Showing Page:
1/4
Ethics in Accounting
Student’s Name*
University Affiliation
Course name
Instructors Name
Date*
Showing Page:
2/4
Ethics in Accounting
3.
A.
The AICPA regulates the CPA’s professional conduct, which provides the rules to all members
in executing their professional mandates. However, the issue of whether his sexual assault
allegations should warrant the consideration of his tax preparation as substandard is an unclear
area because the AICPA code does not directly provide guidance related to the situation. It is
believed that the individuals' professional services might only be harmful when the public's spirit
in the accountant's professional integrity is compromised (Jenkins, Popova, & Sheldon, 2020).
Others consider that the gross misbehavior is probably dishonorable to the profession,
notwithstanding its relation to work. Engaging in sexual assault warrants the suspension of the
CPA's professional license until the courts exonerate him. The court verdict, grounded on
evidence, will determine whether the professional body will reinstate his license or not.
B.
Assuming that the CPA is sentenced or pleads guilty to the crime, I would affirmatively say that
the professional body should revoke his license because of violating the "Acts Discreditable
Rule." The rule provides that if a final determination by a court (not subject to appeal) presumes
that the individual has committed a crime or violated any anti-discrimination law, including the
sexual harassment crimes, the agency should reprimand him.
4.
The sexist comments made at CPA, such as saying how femininely she needs to walk, talk, and
dress, wear jewelry and wear make-up surmount to sexual discrimination, which is protected by
the primary federal law, which protects female workers from discrimination grounded on sex.
The law is the 1964 Civil Rights Act, specifically Title VII. The Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission enforces the law by prohibiting discrimination grounded on race, sex, color,
religion, and nationality of origin. No one should be expected to conform to a given gender role
or stereotype and the ignorance by CPA of the sexist comments while supporting criticisms
against her.
6.
The accountant's actions were discreditable under the AICPA conduct code in the principles of
responsibilities, due care, objectivity, integrity, and serving the public interest. The CAP must
complete his tasks as needed and file the company's returns to ensure objectivity and detail. No
client would want to have their returns filed by someone under the influence of unprescribed
drugs. The person can likely have impaired judgment, and this would result in being fired.
8.
The CPA violated AICPA’s code of conduct, which presumes an individual has committed a
discreditable act where a court establishes that the person violated provisions of the Civil Rights
Act (Title VII) and the policies by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. These laws
and policies prohibit discrimination grounded on race, sexual orientation, color, or religion
(Cullinan & Simons, 2017). A CPA is not expected to discriminate against anyone grounded on
any of these protected attributes.
Showing Page:
3/4
11.
A.
The CPA admitted to a discreditable act, which the Civil Rights Act prohibits. The legislation
prohibits any form of discrimination grounded on race, sex, sexual orientation, color, or religion,
or another protected attribute. The partner was biased against men in preference for pretty
women, which is clear discrimination.
B.
The answer would not be the same because the act is not necessarily discreditable but rather an
unethical matter. In this case, while the partner would not be discriminating against any protected
trait, they would be doing the wrong thing, which defines unethical behavior. On the reverse,
ethical behavior would encompass recruiting individuals based on their competency and skills
rather than superficial attributes like "good looks."
C.
AICPA guides the professional conduct of certified public accountants but does not directly
address the duty of reporting other workers' unethical behavior (Jenkins, Popova, & Sheldon,
2020). The legal guidelines for reporting fellow employee's conduct could be sought either in-
house or from an independent firm or accessing the company's whistleblowing resources in case
of misconduct in an organization's officials.
Showing Page:
4/4
References
Cullinan, C., & Simons, K. (2017). What constitutes an act discreditable? An exploratory
study. Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting, 47.
Jenkins, J. G., Popova, V., & Sheldon, M. D. (2020). Monitoring the accounting profession
under the AICPA code of professional conduct: An analysis of state board of accountancy
participation. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, 39(3), 106742.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Ethics in Accounting Student’s Name* University Affiliation Course name Instructors Name Date* Ethics in Accounting 3. A. The AICPA regulates the CPA’s professional conduct, which provides the rules to all members in executing their professional mandates. However, the issue of whether his sexual assault allegations should warrant the consideration of his tax preparation as substandard is an unclear area because the AICPA code does not directly provide guidance related to the situation. It is believed that the individuals' professional services might only be harmful when the public's spirit in the accountant's professional integrity is compromised (Jenkins, Popova, & Sheldon, 2020). Others consider that the gross misbehavior is probably dishonorable to the profession, notwithstanding its relation to work. Engaging in sexual assault warrants the suspension of the CPA's professional license until the courts exonerate him. The court verdict, grounded on evidence, will determine whether the professional body will reinstate his license or not. B. Assuming that the CPA is sentenced or pleads guilty to the crime, I would affirmatively say that the professional body should revoke his license because of violating the "Acts Discreditable Rule." The rule provides that if a final determination by a court (not subject to appeal) presumes that the individual has committed a crime or violated any anti-discrimination law, including the sexual harassment crimes, the agency should reprimand him. 4. The sexist comments made at CPA, such as saying how femininely she needs to walk, talk, and dress, wear jewelry and wear make-up surmount to sexual discrimination, which is protected by the primary federal law, which protects female workers from discrimination grounded on sex. The law is the 1964 Civil Rights Act, specifically Title VII. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission enforces the law by prohibiting discrimination grounded on race, sex, color, religion, and nationality of origin. No one should be expected to conform to a given gender role or stereotype and the ignorance by CPA of the sexist comments while supporting criticisms against her. 6. The accountant's actions were discreditable under the AICPA conduct code in the principles of responsibilities, due care, objectivity, integrity, and serving the public interest. The CAP must complete his tasks as needed and file the company's returns to ensure objectivity and detail. No client would want to have their returns filed by someone under the influence of unprescribed drugs. The person can likely have impaired judgment, and this would result in being fired. 8. The CPA violated AICPA’s code of conduct, which presumes an individual has committed a discreditable act where a court establishes that the person violated provisions of the Civil Rights Act (Title VII) and the policies by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. These laws and policies prohibit discrimination grounded on race, sexual orientation, color, or religion (Cullinan & Simons, 2017). A CPA is not expected to discriminate against anyone grounded on any of these protected attributes. 11. A. The CPA admitted to a discreditable act, which the Civil Rights Act prohibits. The legislation prohibits any form of discrimination grounded on race, sex, sexual orientation, color, or religion, or another protected attribute. The partner was biased against men in preference for pretty women, which is clear discrimination. B. The answer would not be the same because the act is not necessarily discreditable but rather an unethical matter. In this case, while the partner would not be discriminating against any protected trait, they would be doing the wrong thing, which defines unethical behavior. On the reverse, ethical behavior would encompass recruiting individuals based on their competency and skills rather than superficial attributes like "good looks." C. AICPA guides the professional conduct of certified public accountants but does not directly address the duty of reporting other workers' unethical behavior (Jenkins, Popova, & Sheldon, 2020). The legal guidelines for reporting fellow employee's conduct could be sought either inhouse or from an independent firm or accessing the company's whistleblowing resources in case of misconduct in an organization's officials. References Cullinan, C., & Simons, K. (2017). What constitutes an act discreditable? An exploratory study. Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting, 47. Jenkins, J. G., Popova, V., & Sheldon, M. D. (2020). Monitoring the accounting profession under the AICPA code of professional conduct: An analysis of state board of accountancy participation. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, 39(3), 106742. Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4