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1.
Information Text
The Main Idea of the text is the evidence of racism’s existence in the history of the
Philippines. In the three studies mentioned in the synthesis report, they give first-hand
accounts of the evidence of racism in the country.
For instance, Rafael stated the beginning of Racism in the Philippines, which
started during the Spanish Colonial period, wherein the colonizers from Europe degrade
the locals due to their complexity and skin color, seeing them as inferior.
Bulloch further supports the idea of the existence of racism in the Philippines,
stating that during the American Colonial Period, the locals further adopted a sense of
colonial mentality, favoring American culture more than the Filipino culture, as evident in
Siquijor’s imagining of the “Amerika”. Lastly, Okada further supported the idea of Racism
against Filipinos not just in the country, but abroad, as he stated evidence in the form of
the 1930 Watsonville Riots.
Overall, Racism is evident in the Philippines, as supported by the three articles. It
will be up to the Filipinos to shone this centuries old form of bigotry. Stopping racism will
start from ourselves, in learning the past, to make the future a better place, one without
racism.
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2.
Synthesis Report
“Racism in the Philippines: Is it Evident?”
With the recent events happening in the United States, the deaths of multiple
African- Americans with the likes of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and more, public
outcry for justice against racism has become eminent throughout the country. Athletes,
celebrities, politicians, and ordinary citizens in the United States band together in order to
fight racism, and it worked; It made every citizen see that there is hope for a better country,
with no place for racism. But, in the Philippines, racism is present too. Whether we accept
it or not. In its rich and vast history, the country had faced rulings from colonizers, most
prominently the Spaniards and the Americans.
According to Rafael (2015), it began during the Spanish colonial period. The term
“Filipino” became a derogatory word for the locals and to distinguish them from the ones
born and raised in the Spanish Peninsula. He mentioned that the Filipino was regarded as
an inferior race, as its dark skin and complexity were seen poorly and degraded by its
colonizers who valued the European standard of fair and white complexity above others.
As the Spanish Era came to an end, the term went from a word of degradation to a
nationalist watchword for the youthful revolutionaries who used it to mean all those who
suffered the common fate of Spanish oppression.
Moreover, Bulloch (2013), asserted that the American colonization of the
Philippines at the turn of the 19
th
Century saw a drastic drive in the country’s racism as the
Filipinos adopted a colonial mentality, looking down on one’s complexity and culture, and
viewing it as inferior wherein the Filipinos favor the American culture. In one such place
in the Central Visayan region, Siquijor, this mentality is evident until today wherein the
locals think of the United States, locally termed as Amerika”, as an idealized entity. The
locals of Siquijor adopted local imaginings of Amerikano lifestyles as reference points for
ideals of affluence and beauty. In Siquijor, there is an inward-looking discontent which is
well evident in the hierarchy of culture in the area, giving value to a culture of a place way
beyond their homeland, and a strong presumption that the Philippines failed to reach the
levels of affluence and beauty similar to that of the United States which is due to moral
deficiencies of the Filipino Self in Siquijor.
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Lastly, according to Okada, Racism against Filipinos were present not just in the
mainland, but as well as in the United States, one of its colonizers, like one of the known
presences of Anti-Filipino racism was in the Watsonville Riot of 1930, which is caused by
socioeconomic tensions, and hatred against the growing number of Filipino working in the
farms, causing numerous mob violence in the 23 days of the riots.
In its rich history, the Philippines has its share of racism, coming from its
colonizers from the West, and from the very locals who call the archipelago their home. Its
centuries of not just colonization but the colonial mentality of the locals have caused a
sense of racism to be evident until today. One must adopt a sense of equality in this day of
age, that no race is neither superior nor inferior. Whether we accept it or not, racism, unless
we take a course of action in stopping it, will continue.
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References
Bulloch, H. (2013). Concerning Constructions of Self and Other: Auto-racism and
Imagining Amerika in the Christian Philippines. Anthropological Forum, 23, 221 - 241.
