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UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES CEBU
College of Social Sciences
Master of Education Program
_________________________________________________________________________
Reflection Paper
Anthro 289: Special Problems in the Anthropology of Education
Course Code/ Title
MAGNOLIA LAUS
Professor
APRIL LOVE L. SANTIAGO
MEd-ESL Student
SEPTEMBER 17, 2020
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1. Research on the internet on how the school functions as a socializing agent.
2. Access and read Saldana, J. (2013) and Tyler, K.M., et al. (2008). See the course guide for
links.
3. Write a short essay (500-1000 words reflecting the following points:
• Enumerate ways on how the school performs the function of socialization.
• What is the primary purpose of school as a social institution, as Saldana (2013) discussed?
• What is cultural discontinuity theory as defined by Tyler (2008)?
• Cite examples of cultural discontinuity?
• As a teacher, what is your role in transmitting culture to your learners?
Socialization is the process of creating a social self, learning one’s culture, and learning
the rules and expectations of the culture. Among the essential agencies of socialization is the
school. Aside from home, school is where socialization and cultural transmission occur. The
school is the primary agency of socialization and the first large-scale organization of which the
child becomes a member of society. Most of the child’s time is spent in school, and during this
time, the child acquires a lot of ideas and knowledge from the teachers and fellow students. With
this, the school becomes an important agent of socialization. The school combines the formal
approach (classroom teachings) and informal approach (peer group influences/pressure) in its
socializing purpose.
How does the school perform its function as a socializing agent? First, through the
curriculum, the school, in a formal way, provides the child with the knowledge of basic intellectual
skills such as reading, writing, verbal expression, quantitative, and other cognitive abilities. It
teaches the students languages and allows them to communicate with each other. Second, it will
enable the students to socialize and become members of society and play meaningful roles in the
complex network of independent positions. Third, it helps shape values and attitudes to the needs
of the contemporary community. Fourth, it widens the mental horizons of students and teaches
them new ways of looking at themselves and their community. Fifth, it offers young people
academic, emotional, and social growth opportunities. Thus, the school can promote new values
and stimulate adaptation to change conditions. Lastly, in an informal way, it supports the student
in discovering several other social roles and skills vital for their inclusive advancement as a
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member of society. For example, education teaches the community’s laws, traditions, norms,
rights that individuals will enjoy, and responsibilities. Education teaches how one behaves
towards their peers and adults. It teaches how to share things and ideas. It prepares how to
compete responsibly. It teaches how to cooperate, respect, obey rules and relate to others well.
It allows one to understand the cultures of one’s society. It also leads toward open-mindedness
and humanitarian attitudes towards ethnic and social groups.
According to Saldana (2013) in their paper entitled “Power and Conformity in Today’s
Schools,” the school is responsible for socializing groups of children and young people on specific
skills and values in a society. The School system has been charged with promoting conformity or
consistency. The purpose of the school is to give heterogeneous the community a commonness.
It is designed to be scientifically managed to ensure order and efficiency. Herewith, norms prompt
students to abandon some of their freedoms in exchange for the benefit of acquiring an education.
However, is it acceptable to relinquish or discontinue one’s culturally value-based school
behaviors to boost psychological well-being and overall schooling experiences? According to
Tyler (2008), cultural discontinuity is defined as a school-based behavioral process where the
cultural value-based learning preferences and practices of many ethnic minorities students- those
typically originating from home or parental socialization activities are discontinued at school. It is
conceptualized as the difference between ethnic minority students’ reports of their cultural value-
based behaviors exhibited at home and those shown at school. Cultural discontinuity begins when
those culturally-based behaviors typically exhibited at home are discontinued or revealed to a
much lesser degree at school. For example, a student seldom asks questions during an open
forum or lecture because they can likely learn better if they listen or observe. Still, teachers viewed
them as inattentive or not participative. Another example in the Filipino classroom setting is
praying before starting a class or ending a lesson. The Catholic religion is given more attention
than other religions like Islam. Some Muslim students are forced to adapt to how Catholic people
pray. In addition, there are also students at home who are very talkative and energetic because
that’s how their parents taught them to be active and friendly to others. Still, some teachers viewed
them as unlovable, problematic, and challenging to handle in school. They try to adapt the rules
set to them or expected from them. Moreover, students from far-away provinces also transfer
residency and enroll in cities. They are forced to adopt the culture of the students living in the
town inside the classroom. Some of them tend to follow how city students dress, speak, and react.
