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School of Nursing
Essay Writing
Role of Nurses to address Community Health Issues
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Introduction
Diabetes mellitus type II has rapidly become a major cause of public health burden internationally
(Viner, White, & Christie, 2017). Thus, it is significant to have a predominant management
intervention for people living with diabetes. Considering that the role of healthcare professional
specifically nurses serve an expert role in various communities either in disadvantaged areas to inform
or instruct, assist the managerial goal in providing possible intervention to provide an evidence-based
and strength-based approach for patients and minimizing the risk.
In Australia, the aboriginal community have the highest incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Many
of the individuals who lived in indigenous disadvantaged areas were also suffered from high rates of
other unnecessary complications (Hill, Ward, Grace, & Gleadle, 2017). Although, many of the
complications associated with diabetes can be easily prohibited by providing a better quality of
primary care management. Nonetheless, in certain culturally inappropriate remote setting areas, it is
difficult to maintain a high quality of diabetes care. In this essay, the strength-based nursing approach
by maintaining the NMC code of confidentiality and ethical consideration elaborated the components
required to prevent and manage the illness such as diabetes (Snelling, 2016). Furthermore, the essay
will explain the specific roles of nurses in aboriginal communities for managing diabetic conditions.
Most of the approaches were generally focused on the restrengthened approach. Nurses working in
disadvantaged communities have designed appropriate approaches within cultural support. The main
focus will be on approaches that enable evaluation outcomes comprises of cultural tailoring strategies
primarily focused on educating the general population of aboriginal areas. Hence, allied healthcare
professionals such as nurses have to design approachethatch affect individuals and communities
because a huge number of the population resides in tore’s areas with less access to the healthcare
facilities.
Discussion
Considering the Australian Aboriginal population reported with an average of 10 years younger than
the age of normal adults suffered from type II diabetes. Most of the patients usually reported poor
glycemic control and does not have sufficient practice in controlling the symptoms of diabetes
compared to non-aboriginal individuals having diabetes. Therefore, in remote settings, there is high
complications associated with diabetes are reported which was left untreated due to insufficient
knowledge of and high turnover rates of nurses in that (Keel, et al., 2017). Although, community-
based healthcare nurses can play a significant role in improving the quality of care for diabetic
patients employing in area communication culturally suitable self-management support based on
patient-centred and introducing the strength-based approach in patients. In addition to this, the
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aboriginal people developed the understanding of strength-based intervention by obtaining
appropriate training from community nurses for managing their diabetes (Chatterjee, et al., 2018).
Hence, the best care for diabetes in a population of aboriginal areas is delivered by community
registered nurses in collaboration with the patient and their family members evidence-based practice
is the preferred model in which healthcare professionals along with an entire team of nurses and the
multidisciplinary team carry out the general assessment and monitoring of health status (Portney,
2020). The collaborative approach in such areas with less available resources helped to mutually
accomplish the acceptable health goals. Though, community nurses have worked with innovative
approaches to improve the quality of care in aboriginal areas while managing diabetic conditions.
According to the recent literature providing care for managing the diabetic condition in the aboriginal
population focuses on the significance of primary care which integrated the care that provides a
culturally safe environment for managing chronic illness (Miyamoto, Hermosura, & Acido, 2019).
While there is a need to increase the assessment of aboriginal people who have to enhance the primary
care setting in remote areas. The following professional for diabetic patients was not adequate, there is
a huge gap present between the knowledge and practice of nurses working in the disadvantaged
community. The humiliation perception and discrimination are experienced by aboriginal people in
the health services framework and power discrepancies in between aboriginal patients and health
services which continues to bound the cultural safety.
The normative conceptual model of providing care to diabetic patients is primarily described by the
health professionals through educating all diabetic patients about the strengths required in managing
their health conditions (Montgomery, 2019). Although, the modification which has required to
improve the cultural appropriateness of all innovative strategies has developed in identifying the
appropriate practice of promoting healthcare for the aboriginal population. The community nurses
acted as the key agent that provides education and methods of helping aboriginal residents to develop
relevant understandings about diabetes. For instance, previous literature has been evident that people
having diabetes n remote areas does not about continuous monitoring of their blood glucose level
either they have lack education about preventing themselves from developing the complications
associated with diabetes (Burrow & Ride, 2016). Therefore, the healthcare services with various
levels of attributes recognized the patterns that consistent approach required to improve the glycaemic
index in aboriginal patients which have followed the multifactorial approach.
