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Week 4 Assignment Ben Merritt
Sustainable Living Guide Contributions, Part Four of Four:
Sustaining our Atmosphere and Climate
Your Term: [ground-source heat pump]
When temperatures are freezing or extremely hot, it is essential to have a place with
conditioned air where humans can be comfortable, safe, and healthy. With the increasing
population, energy consumption has increased. Traditional heating and cooling methods require
the use of fossil fuels and pollutants that damage the ecosystem. Ground-source heat pump
systems (GSHP) is a renewable heat energy source in use by multiple business facilities and
personal homes for heating and cooling exchange. The earth has a stable temperature over 6 ft
underground that can be cooler or warmer than the temperature above ground level (Bensel &
Carbone, 2020). The sun’s thermal energy is stored in the earth's soil layers. GSHP’s utilize this
stored energy and temperature difference with unique underground multiple piping systems that
can go horizontal and vertical. Water or an environmentally safe liquid with heat transfer
properties is pushed through these pipes. The water takes heat in the pipes from the ground
around the pipes, or the ground takes heat from the water in the pipes depending on the
temperature inside the building. It is then transferred to the air inside the building to heat or cool
(Xuli, Jing, Feng, Liang, & Lei, 2020). Some engineers have made units that integrate solar
collection, power generation, water heating, and tubing designs into the GSHP, which has
increased the system's efficiency and maintained energy costs (Coskun, 2020). GSHP units are
even used for safe driving conditions to protect from icy conditions by heating highways during
cold winter months (Zhao, Zhang, Chen, Su, Li, & Fu, 2020). Another significant usage of
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GSHP is in regulating temperatures in greenhouses used to grow food (Harjunowibowo, Omer,
& Riffat, 2021).
The best use of GSHP is keeping us safe from harmful climate temperature changes and
not harming the environment around us. GSHP is an excellent solution to keep us warm or cool
without contaminating the environment and affecting the ecosystem around us (Zou, Pei, Wang,
& Hao, 2021). As society moves toward renewable energy, GSHP is being accepted as a source
that can be used with other renewable sources to reduce the need for nonrenewable resources.
The energy used is small compared to the massive amount of output. Although GSHP has not
been researched to its full potential, it is part of our present and future (Wang, Li, Xia, Yang,
Hou, & Zhang, 2019). The reduction of carbon and other harmful gases from the use of fossil
fuels will allow cleaner air and slow global warming. The heat from the sun inside the earth will
provide a safe environment for all while still giving us energy (Kose & Petlenkov, 2016). The
economy is growing at a tremendous rate, and the need for power for everyone is high. The
ground in some areas receives more solar energy, and therefore the temperature difference from
the ground is closer to the air above. GSHP systems can be designed to work in areas where
cooling is needed more than heating (Widiatmojo, et, al. 2021). GSHP is in its infancy, and more
research is required to utilize its full potential.
We can support renewable energy policies looking for zero-emission renewable energy
sources like GSHP. Policies that reduce the cost for low income to install energy-saving systems.
We can install GSHP and other energy-efficient devices when building new homes or buildings
and receive tax credits. GSHP systems can be installed on lease for less cost. Carbon gases can
be reduced faster by replacing nonrenewable sources with renewable sources. (Iea, 2021). We
can support research to make renewable energy more affordable for everyone. It may not be
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possible to stop or collect all the pollutants causing climate change and the cost to do so is more
than installing GSHP that runs off the power, which can be sourced from renewable sources
(Erickson, 2021). Every renewable energy source that replaces a nonrenewable one gets us a
little closer to saving the planet.
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References
Bensel, T., & Carbone, I. (2020). Sustaining our planet. Retrieved from https://content.uagc.edu
Coskun, S. (2020). Performance Analysis of a Solar-Assisted Ground Source Heat Pump System
in Climatic Conditions of Turkey. Thermal Science, 24(2A), 977989.
https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI181019302C
Erickson, J. (2021 August 04). Home Heat Pumps Could Cut Pollution And Save Money.
