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Understanding Nutritional
Needs of Patients With
Eating Disorders
What are eating disorders?
- Eating disorders are serious mental health disorders. They
involve severe problems with your thoughts about food and
your eating behaviors. You may eat much less or much more
than you need.
- Eating disorders are medical conditions; they are not a
lifestyle choice. They affect your body's ability to get proper
nutrition. This can lead to health issues, such as heart and
kidney problems, or sometimes even death. But there are
treatments that can help.
Common types of eating disorders include:
1. Binge-eating, which is out-of-control eating. People with
binge-eating disorder keep eating even after they are full. They
often eat until they feel very uncomfortable. Afterward, they
usually have feelings of guilt, shame, and distress. Eating too
much too often can lead to weight gain and obesity.
2. Bulimia nervosa. People with bulimia nervosa also have
periods of binge-eating. But afterwards, they purge, by making
themselves throw up or using laxatives. They may also over-
exercise or fast. People with bulimia nervosa may be slightly
underweight, normal weight, or overweight.
3. Anorexia nervosa. People with anorexia nervosa avoid food,
severely restrict food, or eat very small quantities of only
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certain foods. They may see themselves as overweight, even
when they are dangerously underweight. Anorexia nervosa is
the least common of the three eating disorders, but it is often
the most serious. It has the highest death rate of any mental
disorder.
What causes eating disorders?
- The exact cause of eating disorders is unknown. Researchers
believe that eating disorders are caused by a complex
interaction of factors. These include genetic, biological,
behavioral, psychological, and social factors.
Who is at risk for eating disorders?
Anyone can develop an eating disorder, but they are more
common in women. Eating disorders frequently appear during
the teen years or young adulthood. But people can also develop
them during childhood or later in life.
These eating disorders can actually:
• Interfere with your daily functioning (physical, psychological,
and relational)
• Be a serious threat to your life
• Be biologically based
Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and
avoidant restricted food intake disorder are examples of eating
disorders. They have the greatest mental disease mortality rate,
second only to drug addiction disorders. A host of eating
disorder complications, which affect multiple organ systems
and compromise health, are related to nutrition. The fact that
eating disorders are biologically based underscores the key
role nutrition plays in vulnerability, onset, severity, and
duration. With anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and avoidant
restricted food intake disorder, malnutrition is a problem due to
the under-consumption of energy-producing macro nutrients
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(carbohydrates, proteins, fats) and/or micro nutrients relative
to individual demand. Furthermore, eating disorder behaviors
may have an impact on micro nutrient availability (vitamins and
minerals). Overt vitamin deficiencies (e.g., anemia), persistent
weariness, decreased immunological function, loss of lean
body mass, and impaired cognitive function might all be the
outcome. Inflammatory illnesses, such as cardiovascular
disease, diabetes, and various malignancies, may potentially be
a concern for patients.
Energy needs in nutritional
rehabilitation
- The energy needs of a patient with an eating disorder are
challenging to predict with accuracy. Energy needs may be
complicated by acute or chronic starvation, physical activity,
medication, and disease-related behaviors or comorbidity. No
single formula exists for calculating resting metabolic rate
among patients who have eating disorders.
- Treatment plans for eating disorders are tailored to individual
needs. You will likely have a team of providers helping you,
including doctors, nutritionists, nurses, and therapists. The
treatments may include:
Individual, group, and/or family psychotherapy. Individual
therapy may include cognitive behavioral approaches, which
help you to identify and change negative and unhelpful thoughts.
It also helps you build coping skills and change behavioral
patterns.
Medical care and monitoring, including care for the
complications that eating disorders can cause
Nutrition counseling. Doctors, nurses, and counselors will help
you eat healthy to reach and maintain a healthy weight.
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Medicines, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood
stabilizers, may help treat some eating disorders. The medicines
can also help with the depression and anxiety symptoms that
often go along with eating disorders.