In remote disadvantaged communities, there is already a lack of resources available for managing
health conditions in the population. Therefore, considering all the needs community nurses plays an
important role in providing care for prevention and control diabetic cases. Emerging literature
suggested that nurses have different roles to play like as an educator, caregivers andmotivatorsr (Lai,
Taylor, Haigh, & Thompson, 2018). These all roles are elaborated in a way that; nursing care greatly
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influenced and promote education in the community by providing education to patients so that they
can manage their diseases by themselves. As diabetes is a chronic condition its complication can
increase the hospital admission for treatment of associated illness. In the past various studies, it has
shown that nurses modify the management of diabetic patients via significant education. In studies, a
positive impact on the community has noticed when community nurses were involved in spreading
the awareness and education to improve the glycaemic control for the diabetic patient (Murphy, et al.,
2017) . To specify, the recent descriptive data showed the importance of community nurses role in
educating patients who have further claimed that in enhancing the quality of care nurses acted as a
teacher and they have elaborated the patients about their changing situation, informing patients about
their health conditions, possible complications and regular monitoring. It has been highlighted and
supported the importance of education for diabetic patient. According to the study, the HbA1c test is
one of the importanmeasurementsnt to monitor the average blood glucose level for three months
(Chehregosha, Khamseh, Malek, Hosseinpanah, & Ismail-Beigi, 2019). This test will help the patient
to a regular monitor and maintain their blood glucose level. The awareness about monitoring given
byeducationh has probeen moted by nurses for quality of health maintenance.
The nurses also play a role of advanced caregivers in which they prefer to give care to all their
patients equally. Health carprofessionalsal specifically nurses encourage diabeticpatientst towards
more physical activities which maintain their blood glucolevelsvel. The implementation of daily
exercise enables to bring the change in overall personality (Nikitara, Constantinou, Andreou, &
Diomidous, 2019). Literature Rosenstock suggested that routine involvement in physical activities can
be more effective in maintaining a good relationship with other patients and staff working in the
healthcare institution (Rogers, et al., 2019). Social support plays a key role in diabetes patients and is
important to enable them to cope effectively with the disease. Nurses educate all patients living in the
aboriginal areas about health and management practice which enable them to practice and
manageffectiveei their health condition. In various hospital sector sessions on preventive strategies are
often arranged, nurses invited ppatients liketo come and attend a certain session and promote health
literacy specifically in remote areas. The prime factor for managing the type II diabetes condition
based on the collaborative approach comprises adherence to healthy eating and more physical
workout along with adequate pharmacological medications. Thus, the dance-based practice in the
healthcare sector facilitates the process of managing type II diabetes and acted as health a promotion
component. To motivate other nurses, the NHS designed certain training pprogramhealthcarethcare
profess to modify their practice based on evidence and improve the quality of care (Joseph-Williams,
et al., 2017). For promothnationon and betterment of health, it is important to identify the possible
barriers and elieliminatethwith the proper approach towards managing illness. The healthcare
professional has to track the patient for proper follow-up and monitoring of the condition. Therefore,
for that NHS health check has developed a successful measure to evaluate healthy lifestyle.
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5
Another specific role of community nurses that was based on literature was as a collaborator
(Mertens, De Gendt, Deveugele, Van Hecke, & Pype, 2019). Nurses believed in teamwork and
combined efforts to educate and train community nurses for managing the illness. Thus, nurses
preferred to conduct all the educational sessions in which all the healthcare sectors spend time with all
other patients to educate and support them against the diabetic fight. Previous studies also revealed
that nurses working in a community also acted ae motivators (Papastavrou, Dimitriadou, Tsangari, &
Andreou, 2016). In diabetic patients nurses also give psychosocial support. Most of the patientsst has
unable to deal with their illness by themselves received complete motivation via me off ns
communication to engage in self-care Even though, nurses also support psychosocial care along with
taking care of physical care. Nurses have this perception that it is significant to help diabetic patients
living in remote areas so that they can feel secure and hopeful against fighting with their chronic
illness (Bjerregaard, Haslam, Mewse, & Morton, 2017).
