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New Buddhism Religion

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New Buddhism religion 1
New Buddhism Religion
Buddhism is a religion that originated in India from the teachings of the Gautama
Buddha, known as the "Buddha." The religion bases itself on His original teachings, which are
the core substratum of Buddhism. The Buddha emphasizes the four truths that guide Buddhism's
reality to life by exploring human suffering
1
. The first noble truth is the existence of suffering.
Suffering is inevitable in human life. It is also universal as all human beings experience pain.
The other truth is that there is always a root for every human suffering. Buddha asserts that
suffering must stem from a cause. According to him, most of the suffering stems from the need
for control and possession. In another truth, Buddha posits that suffering is short-lived and has an
end. The human suffering ceases at some point, giving relief to the people through final
liberation. In the last truth, Buddha advocates the eightfold path to end human suffering. Buddha
also strengthened Buddhism through the universal truths that postulate changes in everything,
cause and effect law, and things not getting lost. However, these teachings have slowly morphed
into new philosophies as the religion spreads to other parts of the world. Regions that powerfully
the Buddhism religion are Japan and China. It is also becoming widespread in the Western
region. The new Buddhism approach deviates from the original teachings with a new secular
dimension. Secular Buddhism is simply non-religious. In most cases, religion has taken a
political and contemporary approach. In Japan, Buddhism priests are under high criticism for
adulterating the religion and reducing it to only burials services
2
. They also utilize the temples to
steer political agendas and promote self-agendas.
1
John, Nelson K. 2013. Experimental Buddhism. University of Hawaii Press
2
Ibid

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New Buddhism Religion Student's Name Institution Affiliation Course Professor's Name Date New Buddhism religion 1 New Buddhism Religion Buddhism is a religion that originated in India from the teachings of the Gautama Buddha, known as the "Buddha." The religion bases itself on His original teachings, which are the core substratum of Buddhism. The Buddha emphasizes the four truths that guide Buddhism's reality to life by exploring human suffering1. The first noble truth is the existence of suffering. Suffering is inevitable in human life. It is also universal as all human beings experience pain. The other truth is that there is always a root for every human suffering. Buddha asserts that suffering must stem from a cause. According to him, most of the suffering stems from the need for control and possession. In another truth, Buddha posits that suffering is short-lived and has an end. The human suffering ceases at some point, giving relief to the people through final liberation. In the last truth, Buddha advocates the eightfold path to end human suffering. Buddha also strengthened Buddhism through the universal truths that postulate changes in everything, cause and effect law, and things not getting lost. However, these teachings have slowly morphed into new philosophies as the religion spreads to other parts of the world. Regions that powerfully the Buddhism religion are Japan and China. It is also becoming widespread in the Western region. The new Buddhism approach devia ...
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