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Putumayo River is one of the tributaries of the Amazon River, west of and parallel to the Japurá
River. The Putumayo River forms part of Colombia's border with Ecuador, as well as most of the
frontier with Peru. Known as the Putumayo in the former three nations, it is called the Içá when it
crosses into Brazil. The Putumayo originates in the Andes Mountains east of the city of Pasto,
Colombia. It empties into the Solimões (upper Amazon) near the municipality of Santo Antônio do
Içá, Brazil. Major tributaries include the Guamués River, San Miguel, Güeppí, Cumpuya, Algodón,
Igara-Paraná, Yaguas, Cotuhé, and Paraná de Jacurapá rivers.
[2][4]
The river flows through
the Solimões-Japurá moist forests ecoregion. This production network mainly relied on the labor of
indigenous Indians, who suffered from widespread human rights abuses. These abuses were first
publicized in 1909 within the British press by the American engineer Walter Hardenburg, who had
been briefly imprisoned by Arana's private police force in 1907 while visiting the region; Hardenburg
later published his book The Putumayo: The Devil's Paradise in 1913.
[6]

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Putumayo River is one of the tributaries of the Amazon River, west of and parallel to the Japurá River. The Putumayo River forms part of Colombia's border with Ecuador, as well as most of the frontier with Peru. Known as the Putumayo in the former three nations, it is called the Içá when it crosses into Brazil. The Putumayo originates in the Andes Mountains east of the city of Pasto, Colombia. It empties into the Solimões (upper Amazon) near the municipality of Santo Antônio do Içá, Brazil. Major tributaries include the Guamués River, San Miguel, Güeppí, Cumpuya, Algodón, Igara-Paraná, Yaguas, Cotuhé, and Paraná de Jacurapá rivers.[2][4] The river flows through the Solimões-Japurá moist forests ecoregion. This production network mainly relied on the labor of indigenous Indians, who suffered from widespread human rights abuses. These abuses were first publicized in 1909 within the British press by the American engineer Walter Hardenburg, who had been briefly imprisoned by Arana's private police force in 1907 while visiting the region; Hardenburg later published his book The Putumayo: The Devil's Paradise in 1913.[6] Name: Description: ...
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