The strength-based approaches focused on the patient’s belongings and have the potential to deal with
all ongoing issues that seem obstinate. In chronic conditions like diabetes management in the
community have remote access the strength and support of patients come from social surroundings
such as family, friends and faithful community, other options are obtaining support from the
community including healthcare and nursing support (Kamath, 2017). Moreover, is support based on
knowledge about providing the facility in the health system and health literacy or knowing about the
individual's skills and attributes like living an independent life. Thus, the strong base approach works
on the theory that knowing about patients strength help in developing the personalized management
plan. This approach works best with community nurses.
Whereas, patients lived in the disadvantaged community felt difficult to identify and articulate their
strengths when asking them directly. Therefore, at times nurse help patients to identify their strengths
which may be relevant for improving their chronic diabetes prevention and management. It is crucial
to relate and ask the question which will connect with them for example, when the asked patient to
think about any time when they drew on strengths within themselves for observing any positive
change in their health, in general answers only focused on shot pills and doctors. Whereas, when
asked patient to share their experience when they felt good in with this illness may be because of their
community and resources available in their surroundings. Usually the ideas works and patient came
up with excellent stories about using their strengths (Rariden, 2019). The overall healthcare team
developed which worked on identification of the characteristics relevant to the strength-based
approach in health care by motivating the potential resources for assessment either formally or
informally. Develops a holistic impression of the patient for both the person and health care provider
thus, this procedure will help in developing an energized personal platform n by using patients
strength for achieving possible goals. Thus, this strength-based approach related to greater
engagement in healthcare.
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6
Conclusion
In aboriginal areas, patients want extra care and management plan for dealing with chronic diseases
like diabetes. Nurses working in the disadvantaged community worked on a collaborative team
approach for recognizing the strength of patients and establish a care plan which will give more
positive outcomes. Nurses usually used a holistic approach to maintaining the well-being of patients.
However, in remote communities as educators, caregivers and a motivator. Therefore, nurses arranged
different session to promote awareness and educate the population about the management of diabetes
and promote patient-centred care. Overall patients help put patients empower themselves by
developing an understanding about their strengths which can be used by patients of diabetes for
changing their behaviour towards managing chronic illness. Thus, the team-based learning approach
also helps health professional to advance holistic understanding about the patients by seeing the
standards and significance of patients. This approach empowered patients by developing an
understanding of their strength which they can use to modify their behaviours towards managing
chronic illness.
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7
References
Bjerregaard, K., Haslam, S., Mewse, A., & Morton, T. (2017). The shared experience of an of
carekersudy of care-worker motivations and identifications at work. Ageing & Society, 37(1),
113-138.
Burrow, S., & Ride, K. (2016). Review of diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
people.
Chatterjee, S., Davies, M., Heller, S., Speight, J., Snoek, F., & Khunti, K. (2018). Diabetes structured
self-management education programmes: a narrative review and current innovations. The
Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 6(2), 130-142.
Chehregosha, H., Khamseh, M., Malek, M., Hosseinpanah, F., & Ismail-Beigi, F. (2019). A view
beyond HbA1c: role of continuous glucose monitoring. Diabetes Therapy, 10(3), 853-863.
Hill, K., Ward, P., Grace, B., & Gleadle, J. (2017). Social disparities in the prevalence of diabetes in
Australia and the development of end-stage renal disease due to diabetes for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islanders in Australia and Maori and Pacific Islanders in New Zealand. BMC
public health, 17(1), 802.
Joseph-Williams, N., Lloyd, A., Edwards, A., Stobbart, L., Tomson, D., Macphail, S., . . . Thomson,
R. (2017). Implementing shared decision making in the NHS: lessons from the MAGIC
programme. BMJ, 357, j1744.