Retrieved from https://www.futurity.org/home-heat-pumps-carbon-pollution-electricity-
homeowners-2607552/
Harjunowibowo, D., Omer, S. A., & Riffat, S. B. (2021). Experimental investigation of a
ground-source heat pump system for greenhouse heatingcooling. International Journal
of Low Carbon Technologies, 16(4), 15291541. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijlct/ctab052
Iea, (2021). Heat Pumps More efforts needed. Retrieved from https://www.iea.org/reports/heat-
pumps
Kose, A., & Petlenkov, E. (2016). Identification, implementation and simulation of Ground
Source Heat Pump with ground temperature modeling. 2016 15th Biennial Baltic
Electronics Conference (BEC), Electronics Conference (BEC), 2016 15th Biennial Baltic,
163166. https://doi.org/10.1109/BEC.2016.7743754
Widiatmojo, A., Uchida, Y., Fujii, H., Kosukegawa, H., Takashima, I., Shimada, Y.,
Chotpantarat, S., Charusiri, P., & Tran, T. T. (2021). Numerical simulations on potential
application of ground source heat pumps with vertical ground heat exchangers in
Bangkok and Hanoi. Energy Reports, 7, 69326944.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2021.10.069
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Wang, G., Li, J., Xia, T., Yang, C., Hou, L., & Zhang, Y. (2019). Generalized Inverse Optimal
Power Flow Calculation of Electrothermal Coupled Multi-energy Flow System
Contained Ground Source Heat Pump. 2019 IEEE 3rd Conference on Energy Internet
and Energy System Integration (EI2), Energy Internet and Energy System Integration
(EI2), 2019 IEEE 3rd Conference On, 207212.
https://doi.org/10.1109/EI247390.2019.9062271
Xuli WANG, Jing MA, Feng ZHAO, Liang TANG, & Lei WANG. (2020). The Modelling and
Energy Efficiency Analysis of Thermal Energy Management Operation of Ground
Source Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System. Thermal Science, 24(5B), 32293237.
https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI191123114W
Zhao, W., Zhang, Y., Chen, X., Su, W., Li, B., & Fu, Z. (2020). Experimental heating
performances of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) for heating road unit. Energy
Conversion and Management: X, 7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecmx.2020.100040
Zou, H., Pei, P., Wang, C., & Hao, D. (2021). A numerical study on heat transfer performances
of horizontal ground heat exchangers in ground-source heat pumps. PLoS ONE, 16(5), 1
19. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0250583

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Week 4 Assignment Ben Merritt Sustainable Living Guide Contributions, Part Four of Four: Sustaining our Atmosphere and Climate Your Term: [ground-source heat pump] When temperatures are freezing or extremely hot, it is essential to have a place with conditioned air where humans can be comfortable, safe, and healthy. With the increasing population, energy consumption has increased. Traditional heating and cooling methods require the use of fossil fuels and pollutants that damage the ecosystem. Ground-source heat pump systems (GSHP) is a renewable heat energy source in use by multiple business facilities and personal homes for heating and cooling exchange. The earth has a stable temperature over 6 ft underground that can be cooler or warmer than the temperature above ground level (Bensel & Carbone, 2020). The sun’s thermal energy is stored in the earth's soil layers. GSHP’s utilize this stored energy and temperature difference with unique underground multiple piping systems that can go horizontal and vertical. Water or an environmentally safe liquid with heat transfer properties is pushed through these pipes. The water takes heat in the pipes from the ground around the pipes, or the ground takes heat from the water in the pipes depending on the temperature inside the building. It is then transferred to the air inside the building to heat or cool (Xuli, Jing, Feng, Liang, & Lei, 2020). Some engineers have made units that integrate solar collection, power generation, water heating, and tubing designs into the GSHP, which has increased the system's efficiency and maintained energy costs (Coskun, 2020). GSHP units are even used for safe driving conditions to protect from icy conditions by heating highways during cold winter months (Zhao, Zhang, Chen, Su, Li, & Fu, 2020). Another significant usage of GSHP is in regulating temperatures in greenhouses used to grow food (Harjunowibowo, Omer, & Riffat, 2021). The best use of GSHP is keeping us safe from harmful climate temperature changes and not harming the environment around us. GSHP is an excellent solution to keep us warm or cool without contaminating the environment and affecting the ecosystem around us (Zou, Pei, Wang, & Hao, 2021). As society moves toward renewable energy, GSHP is being