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The two lenses that I’ve selected to further analyze voting rights are history and social
science. I believe using the historical lens and social science lens are the most appropriate for
this topic. The historical lens allows readers to look towards analyzing historical events, while
the social science lens is how readers observe a situation, humans, and the world around us.
Concerning voting rights, the similarities these two lenses have are how the effect of voting
rights changed and affected people over time. The difference between the two starts with how the
historical lens gives specific times and dates when events occurred, whereas social science helps
researchers identify what was being done during the time of the events.
When researching the topic: of voting rights through the historical lens, I found it
extremely important to know when certain events occurred. Dates are exceptionally significant
when looking through the history of voting rights, it is how readers find out when things happen.
For example, as I was conducting my research, I proposed the question “what role did women
play when doing through the voting rights process?” After doing my
research, I discovered that it took decades for women to begin to vote. The women's suffrage
movement started in 1848 and ended on August 26th, 1920.
When we begin to discuss what was being done in those decades to grant women the
opportunity to vote, that’s when we begin to glimpse through the social science lens. While
looking through the social science lens, I’ve discovered that “ In 1848, a group of abolitionist
activistsmostly women, but some mengathered in Seneca Falls, New York to discuss the
problem of women’s rights. They were invited there by the reformers Elizabeth Cady Stanton
and Lucretia Mott…In 1869, a new group called the National Woman Suffrage Association was
founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. They began to fight for a universal-
suffrage amendment to the U.S. Constitution.” This newly found discovery, helped me figure out
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what women were doing. It is satisfying to know that their hard work paid off; inspiring not only
women but other genders, ethnicities, etc. to fight for human rights.
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References
History.com Editors. (2009, October 29). Women's suffrage. History.com. Retrieved February
14, 2022, from https://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/the-fight-for-womens-
suffrage

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The two lenses that I’ve selected to further analyze voting rights are history and social science. I believe using the historical lens and social science lens are the most appropriate for this topic. The historical lens allows readers to look towards analyzing historical events, while the social science lens is how readers observe a situation, humans, and the world around us. Concerning voting rights, the similarities these two lenses have are how the effect of voting rights changed and affected people over time. The difference between the two starts with how the historical lens gives specific times and dates when events occurred, whereas social science helps researchers identify what was being done during the time of the events. When researching the topic: of voting rights through the historical lens, I found it extremely important to know when certain events occurred. Dates are exceptionally significant when looking through the history of voting rights, it is how readers find out when things happen. For example, as I was conducting my research, I proposed the question “what role did women play when doing through the voting rights process?” After doing my research, I discovered that it took decades for women to begin to vote. The women's suffrage movement started in 1848 and ended on August 26th, 1920. When we begin to discuss what was being done in those decades to grant women the opportunity to vote, that’s when we begin to glimpse through the social science lens. While looking through the social science lens, I’ve discovered that “ In 1848, a group of abolitionist activists—mostly women, but some men—gathered in Seneca Falls, New York to discuss the problem of women’s rights. They were invited there by the reformers Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott…In 1869, a new group called the National Woman Suffrage Association was founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. They began to fight for a universalsuffrage amendment to the U.S. Constitution.” This newly found discovery, helped me figure out what women were doing. It is satisfying to know that their hard work paid off; inspiring not only women but other genders, ethnicities, etc. to fight for human rights. References History.com Editors. (2009, October 29). Women's suffrage. History.com. Retrieved February 14, 2022, from https://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/the-fight-for-womenssuffrage Name: Description: ...
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