Kamath, S. (2017). Enhancement of resilience and quality of life using strength-based counselling and
the mediating role of parental bonding in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
Keel, S., Foreman, J., Xie, J., Van Wijngaarden, P., Taylor, H., & Dirani, M. (2017). The prevalence
of self-reported diabetes in the Australian national eye health survey. PLoS One, 12(1).
Lai, G., Taylor, E., Haigh, M., & Thompson, S. (2018). Factors affecting the retention of indigenous
Australians in the health workforce: a systematic review. International journal of
environmental research and public health, 15(5), 914.
Mertens, F., De Gendt, A., Deveugele, M., Van Hecke, A., & Pype, P. (2019). Interprofessional
collaboration within fluid teams: Community nurses' experiences with palliative home care.
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(19-20), 3680-3690.
Miyamoto, R., Hermosura, A., & Acido, D. (2019). A Culture-Based Family-Centered Health
Navigation Intervention for Chronic Disease Management in Native Hawaiians. Hawai'i
Journal of Medicine & Public Health, 78(6 Suppl 1), 78.
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Montgomery, K. (2019). Development of a Tele-Healthcare Clinical Practice Guideline for Diabetic
Patients.
Murphy, M., Byrne, M., Galvin, R., Boland, F., Fahey, T., & Smith, S. (2017). Improving risk factor
management for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of
healthcare interventions in primary care and community settings. BMJ Open, 7(8), e015135.
Nikitara, M., Constantinou, C., Andreou, E., & Diomidous, M. (2019). The Role of Nurses and the
Facilitators and Barriers in Diabetes Care: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Literature Review.
Behavioral Sciences, 9(6), 61.
Papastavrou, E., Dimitriadou, M., Tsangari, H., & Andreou, C. (2016). Nursing students’ satisfaction
of the clinical learning environment: a research study. BMC nursing, 15(1), 44.
Portney, L. (2020). Foundations of Clinical Research: Applications to Evidence-Based Practice. FA
Davis.
Rariden, C. (2019). Diabetes Distress: Assessment and Management of the Emotional Aspect of
Diabetes Mellitus. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 15(9), 653-656.
Snelling, P. (2016). The metaethics of nursing codes of ethics and conduct. Nursing Philosophy,
17(4), 229-249.
Viner, R., White, B., & Christie, D. (2017). Type 2 diabetes in adolescents: a severe phenotype posing
major clinical challenges and public health burden. The Lancet, 389(10085), 2252-2260.

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School of Nursing Essay Writing Role of Nurses to address Community Health Issues 1 Introduction Diabetes mellitus type II has rapidly become a major cause of public health burden internationally (Viner, White, & Christie, 2017). Thus, it is significant to have a predominant management intervention for people living with diabetes. Considering that the role of healthcare professional specifically nurses serve an expert role in various communities either in disadvantaged areas to inform or instruct, assist the managerial goal in providing possible intervention to provide an evidence-based and strength-based approach for patients and minimizing the risk. In Australia, the aboriginal community have the highest incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Many of the individuals who lived in indigenous disadvantaged areas were also suffered from high rates of other unnecessary complications (Hill, Ward, Grace, & Gleadle, 2017). Although, many of the complications associated with diabetes can be easily prohibited by providing a better quality of primary care management. Nonetheless, in certain culturally inappropriate remote setting areas, it is difficult to maintain a high quality of diabetes care. In this essay, the strength-based nursing approach by maintaining the NMC code of confidentiality and ethical consideration elaborated the components required to prevent and manage the illness such as diabetes (Snelling, 2016). Furthermore, the essay will explain the specific roles of nurses in aboriginal communities for managing diabetic conditions. Most of the approaches were generally focused on the restrengthened approach. Nurses working in disadvantaged communities have designed appropriate approaches within cultural support. The main focus will be on approaches that enable evaluation outcomes comprises of cultural tailoring strategies primarily focused on educating the general population of aboriginal areas. Hence, allied healthcare professionals such as nurses have to design approachethatch affect individuals and communities because a huge number of the population resides in tore’s areas with less access to the healthcare facilities. Discussion Considering the Australian Aboriginal population reported with an average of 10 years younger than the age of normal adults suffered from type II diabetes. Most of the patients usually reported poor glycemic control and does not have sufficient practice in controlling the symptoms of diabetes compared to non-aboriginal individuals having diabetes. Therefore, in remote settings, there is high complications associated with diabetes are reported which was left untreated