of the project vi. General overview of the budget
Statement of Work in Project Management
1. A Statement of Work (SOW) is a formal document that defines the entire scope of work
involved for a vendor and clarifies deliverables, costs, and timeline.\
Showing Page:
3/4
Chapter 5
2. It is needed when a project involves vendors and external contributors in addition to the
internal project team. You usually create a SOW as part of a bid document or part of a
contract.
3. It is vital that the SOW is clear to all stakeholders in order to clarify the metrics for
success and avoid disputes involving deliverables, budgets, or timelines.
The statement of work should include:
All deliverables and due dates
The individual tasks that lead to the deliverable, and who these tasks are assigned to
The resources needed for the project including facilities, equipment, and QA procedures
The governance process for the project
Costs and deadlines for payment
Estimation of efforts and cost:
Effort estimation is the process of forecasting how much effort is required to develop or maintain
a software application. This effort is traditionally measured in the hours worked by a person, or
the money needed to pay for this work. Effort estimation is used to help draft project plans and
budgets in the early stages of the software development life cycle.
Methods for estimation of efforts and cost:
1. Expert judgment
Expert judgment is a technique in the project planning process that refers to making a judgment
based on skill, expertise, or specialized knowledge in a particular area. The expertise can be
based on an individual’s training or educational background, career experience, or knowledge of
the product/market.
This expertise can come from:
A member of the project team
A project stakeholder
Consultants
Showing Page:
4/4
Chapter 5
Subject matter experts
The project manager, etc.
Expert judgment can help when forming strategies around threat and risk response. It can also
identify project opportunities. While expert judgment estimation is useful in the planning
process, it is not a perfect technique.
2. Use Case Points
1. Use Case Points (UCP) is an estimation method that provides the ability to estimate an
application’s size and effort from its use cases.
2. A use case is a description of all the ways an end-user wants to use” a system. OR
A Use-Case is a series of related interactions between a user and a system that enables the
user to achieve a goal.
3. Use case modeling is an accepted and widespread technique to capture the business
processes and requirements of a software application. Moreover, the time to complete the
application is affected by:
i. The number of steps to complete the use case.
ii. The number and complexity of the actors.
iii. The technical requirements of the use case such as concurrency, security and
performance.
iv. Various environmental factors such as the development teams’ experience and
knowledge.
3. Function Point
Function Point (FP) is an element of software development which helps to
approximate the cost of development early in the process. It may measures
functionality from user’s point of view.
Further, it is used to measure the software project development along with its
maintenance, consistently throughout the project irrespective of the tools and the
technologies.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Chapter 5 Project Management Knowledge Areas 1. Effective project management requires planning, communication, and task management. 2. The project management knowledge areas are essentially what you need to know about effective project management. i. Project Integration management ii. Project Scope Management iii. Project Time Management iv. Project Cost Management v. Project Quality Management vi. Project Resource Management vii. Project Communication Management viii. Project Risk Management ix. Project Procurement Management x. Project Stakeholders Management Project Management Group Process It includes the following process: i. Initiating phase The initiating phase of the project life cycle consists of just two separate processes: the project charter and stakeholder register. The point of this phase is to determine the vision for your project, document what you hope to accomplish, and secure approvals from a sanctioning stakeholder. ii. Planning phase The planning phase process group is where you build the project infrastructure that will enable you to achieve your goal within your predetermined time and budget constraints, starting with a project management plan, project scope, work breakdown structure and more—and wrapping up with qualitative and quantitative risk analyses and risk responses. This is your detailed roadmap—your blueprint for success. When you reach the end of this phase of the life cycle, everyone on your team will not only understand the vision of the project, they’ll also understand precisely what they need to do to reach the finish line on time and within budget. Chapter 5 iii. Executing phase The executing phase is where the rubber hits the road—where most of the budget is allocated and most of the project deliverables are produced. You take your project plan and put it into action, whether that takes weeks, months, or even years. The goal of this phase is as, “managing teams effectively while obtaining timeline expectations and reaching to target goals.” The executing phase often includes team development, stakeholder engagement, and quality assurance activities, either on a formal or informal basis. iv. Monitoring and controlling phase The monitoring and controlling phase involves keeping an eye on the actual progress of the project against your plan and taking corrective action where necessary. No amount of perfect planning will exempt you from the need to be constantly vigilant with tracking and reporting. You know what they say about the best-laid plans, after all. v. Closing phase The closing phase is the final phase of the project life cycle includes just one solitary process, and it’s more than simply checking off the project as done. It’s essential to formally close the project and secure a sign-off or approval from the customer, stakeholders, and/or project sponsor. This process might include: Project Charter: A project charter is a formal, typically short document that describes your project in its entirety — including what the objectives are, how it will be carried out, and who the stakeholders are. It is a crucial component in planning the project because it is used throughout the project lifecycle. The project charter typically documents: i. Reasons for the project iii. The main stakeholders v. Benefits of the project ii. Objectives and constraints of the project iv. Risks identified vi. General overview of the budget Statement of Work in Project Management 1. A Statement of Work (SOW) is a formal document that defines the entire scope of work involved for a vendor and clarifies deliverables, costs, and timeline.\ Chapter 5 2. It is needed when a project involves vendors and external contributors in addition to the internal project team. You usually create a SOW as part of a bid document or part of a contract. 3. It is vital that the SOW is clear to all stakeholders in order to clarify the metrics for success and avoid disputes involving deliverables, budgets, or timelines. The statement of work should include: • All deliverables and due dates • The individual tasks that lead to the deliverable, and who these tasks are assigned to • The resources needed for the project including facilities, equipment, and QA procedures • The governance process for the project • Costs and deadlines for payment Estimation of efforts and cost: Effort estimation is the process of forecasting how much effort is required to develop or maintain a software application. This effort is traditionally measured in the hours worked by a person, or the money needed to pay for this work. Effort estimation is used to help draft project plans and budgets in the early stages of the software development life cycle. Methods for estimation of efforts and cost: 1. Expert judgment Expert judgment is a technique in the project planning process that refers to making a judgment based on skill, expertise, or specialized knowledge in a particular area. The expertise can be based on an individual’s training or educational background, career experience, or knowledge of the product/market. This expertise can come from: • A member of the project team • A project stakeholder • Consultants Chapter 5 • Subject matter experts • The project manager, etc. Expert judgment can help when forming strategies around threat and risk response. It can also identify project opportunities. While expert judgment estimation is useful in the planning process, it is not a perfect technique. 2. Use Case Points 1. Use Case Points (UCP) is an estimation method that provides the ability to estimate an application’s size and effort from its use cases. 2. A use case is a description of all the ways an end-user wants to “use” a system. OR A Use-Case is a series of related interactions between a user and a system that enables the user to achieve a goal. 3. Use case modeling is an accepted and widespread technique to capture the business processes and requirements of a software application. Moreover, the time to complete the application is affected by: i. ii. iii. The number of steps to complete the use case. The number and complexity of the actors. The technical requirements of the use case such as concurrency, security and performance. iv. Various environmental factors such as the development teams’ experience and knowledge. 3. Function Point Function Point (FP) is an element of software development which helps to approximate the cost of development early in the process. It may measures functionality from user’s point of view. Further, it is used to measure the software project development along with its maintenance, consistently throughout the project irrespective of the tools and the technologies. Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4