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How does Wordsworth view Lucy in ...She Dwelt Among the
Untrodden Ways?
By Tadiwa Mudyahoto
Analyse the question carefully and use quotations appropriately. You will be penalized for
downloading information without using your own words...
She dwelt among the untrodden ways is a romantic and sad poem about how life is when you
are unnoticed and alone. The writer Wordsworth is the only person in the whole world who
noticed physically an intellectually distant Lucy.
The first line being She dwelt among the untrodden ways” portrays so much emotion and
fervour. The writer depicts how alone she was and vulnerable she could have been, yet the line
can be perceived as multifarious. The line can be received as a journey she is taking that is too
hard for anyone ordinary to endure. It can be delivered as someone who is alone in the world
with no one to love and care for and vice versa. This line can be taken in so many different ways
and because, of this, is can also be taken (from an outsider looking at the writer’s prospect) as
the writer still wanting to hold on to this girl, him not being ready to share a part of himself and
herself to the world. He wants to hold on just a little bit longer. The emotion in this line is so
present, that it is the perfect line to show the writer’s view on this mystery girl, who is adored
by him.
In the first stanza the writer, Wordsworth, is very vague on his description on the mystery girl
but, he shows his adoration by describing the surroundings that are around her. He gives them
a gentle and straightforward description insinuating, that she may be of the same character,
lovely and gentle but isolated and alone. His view of her in the first stanza is nothing short but
a sweet dedication to her. The words he uses such as “springs of dove” represents the beauty
of the place she lives in, as well as its simplicity, also, as metaphorically describing the
personality of the mystery girl. The writer is giving us a preview into the life of the mystery girl,
and yet, it is like he is cushioning with the first few lines of the stanza being something that
describes happiness and beautiful things, whereas, the last line tells us despite all of this she
was alone both physically and mentally and there was no one to love her, or for her to love, “A
maid whom there were none to praise and very few to love”.
In the second stanza Wordsworth, is revealing a little bit more about the mystery girl, but with
more adoration and love for her. As in the first stanza he is using something else as a vessel for
her beauty, a metaphor to describe her inner and outer beauty as well as her blooming
personality. “A violet by a mossy stone half hidden from the eye”, A metaphor for the girl’s
personality. The writer views the girl as someone who you can never see fully. She is always
hiding a part of herself. The writer views her as a beautiful soul who hides behind her
appearance so no one can know her true personality. The only person who tried to get to know
her and really observed her was the writer. “Fair as a star, when only one is shining in the sky”
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is a metaphor for her beauty and what her beauty means to the writer and how it makes him
feel. The writer marvels at her beauty, but is sad that, to others she is ordinary. When she is
among many, she is seemingly unimportant and goes unnoticed because people would not care
to look closer and see the beauty that the writer sees. The beauty that mesmerises him and
makes him want to know more about this mystery girl. The second stanza in summary
compares the mystery girl to the beauty and grace of nature. He uses nature as it is a close
comparison to her gentleness and elegance. Nature is the closest human comparison he can
think of to compare with her and to make people understand how he viewed her as a person.
The writer has finally opened up and told us the name of the mystery girl, Lucy. In a way the
poem is a journey for him, a journey of grief, as he gets comfortable talking about Lucy again. In
the first line of the Third stanza “She lived unknown, and few could know”, the writer is trying to
remind us that she lived alone. The writer has been speaking very highly of Lucy in the last
stanza and he just wanted to prepare us for the next words he was going to say, “When Lucy
ceased to be. Lucy has seemingly died and few to none knew about it. “But she is in her grave”
this line shows us that Wordsworth had finally made peace with the death of Lucy, a person he
loved dearly. He had realised that it was no use moping about her death as she was already in
her grave and there was nothing, he could do to change that. “And, oh, the difference to me!”
Her death changed him, because of how he viewed Lucy, as a wonderful person who was
misunderstood and unnoticed. The last line signifies how his view on this girl made him feel
after she died. Wordsworth felt extremely sad because, now no one could ever see her true
beauty.

