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Define perceptual selection and describe the types of filters that prevent clear perception and the
reception of marketing stimuli.
The concept of perception has been defined as an individual processing a stimulus through
selection, organization, and interpretation (Solomon, 2017). This concept can be applied to the idea of
perceptual selection as it is implemented in the field of marketing. In discussing the use of perceptual
selection, several types of filters exist within this type of selection. These filters can prevent both clear
perception and the reception of marketing stimuli. The following matters will be introduced to discuss
the definition of perceptual stimuli, identifying types of filters, and how the filters affect clear
perception and effective marketing stimuli.
To begin understanding perceptual selection, it is important to define the concept. The concept
of perceptual selection has been defined as the reaction an individual has to a certain portion of stimuli
instead of a whole stimulus to which they are exposed (Solomon, 2017). For example, an individual may
be presented with a painting of a bouquet of several types of flowers. However, when recalling the
flowers in the picture may only remember one of the types of flowers. This is indicative of how the
individual processed the painting, selected a piece of information from the painting, organized their
perception, and interpreted the subject matter of the painting.
After understanding the concept of perceptual selection, the types of filters that can prevent
clear perception should be considered. These filters are classified as perceptual. One of the perceptual
filters is perceptual vigilance, where the individual will be more aware of a certain stimulus based on
their current needs (Solomon, 2017). For example, if someone needs a new car, they may be more apt
to pay attention to a car commercial. The other perceptual filter is perceptual defense, where the
individual may not properly process the meaning of stimulus that they deem a threat (Solomon, 2017).
An example of this is if an individual does not like to hear swear words, and they chose to not respond to
a certain part of a stimulus due to it containing swear words.
The discussed filters can affect both clear perception and effective marketing stimuli as a result
of personal and stimulus selection factors. When considering these factors, personal factors related to
an individual’s historical stimulus context and stimulus factors relate to what an individual chooses to
perceive (Solomon, 2017). The personal factor can alter a clear perception of a marketing stimulus
through adaptation, or how many stimuli a consumer is willing to notice over time (Solomon, 2017). For
example, a consumer may begin to ignore a repeated advertisement because of overexposure. The
stimulus selection factor can alter a clear perception of a marketing stimulus as a result of the material
being too one-note or lacking in contrast to another stimulus around the consumer (Solomon, 2017). For
example, a consumer would be less apt to watch a commercial with the same message as another
commercial unless the two advertisements were contrasted, such as using different imagery.
When considering the concept of perceptual selection, it is important to consider its definition
as it being the reaction an individual has to a small part of stimuli instead of a whole stimulus. This
information can be used to understand how filters can alter the clear perception and effective
application of marketing stimulus. These filters include perceptual vigilance and defense. The filters
relate to how an individual’s awareness of a stimulus and not processing a stimulus because it is
perceived as a threat. In applying these filters to how clear perception and marketing stimulus is
prevented; two instances were discussed. One is that a consumer may not view an advertisement if it is
consistently repeated, resulting in overexposure. Another instance is that a consumer may be less apt to
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watch a commercial if it does not contrast greatly enough from another commercial with similar
content. In understanding this information, a basis is formed in the concept of perceptual selection and
how it affects clear perception and the reception of marketing stimuli.
Reference
Solomon, M. (2017). Consumer behavior: Buying, having, and being. London, England: Pearson.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Define perceptual selection and describe the types of filters that prevent clear perception and the reception of marketing stimuli. The concept of perception has been defined as an individual processing a stimulus through selection, organization, and interpretation (Solomon, 2017). This concept can be applied to the idea of perceptual selection as it is implemented in the field of marketing. In discussing the use of perceptual selection, several types of filters exist within this type of selection. These filters can prevent both clear perception and the reception of marketing stimuli. The following matters will be introduced to discuss the definition of perceptual stimuli, identifying types of filters, and how the filters affect clear perception and effective marketing stimuli. To begin understanding perceptual selection, it is important to define the concept. The concept of perceptual selection has been defined as the reaction an individual has to a certain portion of stimuli instead of a whole stimulus to which they are exposed (Solomon, 2017). For example, an individual may be presented with a painting of a bouquet of several types of flowers. However, when recalling the flowers in the picture may only remember one of the types of flowers. This is indicative of how the individual processed the painting, selected a piece of information from the painting, organized their perception, and interpreted the subject matter of the painting. After understanding the concept of perceptual selection, the types of filters that can prevent clear perception should be considered. These filters are classified as perceptual. One of the perceptual filters is perceptual vigilance, where the individual will be more aware of a certain stimulus based on their current needs (Solomon, 2017). For example, if someone needs a new car, they may be more apt to pay attention to a car commercial. The other perceptual filter is perceptual defense, where the individual may not properly process the meaning of stimulus that they deem a threat (Solomon, 2017). An example of this is if an individual does not like to hear swear words, and they chose to not respond to a certain part of a stimulus due to it containing swear words. The discussed filters can affect both clear perception and effective marketing stimuli as a result of personal and stimulus selection factors. When considering these factors, personal factors related to an individual’s historical stimulus context and stimulus factors relate to what an individual chooses to perceive (Solomon, 2017). The personal factor can alter a clear perception of a marketing stimulus through adaptation, or how many stimuli a consumer is willing to notice over time (Solomon, 2017). For example, a consumer may begin to ignore a repeated advertisement because of overexposure. The stimulus selection factor can alter a clear perception of a marketing stimulus as a result of the material being too one-note or lacking in contrast to another stimulus around the consumer (Solomon, 2017). For example, a consumer would be less apt to watch a commercial with the same message as another commercial unless the two advertisements were contrasted, such as using different imagery. When considering the concept of perceptual selection, it is important to consider its definition as it being the reaction an individual has to a small part of stimuli instead of a whole stimulus. This information can be used to understand how filters can alter the clear perception and effective application of marketing stimulus. These filters include perceptual vigilance and defense. The filters relate to how an individual’s awareness of a stimulus and not processing a stimulus because it is perceived as a threat. In applying these filters to how clear perception and marketing stimulus is prevented; two instances were discussed. One is that a consumer may not view an advertisement if it is consistently repeated, resulting in overexposure. Another instance is that a consumer may be less apt to watch a commercial if it does not contrast greatly enough from another commercial with similar content. In understanding this information, a basis is formed in the concept of perceptual selection and how it affects clear perception and the reception of marketing stimuli. Reference Solomon, M. (2017). Consumer behavior: Buying, having, and being. London, England: Pearson. Name: Description: ...
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