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Flandrian interglacial or stage is the name given by geologists and archaeologists in the British
Isles to the first, and so far only, stage of the Holocene epoch (the present geological period),
covering the period from around 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last glacial period to the present
day. As such, it is in practice identical in span to the Holocene. The Flandrian began as the relatively
short-lived Younger Dryas climate downturn came to an end. This formed the last gasp of
the Devensian glaciation, the final stage of the Pleistocene epoch. The Flandrian is traditionally seen
as the latest warm interglacial in a series that has been occurring throughout
the Quaternary geological period. The first part of the Flandrian, known as the Younger Atlantic, was
a period of fairly rapid sea level rise,
[1]
known as the Flandrian transgression. It is associated with
the melting of the Fenno-Scandian, Scottish, Laurentide and Cordilleran glaciers. Fjords were
formed during the Flandrian transgression when U-shaped glaciated valleys were inundated.
[2]

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Flandrian interglacial or stage is the name given by geologists and archaeologists in the British Isles to the first, and so far only, stage of the Holocene epoch (the present geological period), covering the period from around 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last glacial period to the present day. As such, it is in practice identical in span to the Holocene. The Flandrian began as the relatively short-lived Younger Dryas climate downturn came to an end. This formed the last gasp of the Devensian glaciation, the final stage of the Pleistocene epoch. The Flandrian is traditionally seen as the latest warm interglacial in a series that has been occurring throughout the Quaternary geological period. The first part of the Flandrian, known as the Younger Atlantic, was a period of fairly rapid sea level rise,[1] known as the Flandrian transgression. It is associated with the melting of the Fenno-Scandian, Scottish, Laurentide and Cordilleran glaciers. Fjords were formed during the Flandrian transgression when U-shaped glaciated valleys were inundated.[2] Name: Description: ...
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