due to insufficient knowledge of and high turnover rates of nurses in that (Keel, et al., 2017). Although, communitybased healthcare nurses can play a significant role in improving the quality of care for diabetic patients employing in area communication culturally suitable self-management support based on patient-centred and introducing the strength-based approach in patients. In addition to this, the 2 aboriginal people developed the understanding of strength-based intervention by obtaining appropriate training from community nurses for managing their diabetes (Chatterjee, et al., 2018). Hence, the best care for diabetes in a population of aboriginal areas is delivered by community registered nurses in collaboration with the patient and their family members evidence-based practice is the preferred model in which healthcare professionals along with an entire team of nurses and the multidisciplinary team carry out the general assessment and monitoring of health status (Portney, 2020). The collaborative approach in such areas with less available resources helped to mutually accomplish the acceptable health goals. Though, community nurses have worked with innovative approaches to improve the quality of care in aboriginal areas while managing diabetic conditions. According to the recent literature providing care for managing the diabetic condition in the aboriginal population focuses on the significance of primary care which integrated the care that provides a culturally safe environment for managing chronic illness (Miyamoto, Hermosura, & Acido, 2019). While there is a need to increase the assessment of aboriginal people who have to enhance the primary care setting in remote areas. The following professional for diabetic patients was not adequate, there is a huge gap present between the knowledge and practice of nurses working in the disadvantaged community. The humiliation perception and discrimination are experienced by aboriginal people in the health services framework and power discrepancies in between aboriginal patients and health services which continues to bound the cultural safety. The normative conceptual model of providing care to diabetic patients is primarily described by the health professionals through educating all diabetic patients about the strengths required in managing their health conditions (Montgomery, 2019). Although, the modification which has required to improve the cultural appropriateness of all innovative strategies has developed in identifying the appropriate practice of promoting healthcare for the aboriginal population. The community nurses acted as the key agent that provides education and methods of helping aboriginal residents to develop relevant understandings about diabetes. For instance, previous literature has been evident that people having diabetes n remote areas does not about continuous monitoring of their blood glucose level either they have lack education about preventing themselves from developing the complications associated with diabetes (Burrow & Ride, 2016). Therefore, the healthcare services with various levels of attributes recognized the patterns that consistent approach required to improve the glycaemic index in aboriginal patients which have followed the multifactorial approach. In remote disadvantaged communities, there is already a lack of resources available for managing health conditions in the population. Therefore, considering all the needs community nurses plays an important role in providing care for prevention and control diabetic cases. Emerging literature suggested that nurses have different roles to play like as an educator, caregivers andmotivatorsr (Lai, Taylor, Haigh, & Thompson, 2018). These all roles are elaborated in a way that; nursing care greatly 3 influenced and promote education in the community by providing education to patients so that they can manage their diseases by themselves. As diabetes is a chronic condition its complication can increase the hospital admission for treatment of associated illness. In the past various studies, it has shown that nurses modify the management of diabetic patients via significant education. In studies, a positive impact on the community has noticed when community nurses were involved in spreading the awareness and education to improve the glycaemic control for the diabetic patient (Murphy, et al., 2017) . To specify, the recent descriptive data showed the importance of community nurses role in educating patients who have further claimed that in enhancing the quality of care nurses acted as a teacher and they have elaborated the patients about their changing situation, informing patients about their health conditions, possible complications and regular monitoring. It has been highlighted and supported the importance of education for diabetic patient. According to the study, the HbA1c test is one of the importanmeasurementsnt to monitor the average blood glucose level for three months (Chehregosha, Khamseh, Malek, Hosseinpanah, & Ismail-Beigi, 2019). This test will help the patient to a regular monitor and maintain their blood glucose level. The awareness about monitoring given byeducationh has probeen moted by nurses for quality of health