They try to change their identity and abandon their culture just to fit in. As a teacher, my role in
the transmission of culture to my learners is the following: (1) To build on the culture; my students
have to make their learning more accessible and better (2) To transform diverse racial, ethnic,
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and religious groups into the sharing of shared identity (3) To expose and introduce students to
other existing beliefs, norms and values (4) To represent the concept of freedom, dignity of the
individual rights and duties (5) To teach students the importance of cultural diversity and to display
respect to individual differences. (6) To promote the emergence and maintenance of democratic
culture. Lastly, (7) To act as a loving facilitator of learning by creating a homelike school
environment for all students with different cultures.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES CEBU College of Social Sciences Master of Education Program _________________________________________________________________________ Reflection Paper Anthro 289: Special Problems in the Anthropology of Education Course Code/ Title MAGNOLIA LAUS Professor APRIL LOVE L. SANTIAGO MEd-ESL Student SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 1. Research on the internet on how the school functions as a socializing agent. 2. Access and read Saldana, J. (2013) and Tyler, K.M., et al. (2008). See the course guide for links. 3. Write a short essay (500-1000 words reflecting the following points: • Enumerate ways on how the school performs the function of socialization. • What is the primary purpose of school as a social institution, as Saldana (2013) discussed? • What is cultural discontinuity theory as defined by Tyler (2008)? • Cite examples of cultural discontinuity? • As a teacher, what is your role in transmitting culture to your learners? Socialization is the process of creating a social self, learning one’s culture, and learning the rules and expectations of the culture. Among the essential agencies of socialization is the school. Aside from home, school is where socialization and cultural transmission occur. The school is the primary agency of socialization and the first large-scale organization of which the child becomes a member of society. Most of the child’s time is spent in school, and during this time, the child acquires a lot of ideas and knowledge from the teachers and fellow students. With this, the school becomes an important agent of socialization. The school combines the formal approach (classroom teachings) and informal approach (peer group influences/pressure) in its socializing purpose. How does the school perform its function as a socializing agent? First, through the curriculum, the school, in a formal way, provides the child with the knowledge of basic intellectual skills such as reading, writing, verbal expression, quantitative, and other cognitive abilities. It teaches the students languages and allows them to communicate with each other. Second, it will enable the students to socialize and become members of society and play meaningful roles in the complex network of independent positions. Third, it helps shape values and attitudes to the needs of the contemporary community. Fourth, it widens the mental horizons of students and teaches them new ways of looking at themselves and their community. Fifth, it offers young people academic, emotional, and social growth opportunities. Thus, the school can promote new values and stimulate adaptation to change conditions. Lastly, in an informal way, it supports the student in discovering several other social roles and skills vital for their inclusive advancement as a member of society. For example, education teaches the community’s laws, traditions, norms, rights that individuals will enjoy, and responsibilities. Education teaches how one behaves towards their peers and adults. It teaches how to share things and ideas. It prepares how to compete responsibly. It teaches how to cooperate, respect, obey rules and relate to others well. It allows one to understand the cultures of one’s society. It also leads toward open-mindedness and humanitarian attitudes towards ethnic and social groups. According to Saldana (2013) in their paper entitled “Power and Conformity in Today’s Schools,” the school is responsible for socializing groups of children and young people on specific skills and values in a society. The School system has been charged with promoting conformity or consistency. The purpose of the school is to give heterogeneous the community a commonness. It is designed to be scientifically managed to ensure order and efficiency. Herewith, norms prompt students to abandon some of their freedoms in exchange for the benefit of acquiring an education. However, is it acceptable to relinquish or discontinue one’s culturally value-based school behaviors to boost psychological well-being and overall schooling experiences? According to Tyler (2008), cultural discontinuity is defined as a school-based behavioral process where the cultural value-based learning preferences and practices of many ethnic minorities students- those typically originating from home or parental socialization activities are discontinued at school. It is conceptualized as the difference between ethnic minority students’ reports of their cultural valuebased behaviors exhibited at home and those shown at school. Cultural discontinuity begins when those culturally-based behaviors typically exhibited at home are discontinued or revealed to a much lesser degree at school. For example, a student seldom asks questions during an open forum or lecture because they can likely learn better if they listen or observe. Still, teachers viewed them as inattentive or not participative. Another example in the Filipino classroom setting is praying before starting a class or ending a lesson. The Catholic religion is given more attention than other religions like Islam. Some Muslim students are forced to adapt to how Catholic people pray. In addition, there are also students at home who are very talkative and energetic because that’s how their parents taught them to be active and friendly to others. Still, some teachers viewed them as unlovable, problematic, and challenging to handle in school. They try to adapt the rules set to them or expected from them. Moreover, students from far-away provinces also transfer residency and enroll in cities. They are forced to adopt the culture of the students living in the town inside the classroom. Some of them tend to follow how city students dress, speak, and react. They try to change their identity and abandon their culture just to fit in. As a teacher, my role in the transmission of culture to my learners is the following: (1) To build on the culture; my students have to make their learning more accessible and better (2) To transform diverse racial, ethnic, and religious groups into the sharing of shared identity (3) To expose and introduce students to other existing beliefs, norms and values (4) To represent the concept of freedom, dignity of the individual rights and duties (5) To teach students the importance of cultural diversity and to display respect to individual differences. (6) To promote the emergence and maintenance of democratic culture. Lastly, (7) To act as a loving facilitator of learning by creating a homelike school environment for all students with different cultures. Name: Description: ...
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