accepted as a source that can be used with other renewable sources to reduce the need for nonrenewable resources. The energy used is small compared to the massive amount of output. Although GSHP has not been researched to its full potential, it is part of our present and future (Wang, Li, Xia, Yang, Hou, & Zhang, 2019). The reduction of carbon and other harmful gases from the use of fossil fuels will allow cleaner air and slow global warming. The heat from the sun inside the earth will provide a safe environment for all while still giving us energy (Kose & Petlenkov, 2016). The economy is growing at a tremendous rate, and the need for power for everyone is high. The ground in some areas receives more solar energy, and therefore the temperature difference from the ground is closer to the air above. GSHP systems can be designed to work in areas where cooling is needed more than heating (Widiatmojo, et, al. 2021). GSHP is in its infancy, and more research is required to utilize its full potential. We can support renewable energy policies looking for zero-emission renewable energy sources like GSHP. Policies that reduce the cost for low income to install energy-saving systems. We can install GSHP and other energy-efficient devices when building new homes or buildings and receive tax credits. GSHP systems can be installed on lease for less cost. Carbon gases can be reduced faster by replacing nonrenewable sources with renewable sources. (Iea, 2021). We can support research to make renewable energy more affordable for everyone. It may not be possible to stop or collect all the pollutants causing climate change and the cost to do so is more than installing GSHP that runs off the power, which can be sourced from renewable sources (Erickson, 2021). Every renewable energy source that replaces a nonrenewable one gets us a little closer to saving the planet. References Bensel, T., & Carbone, I. (2020). Sustaining our planet. Retrieved from https://content.uagc.edu Coskun, S. (2020). Performance Analysis of a Solar-Assisted Ground Source Heat Pump System in Climatic Conditions of Turkey. Thermal Science, 24(2A), 977–989. https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI181019302C Erickson, J. (2021 August 04). Home Heat Pumps Could Cut Pollution And Save Money. Retrieved from https://www.futurity.org/home-heat-pumps-carbon-pollution-electricityhomeowners-2607552/ Harjunowibowo, D., Omer, S. A., & Riffat, S. B. (2021). Experimental investigation of a ground-source heat pump system for greenhouse heating–cooling. International Journal of Low Carbon Technologies, 16(4), 1529–1541. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijlct/ctab052 Iea, (2021). Heat Pumps More efforts needed. Retrieved from https://www.iea.org/reports/heatpumps Kose, A., & Petlenkov, E. (2016). Identification, implementation and simulation of Ground Source Heat Pump with ground temperature modeling. 2016 15th Biennial Baltic Electronics Conference (BEC), Electronics Conference (BEC), 2016 15th Biennial Baltic, 163–166. https://doi.org/10.1109/BEC.2016.7743754 Widiatmojo, A., Uchida, Y., Fujii, H., Kosukegawa, H., Takashima, I., Shimada, Y., Chotpantarat, S., Charusiri, P., & Tran, T. T. (2021). Numerical simulations on potential application of ground source heat pumps with vertical ground heat exchangers in Bangkok and Hanoi. Energy Reports, 7, 6932–6944. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2021.10.069 Wang, G., Li, J., Xia, T., Yang, C., Hou, L., & Zhang, Y. (2019). Generalized Inverse Optimal Power Flow Calculation of Electrothermal Coupled Multi-energy Flow System Contained Ground Source Heat Pump. 2019 IEEE 3rd Conference on Energy Internet and Energy System Integration (EI2), Energy Internet and Energy System Integration (EI2), 2019 IEEE 3rd Conference On, 207–212. https://doi.org/10.1109/EI247390.2019.9062271 Xuli WANG, Jing MA, Feng ZHAO, Liang TANG, & Lei WANG. (2020). The Modelling and Energy Efficiency Analysis of Thermal Energy Management Operation of Ground Source Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System. Thermal Science, 24(5B), 3229–3237. https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI191123114W Zhao, W., Zhang, Y., Chen, X., Su, W., Li, B., & Fu, Z. (2020). Experimental heating performances of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) for heating road unit. Energy Conversion and Management: X, 7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecmx.2020.100040 Zou, H., Pei, P., Wang, C., & Hao, D. (2021). A numerical study on heat transfer performances of horizontal ground heat exchangers in ground-source heat pumps. PLoS ONE, 16(5), 1– 19. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0250583 Name: Description: ...
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