maintenance. The nurses also play a role of advanced caregivers in which they prefer to give care to all their patients equally. Health carprofessionalsal specifically nurses encourage diabeticpatientst towards more physical activities which maintain their blood glucolevelsvel. The implementation of daily exercise enables to bring the change in overall personality (Nikitara, Constantinou, Andreou, & Diomidous, 2019). Literature Rosenstock suggested that routine involvement in physical activities can be more effective in maintaining a good relationship with other patients and staff working in the healthcare institution (Rogers, et al., 2019). Social support plays a key role in diabetes patients and is important to enable them to cope effectively with the disease. Nurses educate all patients living in the aboriginal areas about health and management practice which enable them to practice and manageffectiveei their health condition. In various hospital sector sessions on preventive strategies are often arranged, nurses invited ppatients liketo come and attend a certain session and promote health literacy specifically in remote areas. The prime factor for managing the type II diabetes condition based on the collaborative approach comprises adherence to healthy eating and more physical workout along with adequate pharmacological medications. Thus, the dance-based practice in the healthcare sector facilitates the process of managing type II diabetes and acted as health a promotion component. To motivate other nurses, the NHS designed certain training pprogramhealthcarethcare profess to modify their practice based on evidence and improve the quality of care (Joseph-Williams, et al., 2017). For promothnationon and betterment of health, it is important to identify the possible barriers and elieliminatethwith the proper approach towards managing illness. The healthcare professional has to track the patient for proper follow-up and monitoring of the condition. Therefore, for that NHS health check has developed a successful measure to evaluate healthy lifestyle. 4 Another specific role of community nurses that was based on literature was as a collaborator (Mertens, De Gendt, Deveugele, Van Hecke, & Pype, 2019). Nurses believed in teamwork and combined efforts to educate and train community nurses for managing the illness. Thus, nurses preferred to conduct all the educational sessions in which all the healthcare sectors spend time with all other patients to educate and support them against the diabetic fight. Previous studies also revealed that nurses working in a community also acted ae motivators (Papastavrou, Dimitriadou, Tsangari, & Andreou, 2016). In diabetic patients nurses also give psychosocial support. Most of the patientsst has unable to deal with their illness by themselves received complete motivation via me off ns communication to engage in self-care Even though, nurses also support psychosocial care along with taking care of physical care. Nurses have this perception that it is significant to help diabetic patients living in remote areas so that they can feel secure and hopeful against fighting with their chronic illness (Bjerregaard, Haslam, Mewse, & Morton, 2017). The strength-based approaches focused on the patient’s belongings and have the potential to deal with all ongoing issues that seem obstinate. In chronic conditions like diabetes management in the community have remote access the strength and support of patients come from social surroundings such as family, friends and faithful community, other options are obtaining support from the community including healthcare and nursing support (Kamath, 2017). Moreover, is support based on knowledge about providing the facility in the health system and health literacy or knowing about the individual's skills and attributes like living an independent life. Thus, the strong base approach works on the theory that knowing about patients strength help in developing the personalized management plan. This approach works best with community nurses. Whereas, patients lived in the disadvantaged community felt difficult to identify and articulate their strengths when asking them directly. Therefore, at times nurse help patients to identify their strengths which may be relevant for improving their chronic diabetes prevention and management. It is crucial to relate and ask the question which will connect with them for example, when the asked patient to think about any time when they drew on strengths within themselves for observing any positive change in their health, in general answers only focused on shot pills and doctors. Whereas, when asked patient to share their experience when they felt good in with this illness may be because of their community and resources available in their surroundings. Usually the ideas works and patient came up with excellent stories about using their strengths (Rariden, 2019). The overall healthcare team developed which worked on identification of the characteristics relevant to the strength-based approach in health care by motivating the potential resources for assessment either formally or informally. Develops a holistic impression of the patient for both the person and health care provider thus, this procedure will help in developing an energized personal platform n by using patients strength for achieving possible goals. Thus, this strength-based approach related to greater engagement in healthcare. 