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NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ARTS
CENTER FOR GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT
Commonwealth Avenue corner Regalado St.
Fairview, Quezon City
PROGRAM : Master in Public Administration
SUBJECT : Environmental and Resource Economic Policy
STUDENT : Ramil A. Alegarbes
PROFESSOR: Dr. Dorothy Lagrada
Republic Act No. 10668, otherwise known as the amended
“Cabotage Law
The problem that the above-mentioned legislation hopes to address is the high logistic costs
and strict restrictions in the transport, import or export cargo to and from the Port of Manila
leading to the lack of meaningful competition, therefore holding back the modernization of the
Philippine Ports and vessels.
1
Through the aforementioned legislation, the import and export industry were assisted by
lowering the cost of shipping and port congestion by allowing foreign vessels to dock on any
port within the Philippines with the appropriate requirements and documents.
The early stages of the Philippine Cabotage policy is from the US Jones Act of 1920 when it
was still under colonial control. Republic Act 1937 enacted in 1957 continued the adoption of
this principle.
Two laws can also be attributed to the passing of this law Republic Act No. 1937 or the
Tariff and Customs Code of the Philippines and Republic Act No. 9295 or the Domestic
Shipping Development Act of 2004.
The Philippine Gross Domestic Product (GDP) posted a growth rate of 6.348 on 2014 to 2015.
On 2016, after the implementation of the amended Cabotage Law, the Philippine GDP grew
to a rate of 7.149 in 2016.
2
Nonetheless, further data is needed such as the factors of such
growth, but it is assumed that the Amended Cabotage Law is a part of those factors.
The Philippine total export sales in May 2021, amounting to USD 5.89 billion, increased
at an annual rate of 29.8 percent, from an increase of 74.1 percent in the previous month.
While the total imported goods in May 2021, which amounted to USD 8.65 billion,
increased at an annual rate of 47.7 percent. Obviously, this needs more thorough study,
but the amended Cabotage Law plays a large role in the continuous growth in the
Philippine import and export industry.
1
https://pidswebs.pids.gov.ph/CDN/OUTREACH/Llanto-Navarro-Cabotage.pdf
2
https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG?end=2020&locations=PH&start=1961&view=chart

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NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ARTS CENTER FOR GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT Commonwealth Avenue corner Regalado St. Fairview, Quezon City PROGRAM : SUBJECT : STUDENT : PROFESSOR: Master in Public Administration Environmental and Resource Economic Policy Ramil A. Alegarbes Dr. Dorothy Lagrada Republic Act No. 10668, otherwise known as the amended “Cabotage Law” The problem that the above-mentioned legislation hopes to address is the high logistic costs and strict restrictions in the transport, import or export cargo to and from the Port of Manila leading to the lack of meaningful competition, therefore holding back the modernization of the Philippine Ports and vessels.1 Through the aforementioned legislation, the import and export industry were assisted by lowering the cost of shipping and port congestion by allowing foreign vessels to dock on any port within the Philippines with the appropriate requirements and documents. The early stages of the Philippine Cabotage policy is from the US Jones Act of 1920 when it was still under colonial control. Republic Act 1937 enacted in 1957 continued the adoption of this principle. Two laws can also be attributed to the passing of this law – Republic Act No. 1937 or the Tariff and Customs Code of the Philippines and Republic Act No. 9295 or the Domestic Shipping Development Act of 2004. The Philippine Gross Domestic Product (GDP) posted a growth rate of 6.348 on 2014 to 2015. On 2016, after the implementation of the amended Cabotage Law, the Philippine GDP grew to a rate of 7.149 in 2016.2 Nonetheless, further data is needed such as the factors of such growth, but it is assumed that the Amended Cabotage Law is a part of those factors. The Philippine total export sales in May 2021, amounting to USD 5.89 billion, increased at an annual rate of 29.8 percent, from an increase of 74.1 percent in the previous month. While the total imported goods in May 2021, which amounted to USD 8.65 billion, increased at an annual rate of 47.7 percent. Obviously, this needs more thorough study, but the amended Cabotage Law plays a large role in the continuous growth in the Philippine import and export industry. 1 2 https://pidswebs.pids.gov.ph/CDN/OUTREACH/Llanto-Navarro-Cabotage.pdf https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG?end=2020&locations=PH&start=1961&view=chart Name: Description: ...
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