REFERENCES:
https://medlineplus.gov/eatingdisorders.html
https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/understanding-
nutritional-needs-patients-eating-disorders-implications-
psychiatrists
https://www.eatright.org/health/diseases-and-conditions/eating-
disorders/understanding-eating-disorders

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Understanding Nutritional Needs of Patients With Eating Disorders What are eating disorders? - Eating disorders are serious mental health disorders. They involve severe problems with your thoughts about food and your eating behaviors. You may eat much less or much more than you need. - Eating disorders are medical conditions; they are not a lifestyle choice. They affect your body's ability to get proper nutrition. This can lead to health issues, such as heart and kidney problems, or sometimes even death. But there are treatments that can help. Common types of eating disorders include: 1. Binge-eating, which is out-of-control eating. People with binge-eating disorder keep eating even after they are full. They often eat until they feel very uncomfortable. Afterward, they usually have feelings of guilt, shame, and distress. Eating too much too often can lead to weight gain and obesity. 2. Bulimia nervosa. People with bulimia nervosa also have periods of binge-eating. But afterwards, they purge, by making themselves throw up or using laxatives. They may also overexercise or fast. People with bulimia nervosa may be slightly underweight, normal weight, or overweight. 3. Anorexia nervosa. People with anorexia nervosa avoid food, severely restrict food, or eat very small quantities of only certain foods. They may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. Anorexia nervosa is the least common of the three eating disorders, but it is often the most serious. It has the highest death rate of any mental disorder. What causes eating disorders? - The exact cause of eating disorders is unknown. Researchers believe that eating disorders are caused by a complex interaction of factors. These include genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Who is at risk for eating disorders? Anyone can develop an eating disorder, but they are more common in women. Eating disorders frequently appear during the teen years or young adulthood. But people can also develop them during childhood or later in life. These eating disorders can actually: • Interfere with your daily functioning (physical, psychological, and relational) • Be a serious threat to your life • Be biologically based Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and avoidant restricted food intake disorder are examples of eating disorders. They have the greatest mental disease mortality rate, second only to drug addiction disorders. A host of eating disorder complications, which affect multiple organ systems and compromise health, are related to nutrition. The fact that eating disorders are biologically based underscores the key role nutrition plays in vulnerability, onset, severity, and duration. With anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and avoidant restricted food intake disorder, malnutrition is a problem due to the under-consumption of energy-producing macro nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fats) and/or micro nutrients relative to individual demand. Furthermore, eating disorder behaviors may have an impact on micro nutrient availability (vitamins and minerals). Overt vitamin deficiencies (e.g., anemia), persistent weariness, decreased immunological function, loss of lean body mass, and impaired cognitive function might all be the outcome. Inflammatory illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and various malignancies, may potentially be a concern for patients. Energy needs in nutritional rehabilitation - The energy needs of a patient with an eating disorder are challenging to predict with accuracy. Energy needs may be complicated by acute or chronic starvation, physical activity, medication, and disease-related behaviors or comorbidity. No single formula exists for calculating resting metabolic rate among patients who have eating disorders. - Treatment plans for eating disorders are tailored to individual needs. You will likely have a team of providers helping you, including doctors, nutritionists, nurses, and therapists. The treatments may include: ⚫ Individual, group, and/or family psychotherapy. Individual therapy may include cognitive behavioral approaches, which help you to identify and change negative and unhelpful thoughts. It also helps you build coping skills and change behavioral patterns. ⚫ Medical care and monitoring, including care for the complications that eating disorders can cause ⚫ Nutrition counseling. Doctors, nurses, and counselors will help you eat healthy to reach and maintain a healthy weight. ⚫ Medicines, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers, may help treat some eating disorders. The medicines can also help with the depression and anxiety symptoms that often go along with eating disorders. REFERENCES: https://medlineplus.gov/eatingdisorders.html https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/understandingnutritional-needs-patients-eating-disorders-implicationspsychiatrists https://www.eatright.org/health/diseases-and-conditions/eatingdisorders/understanding-eating-disorders Name: Description: ...
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