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Climate Change 1
Climate Change and the Chaparral Ecosystem
By Ragdan Hameed
San Diego State University

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Climate Change 2
Introduction
Climate Change is one of the most pertinent threats to the survival of the planet’s
(organismal?) diversity. Through the diverse meteorological changes that are associated with this
process, the world’s different species and biomes become threatened because the conditions to
which they are used are being radically transformed. For humanity, this represents a significant
challenge to its survival. Despite human activity being one of the main catalysts for this process,
the climatic changes associated with this process has the possibility of altering its future, along
with that of all other species (MacDonald & Sertorio, 2013). Though climate change is a global
phenomenon, capable of altering the conditions across all types of biomes, the way in which it
affects each area is different. In other words, the tundra and the rainforest will be affected
differently and see different changes. The chaparral will also see its own unique challenges when
it comes to enduring Climate Change.
The chaparral is a specific type of forest that is characterized by the presence of shrubs.
This type of biome covers the lower elevations of the Coast Ranges, the west slope of the Sierra
Nevada, and the Transverse and Peninsular ranges of southern California (Rundel, 2018). In
California, the chaparral represents a total of 9% of its wild vegetation (Rundel, 2018). Generally
dry, the chaparral does not see much rainfall during its dry season, which can last between 4 to 6
months in length (Rundel, 2018). The vegetation that grows in this area has become accustomed
to the low amount of water that is received, making it possible for them to thrive in this
environment. Just like they have adapted to the limited water availability, these plants have also
developed adaptations to help the cope with the wildfires that can occur frequently in the region,
due to its dryness. Regarding temperature, the chaparral is characterized by the possession of a
temperate climate. Temperature extremes are rare, but it is possible for the temperature to drop to

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Climate Change 1 Climate Change and the Chaparral Ecosystem By Ragdan Hameed San Diego State University Climate Change 2 Introduction Climate Change is one of the most pertinent threats to the survival of the planet’s (organismal?) diversity. Through the diverse meteorological changes that are associated with this process, the world’s different species and biomes become threatened because the conditions to which they are used are being radically transformed. For humanity, this represents a significant challenge to its survival. Despite human activity being one of the main catalysts for this process, the climatic changes associated with this process has the possibility of altering its future, along with that of all other species (MacDonald & Sertorio, 2013). Though climate change is a global phenomenon, capable of altering the conditions across all types of biomes, the way in which it affects each area is different. In other words, the tundra and the rainforest will be affected differently and see different changes. The chaparral will also see its own unique challenges when it comes to enduring Climate Change. The chaparral is a specific type of forest that is characterized by the presence of shrubs. This type of biome covers the lower elevations of the Coast Ranges, the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, and the Transverse and Peninsular ranges of southern California (Rundel, 2018). In California, the chaparral represents a total of 9% of its wild vegetation (Rundel, 20 ...
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