5 Conclusion In aboriginal areas, patients want extra care and management plan for dealing with chronic diseases like diabetes. Nurses working in the disadvantaged community worked on a collaborative team approach for recognizing the strength of patients and establish a care plan which will give more positive outcomes. Nurses usually used a holistic approach to maintaining the well-being of patients. However, in remote communities as educators, caregivers and a motivator. Therefore, nurses arranged different session to promote awareness and educate the population about the management of diabetes and promote patient-centred care. Overall patients help put patients empower themselves by developing an understanding about their strengths which can be used by patients of diabetes for changing their behaviour towards managing chronic illness. Thus, the team-based learning approach also helps health professional to advance holistic understanding about the patients by seeing the standards and significance of patients. This approach empowered patients by developing an understanding of their strength which they can use to modify their behaviours towards managing chronic illness. 6 References Bjerregaard, K., Haslam, S., Mewse, A., & Morton, T. (2017). The shared experience of an of carekersudy of care-worker motivations and identifications at work. Ageing & Society, 37(1), 113-138. Burrow, S., & Ride, K. (2016). Review of diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Chatterjee, S., Davies, M., Heller, S., Speight, J., Snoek, F., & Khunti, K. (2018). Diabetes structured self-management education programmes: a narrative review and current innovations. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 6(2), 130-142. Chehregosha, H., Khamseh, M., Malek, M., Hosseinpanah, F., & Ismail-Beigi, F. (2019). A view beyond HbA1c: role of continuous glucose monitoring. Diabetes Therapy, 10(3), 853-863. Hill, K., Ward, P., Grace, B., & Gleadle, J. (2017). Social disparities in the prevalence of diabetes in Australia and the development of end-stage renal disease due to diabetes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Australia and Maori and Pacific Islanders in New Zealand. BMC public health, 17(1), 802. Joseph-Williams, N., Lloyd, A., Edwards, A., Stobbart, L., Tomson, D., Macphail, S., . . . Thomson, R. (2017). Implementing shared decision making in the NHS: lessons from the MAGIC programme. BMJ, 357, j1744. Kamath, S. (2017). Enhancement of resilience and quality of life using strength-based counselling and the mediating role of parental bonding in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Keel, S., Foreman, J., Xie, J., Van Wijngaarden, P., Taylor, H., & Dirani, M. (2017). The prevalence of self-reported diabetes in the Australian national eye health survey. PLoS One, 12(1). Lai, G., Taylor, E., Haigh, M., & Thompson, S. (2018). Factors affecting the retention of indigenous Australians in the health workforce: a systematic review. International journal of environmental research and public health, 15(5), 914. Mertens, F., De Gendt, A., Deveugele, M., Van Hecke, A., & Pype, P. (2019). Interprofessional collaboration within fluid teams: Community nurses' experiences with palliative home care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(19-20), 3680-3690. Miyamoto, R., Hermosura, A., & Acido, D. (2019). A Culture-Based Family-Centered Health Navigation Intervention for Chronic Disease Management in Native Hawaiians. Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health, 78(6 Suppl 1), 78. 7 Montgomery, K. (2019). Development of a Tele-Healthcare Clinical Practice Guideline for Diabetic Patients. Murphy, M., Byrne, M., Galvin, R., Boland, F., Fahey, T., & Smith, S. (2017). Improving risk factor management for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of healthcare interventions in primary care and community settings. BMJ Open, 7(8), e015135. Nikitara, M., Constantinou, C., Andreou, E., & Diomidous, M. (2019). The Role of Nurses and the Facilitators and Barriers in Diabetes Care: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Literature Review. Behavioral Sciences, 9(6), 61. Papastavrou, E., Dimitriadou, M., Tsangari, H., & Andreou, C. (2016). Nursing students’ satisfaction of the clinical learning environment: a research study. BMC nursing, 15(1), 44. Portney, L. (2020). Foundations of Clinical Research: Applications to Evidence-Based Practice. FA Davis. Rariden, C. (2019). Diabetes Distress: Assessment and Management of the Emotional Aspect of Diabetes Mellitus. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 15(9), 653-656. Snelling, P. (2016). The metaethics of nursing codes of ethics and conduct. Nursing Philosophy, 17(4), 229-249. Viner, R., White, B., & Christie, D. (2017). Type 2 diabetes in adolescents: a severe phenotype posing major clinical challenges and public health burden. The Lancet, 389(10085), 2252-2260. 8 Name: Description: ...
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