Okada, T. (2012). Underside of Independence Politics Filipino Reactions to Anti-Filipino
Riots in the United States. Philippine Studies: Historical & Ethnographic Viewpoints,
60(3), 307-335. Retrieved August 15, 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/42634724
Rafael, V. (2015, June 25). Racism in the Philippines: Does it matter? Retrieved August
15, 2020, from https://rappler.com/voices/thought-leaders/racism-philippines

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1. Information Text The Main Idea of the text is the evidence of racism’s existence in the history of the Philippines. In the three studies mentioned in the synthesis report, they give first-hand accounts of the evidence of racism in the country. For instance, Rafael stated the beginning of Racism in the Philippines, which started during the Spanish Colonial period, wherein the colonizers from Europe degrade the locals due to their complexity and skin color, seeing them as inferior. Bulloch further supports the idea of the existence of racism in the Philippines, stating that during the American Colonial Period, the locals further adopted a sense of colonial mentality, favoring American culture more than the Filipino culture, as evident in Siquijor’s imagining of the “Amerika”. Lastly, Okada further supported the idea of Racism against Filipinos not just in the country, but abroad, as he stated evidence in the form of the 1930 Watsonville Riots. Overall, Racism is evident in the Philippines, as supported by the three articles. It will be up to the Filipinos to shone this centuries old form of bigotry. Stopping racism will start from ourselves, in learning the past, to make the future a better place, one without racism. 2. Synthesis Report “Racism in the Philippines: Is it Evident?” With the recent events happening in the United States, the deaths of multiple African- Americans with the likes of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and more, public outcry for justice against racism has become eminent throughout the country. Athletes, celebrities, politicians, and ordinary citizens in the United States band together in order to fight racism, and it worked; It made every citizen see that there is hope for a better country, with no place for racism. But, in the Philippines, racism is present too. Whether we accept it or not. In its rich and vast history, the country had faced rulings from colonizers, most prominently the Spaniards and the Americans. According to Rafael (2015), it began during the Spanish colonial period. The term “Filipino” became a derogatory word for the locals and to distinguish them from the ones born and raised in the Spanish Peninsula. He mentioned that the Filipino was regarded as an inferior race, as its dark skin and complexity were seen poorly and degraded by its colonizers who valued the European standard of fair and white complexity above others. As the Spanish Era came to an end, the term went from a word of degradation to a nationalist watchword for the youthful revolutionaries who used it to mean all those who suffered the common fate of Spanish oppression. Moreover, Bulloch (2013), asserted that the American colonization of the Philippines at the turn of the 19th Century saw a drastic drive in the country’s racism as the Filipinos adopted a colonial mentality, looking down on one’s complexity and culture, and viewing it as inferior wherein the Filipinos favor the American culture. In one such place in the Central Visayan region, Siquijor, this mentality is evident until today wherein the locals think of the United States, locally termed as “Amerika”, as an idealized entity. The locals of Siquijor adopted local imaginings of Amerikano lifestyles as reference points for ideals of affluence and beauty. In Siquijor, there is an inward-looking discontent which is well evident in the hierarchy of culture in the area, giving value to a culture of a place way beyond their homeland, and a strong presumption that the Philippines failed to reach the levels of affluence and beauty similar to that of the United States which is due to moral deficiencies of the Filipino Self in Siquijor. Lastly, according to Okada, Racism against Filipinos were present not just in the mainland, but as well as in the United States, one of its colonizers, like one of the known presences of Anti-Filipino racism was in the Watsonville Riot of 1930, which is caused by socioeconomic tensions, and hatred against the growing number of Filipino working in the farms, causing numerous mob violence in the 23 days of the riots. In its rich history, the Philippines has its share of racism, coming from its colonizers from the West, and from the very locals who call the archipelago their home. Its centuries of not just colonization but the colonial mentality of the locals have caused a sense of racism to be evident until today. One must adopt a sense of equality in this day of age, that no race is neither superior nor inferior. Whether we accept it or not, racism, unless we take a course of action in stopping it, will continue. References Bulloch, H. (2013). Concerning Constructions of Self and Other: Auto-racism and Imagining Amerika in the Christian Philippines. Anthropological Forum, 23, 221 - 241. Okada, T. (2012). Underside of Independence Politics Filipino Reactions to Anti-Filipino Riots in the United States. Philippine Studies: Historical & Ethnographic Viewpoints, 60(3), 307-335. Retrieved August 15, 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/42634724 Rafael, V. (2015, June 25). Racism in the Philippines: Does it matter? Retrieved August 15, 2020, from https://rappler.com/voices/thought-leaders/racism-philippines Name: Description: ...
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