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How does Wordsworth view Lucy in ...She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways? By Tadiwa Mudyahoto Analyse the question carefully and use quotations appropriately. You will be penalized for downloading information without using your own words... She dwelt among the untrodden ways is a romantic and sad poem about how life is when you are unnoticed and alone. The writer Wordsworth is the only person in the whole world who noticed physically an intellectually distant Lucy. The first line being “She dwelt among the untrodden ways” portrays so much emotion and fervour. The writer depicts how alone she was and vulnerable she could have been, yet the line can be perceived as multifarious. The line can be received as a journey she is taking that is too hard for anyone ordinary to endure. It can be delivered as someone who is alone in the world with no one to love and care for and vice versa. This line can be taken in so many different ways and because, of this, is can also be taken (from an outsider looking at the writer’s prospect) as the writer still wanting to hold on to this girl, him not being ready to share a part of himself and herself to the world. He wants to hold on just a little bit longer. The emotion in this line is so present, that it is the perfect line to show the writer’s view on this mystery girl, who is adored by him. In the first stanza the writer, Wordsworth, is very vague on his description on the mystery girl but, he shows his adoration by describing the surroundings that are around her. He gives them a gentle and straightforward description insinuating, that she may be of the same character, lovely and gentle but isolated and alone. His view of her in the first stanza is nothing short but a sweet dedication to her. The words he uses such as “springs of dove” represents the beauty of the place she lives in, as well as its simplicity, also, as metaphorically describing the personality of the mystery girl. The writer is giving us a preview into the life of the mystery girl, and yet, it is like he is cushioning with the first few lines of the stanza being something that describes happiness and beautiful things, whereas, the last line tells us despite all of this she was alone both physically and mentally and there was no one to love her, or for her to love, “A maid whom there were none to praise and very few to love”. In the second stanza Wordsworth, is revealing a little bit more about the mystery girl, but with more adoration and love for her. As in the first stanza he is using something else as a vessel for her beauty, a metaphor to describe her inner and outer beauty as well as her blooming personality. “A violet by a mossy stone half hidden from the eye”, A metaphor for the girl’s personality. The writer views the girl as someone who you can never see fully. She is always hiding a part of herself. The writer views her as a beautiful soul who hides behind her appearance so no one can know her true personality. The only person who tried to get to know her and really observed her was the writer. “Fair as a star, when only one is shining in the sky” is a metaphor for her beauty and what her beauty means to the writer and how it makes him feel. The writer marvels at her beauty, but is sad that, to others she is ordinary. When she is among many, she is seemingly unimportant and goes unnoticed because people would not care to look closer and see the beauty that the writer sees. The beauty that mesmerises him and makes him want to know more about this mystery girl. The second stanza in summary compares the mystery girl to the beauty and grace of nature. He uses nature as it is a close comparison to her gentleness and elegance. Nature is the closest human comparison he can think of to compare with her and to make people understand how he viewed her as a person. The writer has finally opened up and told us the name of the mystery girl, Lucy. In a way the poem is a journey for him, a journey of grief, as he gets comfortable talking about Lucy again. In the first line of the Third stanza “She lived unknown, and few could know”, the writer is trying to remind us that she lived alone. The writer has been speaking very highly of Lucy in the last stanza and he just wanted to prepare us for the next words he was going to say, “When Lucy ceased to be”. Lucy has seemingly died and few to none knew about it. “But she is in her grave” this line shows us that Wordsworth had finally made peace with the death of Lucy, a person he loved dearly. He had realised that it was no use moping about her death as she was already in her grave and there was nothing, he could do to change that. “And, oh, the difference to me!” Her death changed him, because of how he viewed Lucy, as a wonderful person who was misunderstood and unnoticed. The last line signifies how his view on this girl made him feel after she died. Wordsworth felt extremely sad because, now no one could ever see her true beauty. Name: Description: ...
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